Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > Medieval and Byzantine History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 12th, 2013, 05:35 AM   #11
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Jun 2013
From: South Korea (A Marxist-Leninist country based in Seoul) / originally from Toronto
Posts: 1,973
Blog Entries: 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by pugsville View Post
Common Law?
Trail by Juries?
Trial by juries has always been a main feature in Celtic, Germanic, and the Maliki school of Islamic laws. I'm afraid the British common law is Islamic by origin as I believe that laws of very different cultural origin have always been more influential in any parts of the world.
needstablity is offline  
Remove Ads
Old June 12th, 2013, 05:50 AM   #12
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Jun 2013
From: South Korea (A Marxist-Leninist country based in Seoul) / originally from Toronto
Posts: 1,973
Blog Entries: 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by caldrail View Post
Further, by the time of 1066, we see a clear national identity among saxons inhabitants, coloured by the normal feudalism of past ages.
I personally try not to think with an ethnic point of view because of my parents' background. I believe the Norman nobles spoke a different language from the rest of the population for 2-3 centuries. And the use of languages do separate people at some points of English history.

Last edited by needstablity; June 12th, 2013 at 06:43 AM.
needstablity is offline  
Old June 12th, 2013, 06:14 AM   #13

Ulster Patriot's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Jan 2013
Posts: 335

It was the Bede who coined the name English and it was Alfred who later promoted it.
Ulster Patriot is offline  
Old June 12th, 2013, 06:40 AM   #14

caldrail's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Feb 2012
Posts: 4,892
Blog Entries: 15

I doubt that. England after all means 'Land of the Angles', which predates Bede. You can argue about the origin of national identity but not about the generic label that went with inhabitants of Angle-land.
caldrail is offline  
Old June 12th, 2013, 07:55 AM   #15

Haesten's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 2,486

Quote:
Originally Posted by needstablity View Post
Trial by juries has always been a main feature in Celtic, Germanic, and the Maliki school of Islamic laws. I'm afraid the British common law is Islamic by origin as I believe that laws of very different cultural origin have always been more influential in any parts of the world.
Scotland does not use common law and Ireland only partly.

"In the late 800s, Alfred the Great assembled the Doom book (not to be confused with the more-famous Domesday Book from 200 years later), which collected the existing laws of Kent, Wessex, and Mercia, and attempted to blend in the Mosaic code, Christian principles, and Germanic customs dating as far as the fifth century.

Before the Norman conquest in 1066, justice was administered primarily by what is today known as the county courts (the modern "counties" were referred to as "Shires" in pre-Norman times), presided by the diocesan bishop and the sheriff, exercising both ecclesiastical and civil jurisdiction. Trial by jury began in these courts."

So the principal of common law can be traced to Alfred, the Muslims had only just arrived in Sicily (827)
By the time the Normans arrived in Sicily an Arab-Byzantine culture had developed.
Haesten is online now  
Old June 12th, 2013, 03:57 PM   #16
Citizen
 
Joined: Jun 2013
From: Ireland
Posts: 15

English Language is number 1 but the Anglo-Saxons also kept out the Danish Vikings from later trying to conquer Britain. The UK and Ireland would be All Danish today possibly if not for the Anglo-Saxons.
Tom464 is offline  
Old June 12th, 2013, 04:47 PM   #17
Scholar
 
Joined: Aug 2012
Posts: 669

Quote:
Originally Posted by needstablity View Post
Trial by juries has always been a main feature in Celtic, Germanic, and the Maliki school of Islamic laws. I'm afraid the British common law is Islamic by origin as I believe that laws of very different cultural origin have always been more influential in any parts of the world.
There was a whole big topic about this.

Suffice to say, it's not a very strongly established hypothesis. Cannot be dismissed out of hand, but not really based on much evidence.
MAlexMatt is offline  
Old June 18th, 2013, 02:58 AM   #18

St Oswald's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Northumbria
Posts: 447

Quote:
Originally Posted by caldrail View Post
That depends. Regional identity is a very strong characteristic of any people and the Britons were no exception (we still make jokes about regional characters today based on stereotypes). However, the advent of english/danish struggles must have cemented the wessex-dominated national identity, and Alfred isn't called 'the Great' for nothing. Further, by the time of 1066, we see a clear national identity among saxons inhabitants, coloured by the normal feudalism of past ages.
Alfred was King of Wessex only as the History of England and in fact Great Britain is totally Southern bias , most of the stories emanated from the South , Angle legacy can be seen , but seldom is it written or debated all the way up to the Firth of Forth in todays Scotland . Here things were very different .
St Oswald is offline  
Old June 18th, 2013, 03:18 AM   #19

Haesten's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 2,486

Quote:
Originally Posted by St Oswald View Post
Alfred was King of Wessex only as the History of England and in fact Great Britain is totally Southern bias , most of the stories emanated from the South , Angle legacy can be seen , but seldom is it written or debated all the way up to the Firth of Forth in todays Scotland . Here things were very different .
Bǣda was a northerner, he wrote his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum at Monkwearmouth in Sunderland.
The work was dedicated to (Saint) Ceolwulf, King of Northumbria.

Bede's knowledge of southern history came from Albinus (died 732) abbot of St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury, who assisted with the work.
Haesten is online now  
Old June 18th, 2013, 03:57 AM   #20

St Oswald's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Apr 2013
From: Northumbria
Posts: 447

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haesten View Post
Bǣda was a northerner, he wrote his Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum at Monkwearmouth in Sunderland.
The work was dedicated to (Saint) Ceolwulf, King of Northumbria.

Bede's knowledge of southern history came from Albinus (died 732) abbot of St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury, who assisted with the work.
It was at St Peter/St Pauls in Jarrow Northumbria where he wrote his books , the place in Sunderland was an offshoot to the main monastery in Jarrow. Destroyed like many things Northumbrian by the Tudor ''Taliban''
St Oswald is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > Medieval and Byzantine History

Tags
anglosaxon, legacy



Search tags for this page
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why was the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle discontinued? Earl Byrhtnoth Medieval and Byzantine History 11 September 28th, 2016 01:55 AM
What do we know about Anglo-Saxon warfare? Salah War and Military History 7 September 15th, 2016 08:11 AM
Anglo-Saxon invasion Chookie Ancient History 120 April 9th, 2014 06:30 AM
Anglo-Saxon Migrations Caracalla European History 83 September 8th, 2013 01:59 PM
Anglo-Saxon Riddles Richard Stanbery Ancient History 27 December 28th, 2011 12:29 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.