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Old June 18th, 2013, 07:03 AM   #21

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Originally Posted by St Oswald View Post
Alfred was King of Wessex only as the History of England and in fact Great Britain is totally Southern bias , most of the stories emanated from the South , Angle legacy can be seen , but seldom is it written or debated all the way up to the Firth of Forth in todays Scotland . Here things were very different .
Yes, bu tthe line of kings from Wessex would go on to rule england in its entirety (they had already dominated England prior to the Danelaw). Scotland is another matter, and interestingly, would later rule England, and later still, seek independence from the very united kingdom it founded. Go figure...
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Old June 18th, 2013, 07:24 PM   #22
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When I read something about the English history, I always thought about this.

What is the legacy of the Anglo-Saxons (that we can encounter today)?

There are probably less than I can think of. William the Conqueror practically eroded almost everything about the previous Anglo-Saxons in England. There are a handful of Anglo-Saxon era churches today. This is all I can think of.
Considering that the name of the country is "England" and the language "English" this seems like kind of a silly question.
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Old June 19th, 2013, 02:29 PM   #23

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It was at St Peter/St Pauls in Jarrow Northumbria where he wrote his books , the place in Sunderland was an offshoot to the main monastery in Jarrow. Destroyed like many things Northumbrian by the Tudor ''Taliban''
St Peter at Monkwearmouth was founded in 674 by Benedict Biscop, in 682 King Egfrid of Northumbria gave Benedict more land for the sister monastery of St Paul at Jarrow.
Benedict appointed Ceolfrith (Bede's tutor) as superior of St Paul at Jarrow, Bede probably transferred to Jarrow with Ceolfrith as you say.
Both monasteries had good libraries for Bede's HE and are only a few miles apart.
Benedict stipulated that the two sites should function as 'one monastery in two places'.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 08:10 AM   #24

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lol Needstability can be dismissed out of hand.

Circa 599 to 616; The Laws of Aethelberht, first extant recorded laws written in English.

These are the laws that set in motion English Law, the ones still extant are copies, however we know they were written in English, because Bede tells us so.

Mohammed wasn't even born.

Also from the 10th Century onwards the Church (that is nothing to do with Islam) was promoting the abolotion of Slavery, Islam was busy promoting it and has never stopped.

There is no reliable evidence (and a lot of cicrcumstantial evidence to the opposite) that Trial by jury was practiced pre Conquest, it was the King's job to administer Justice, and he employed reeves to ensure this was adhered to.

Magna Charta from where the priniciples (if not the actual acts) of much English law were certainly not Islamic, they harked back to Saxon law and hence to Aethelberht.

Islam is no where, the only touch it ever had was in the form of Offa, stamping some money with fake (they are unintelligible to Arabs) arab lettering so that his Gold coins might be tradeable in the Levant.

Last edited by JohnAshtone; June 20th, 2013 at 08:14 AM.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 09:47 AM   #25
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lol Needstability can be dismissed out of hand.
Eh, is it necessary? I love British history anyways.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 12:18 PM   #26

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Originally Posted by JohnAshtone View Post
lol Needstability can be dismissed out of hand.

Circa 599 to 616; The Laws of Aethelberht, first extant recorded laws written in English.

These are the laws that set in motion English Law, the ones still extant are copies, however we know they were written in English, because Bede tells us so.

Mohammed wasn't even born.

Also from the 10th Century onwards the Church (that is nothing to do with Islam) was promoting the abolotion of Slavery, Islam was busy promoting it and has never stopped.

There is no reliable evidence (and a lot of cicrcumstantial evidence to the opposite) that Trial by jury was practiced pre Conquest, it was the King's job to administer Justice, and he employed reeves to ensure this was adhered to.

Magna Charta from where the priniciples (if not the actual acts) of much English law were certainly not Islamic, they harked back to Saxon law and hence to Aethelberht.

Islam is no where, the only touch it ever had was in the form of Offa, stamping some money with fake (they are unintelligible to Arabs) arab lettering so that his Gold coins might be tradeable in the Levant.
Textus Roffensis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textus_Roffensis

The Law of Æthelberht is in archaic Old English not found in Alfred's Old English era, where he says they were consulted for his laws, so probably a genuine copy.
As you say, Bede says the Law of Æthelberh was written in English speech.

Offa's coin was possibly a payment to the Pope and a copy of a coin the Pope's legates had shown him, part of the annual payment of 365 mancuses that Offa promised to Rome.
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Old June 20th, 2013, 04:47 PM   #27
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Part of the Saxon legacy is the English language (parts of it), plus the geography of England - the shire names and divisions. The Saxons turned England into a Catholic nation, they were the catalyst for creating the King Arthur myth, and they established the use of the word 'Easter' for that religious celebration.
The Anglo-Saxons turned Catholic Britain into a pagan nation and then back to a Catholic nation. The King Arthur myth was about a Celtic British king fighting the Anglo-Saxon invader.

Also, England at the time of the Norman Conquest had Danish, Celtic, and other racial and cultural influences.

The Normans did speak French for centuries after the conquest. The structure and basic words on English are Germanic, but legal, military, and more sophisticated terms tend to be French.

Last edited by betgo; June 20th, 2013 at 04:50 PM.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 11:52 AM   #28

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Originally Posted by St Oswald View Post
Alfred was King of Wessex only as the History of England and in fact Great Britain is totally Southern bias , most of the stories emanated from the South , Angle legacy can be seen , but seldom is it written or debated all the way up to the Firth of Forth in todays Scotland . Here things were very different .
Not strictly true, St Oswald. After 885AD, Alfred in royal charters began to style himself Anglorum Saxonum Rex, king of the Anglo-Saxons. Before that date he styled himself Saxonum Rex or Westseaxena cinge, king of the West Saxons.
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Old June 21st, 2013, 01:08 PM   #29

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Not strictly true, St Oswald. After 885AD, Alfred in royal charters began to style himself Anglorum Saxonum Rex, king of the Anglo-Saxons. Before that date he styled himself Saxonum Rex or Westseaxena cinge, king of the West Saxons.
At that time Guthrid Rex was King of NorÞanhymbra with no fealty to Alfred , he may have claimed it but never was it . Wessex Kings did eventually unify England . It is debatable to what degree maybe more as Bretwalda.

My point entirely the history is written by the successful dynasty , its their legacy that is in the books still the same today
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Old June 21st, 2013, 01:13 PM   #30

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Originally Posted by caldrail View Post
Yes, bu tthe line of kings from Wessex would go on to rule england in its entirety (they had already dominated England prior to the Danelaw). Scotland is another matter, and interestingly, would later rule England, and later still, seek independence from the very united kingdom it founded. Go figure...

This is of course true , but debatable which one was actually the ruler of a unified state . The shire structures were never evident in Northumbria and of course the later doomsday written by the Saxons on behalf of their new masters never included Northumbria .

If you mean James V1(a bit of subject) yes true , but again he remained in the south , never went back North (maybe once) and became like his predecessors .
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