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Old March 22nd, 2014, 10:19 AM   #21
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Good topic.

I didn't know this
From wiki
"..The name was still used to describe sedition and treachery in 1605, when Guy Fawkes and his associates were branded "Robin Hoods" by Robert Cecil..."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood
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Old March 23rd, 2014, 12:17 PM   #22

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Originally Posted by Sindane View Post
Good topic.

I didn't know this
From wiki
"..The name was still used to describe sedition and treachery in 1605, when Guy Fawkes and his associates were branded "Robin Hoods" by Robert Cecil..."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood
Didn't know that either, so ta for putting it on
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Old January 6th, 2017, 08:16 AM   #23
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Two guys found a pardon for Robin Hood, apparently he was a real person.

Robin Hood Loxley - Robin Hood Loxley
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Old January 6th, 2017, 08:41 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Sindane View Post
Good topic.

I didn't know this
From wiki
"..The name was still used to describe sedition and treachery in 1605, when Guy Fawkes and his associates were branded "Robin Hoods" by Robert Cecil..."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood
And that practice started at least as early as the 1200s, so we know that there were 'Robin Hoods' during the time of the earliest ballads - that is, the early 1300s. We also know that they are set in a historical context, as the king (named Edward) is described as staying in Nottingham for two weeks, which Edward II really did do in 1323. So I don't see any issue at all with the notion that someone wrote some ballads about a particular outlaw during this time.

Last edited by Calebxy; January 6th, 2017 at 09:47 AM.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 10:40 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Calebxy View Post
And that practice started at least as early as the 1200s, so we know that there were 'Robin Hoods' during the time of the earliest ballads - that is, the early 1300s. We also know that they are set in a historical context, as the king (named Edward) is described as staying in Nottingham for two weeks, which Edward II really did do in 1323. So I don't see any issue at all with the notion that someone wrote some ballads about a particular outlaw during this time.
Hooded Robbers were common, but Robert Hode was his real name, not a nickname and Robin Hood is known for wearing Lincoln Green not a hood. Lincoln Green was the colour of the king's archers and as you know Robin is renown for his prowess as an archer.

Last edited by 1an; January 6th, 2017 at 10:42 AM.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 11:23 AM   #26

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Lincoln Green was the colour of the king's archers and as you know Robin is renown for his prowess as an archer.
Actually green and white particoloured coats and hats were the standard attire of royal archers during the Hundred Years War, particularly the famous Cheshire archers. Some Welsh archer companies were dressed in red and white particoloured garments.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 12:27 PM   #27
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Actually green and white particoloured coats and hats were the standard attire of royal archers during the Hundred Years War, particularly the famous Cheshire archers. Some Welsh archer companies were dressed in red and white particoloured garments.
Green and white was the livery of the Cheshire archers and they were active in the hundred year war as you say, see below. The royal connection is with John O' Gaunt the king's eldest son.

"The Cheshire archers were paid more than bowmen from elsewhere and had been recruited as the royal bodyguard by 1334. They could be recognised by their green and white livery which was issued to them by the chamberlain of Chester castle. They were taken into France by Edward III, and later the Black Prince, and played important roles in the English victories at the battles of Crecy in 1346 and Poitiers in 1356."
Pilgrims and Posies: Bowmen of Cheshire

See here for Lincoln Green:

"The livery of archers associated with the king is Lincoln Green. King Edward II had his men all clothed in green and after his death Roger Mortimer who ruled England for nearly four years as regent alongside Queen Isabella the wife of Edward II did the same. Queen Catherine the wife of King Henry VIII had her yeomen guard wear Lincoln Green and for travelling they wore grey as described in the Gest of Robin Hood. When Queen Elizabeth II is in Scotland her personal bodyguard is the “very antique Royal Company of Archers. Green-liveried and armed with longbows. Robin Hood and his men are said to have worn Lincoln Green and the Gest tells us Robin was in the service of the king."
Yeoman Archer - Robin Hood

Last edited by 1an; January 6th, 2017 at 12:31 PM.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 12:31 PM   #28
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Robert Hode was his real name,
I think it's highly implausible that the Robert Hode of that particular record was the Robin Hood of the ballads, given that, as explained in my previous message, the events in the Geste (and therefore Robin's pardon) took place in the 1320s, not the 1380s.

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Lincoln Green was the colour of the king's archers and as you know Robin is renown for his prowess as an archer.
I read that Lincoln green was the colour worn by the Early of Lincoln's (that is, Thomas of Lancaster's) private army. The king killed the Earl in 1322 and subsequently fought against his supporters (which may well have included a certain Robert Hood of Wakefield, though I do not believe he is the same one as the Robert in the article which you linked to earlier). However, the records of Edward's stay in Nottingham in 1323 show that he pardoned a number of supporters of Thomas of Lancaster on this occasion. Therefore, it's quite reasonable to suppose that Robin Hood and his merry men, dressed in Lincoln green, were supports of Thomas of Lancaster who then really were pardoned by the king in 1323.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 12:36 PM   #29
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I think it's highly implausible that the Robert Hode of that particular record was the Robin Hood of the ballads, given that, as explained in my previous message, the events in the Geste (and therefore Robin's pardon) took place in the 1320s, not the 1380s.

I read that Lincoln green was the colour worn by the Early of Lincoln's (that is, Thomas of Lancaster's) private army. The king killed the Earl in 1322 and subsequently fought against his supporters (which may well have included a certain Robert Hood of Wakefield, though I do not believe he is the same one as the Robert in the article which you linked to earlier). However, the records of Edward's stay in Nottingham in 1323 show that he pardoned a number of supporters of Thomas of Lancaster on this occasion. Therefore, it's quite reasonable to suppose that Robin Hood and his merry men, dressed in Lincoln green, were supports of Thomas of Lancaster who then really were pardoned by the king in 1323.
It's no good 'thinking' if you are going to make a statement of fact you need to provide evidence.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 11:51 PM   #30
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It's no good 'thinking' if you are going to make a statement of fact you need to provide evidence.
Well I just mean he probably would have been a bit too old if he was active in the 1320s. Especially since he was supposed to have died a little over 23 years after the king's visit (in 1323), meaning the Robin Hood of the Geste should have died in 1347.

Plus, in any case, the pardoning of Robert Hood in the 1380s is definitely not the pardoning of Robin Hood in the ballads, even if they were the same person, because that took place during King Edward's two-week stay in Nottingham, before he then went on to Lancaster. Edward II's 1323 visit to Nottingham is the only event which matches this, and it also makes sense considering the records show that he did pardon a number of rebels and supporters of Thomas of Lancaster (whose men wore Lincoln green) at this time.
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