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Old November 28th, 2017, 12:37 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by stevapalooza View Post
Well if we're talking about native African medicine we're mostly talking about shamanism in those days. In east Africa there were shamans/healers called mganga. They used various herbs, potions, and healing techniques like bloodletting and applying hot or cold irons. Since many illness were associated with evil spirits they were also exorcists and diviners. In areas where there was contact with Muslims some Islamic ideas tended to creep into the native religion, like belief in jinns.
Well I've read that the people of Kush used Tetracycline. In medieval Mali, as in most other parts of Africa at the time, painkillers and antiseptics were in use. Also in Mali, cataract removal was performed. In the area of present day Uganda, Caesarean sections were performed with a very high level of success. And I think I remember reading somewhere that in the 18th C a slave named Onesimus introduced a small pox inoculation technique to Boston. I'm asking for a comparison because I know that king Henry VIII died of an infected wound in 1547. So I don't think proper disinfectants were in use in England at the time.
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Old December 23rd, 2017, 11:54 AM   #12

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Well I've read that the people of Kush used Tetracycline. In medieval Mali, as in most other parts of Africa at the time, painkillers and antiseptics were in use. Also in Mali, cataract removal was performed. In the area of present day Uganda, Caesarean sections were performed with a very high level of success. And I think I remember reading somewhere that in the 18th C a slave named Onesimus introduced a small pox inoculation technique to Boston. I'm asking for a comparison because I know that king Henry VIII died of an infected wound in 1547. So I don't think proper disinfectants were in use in England at the time.
where did you find this marvelous information? where can i read about it? is it online or did you find it in a book? etc.
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Old December 23rd, 2017, 05:30 PM   #13

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Caesarean section in Africa, Uganda as observed by R.W Felkin in 1879.

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Old December 25th, 2017, 02:20 AM   #14

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where did you find this marvelous information? where can i read about it? is it online or did you find it in a book? etc.
Robin Walker has written three books on the subject. The series is titled Blacks and Science. The Journal of African Civilizations also has a publication with the same title.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 12:16 AM   #15
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where did you find this marvelous information? where can i read about it? is it online or did you find it in a book? etc.
Onesimus (fl. 1706 - 1717), slave and medical pioneer, was born in the... | Hutchins Center
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Old January 12th, 2018, 02:32 PM   #16

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Around 1 ACE, Alexandria was at the top of the world in medical science. Greeks & Romans trained in kind of a "philosophical" medicine (the "four humours") but came to Alexandria to be trained in "practical" medicine with 1000's of years of experience behind it. This was due in large part to Egypt being the only place in the world that did not have taboos against autopsies. Egyptians discovered the nervous system, as well as the function of many organs ... and actually discovered some cause & effect cures (like antimony to kill the bilharzia microscopic parasite <some difference of opinion over this>).

Galen was trained in Alexandria around 150 ACE, and he talks about exactly this topic. That's where all his drawings come from. I don't remember when it happened, but only a couple of 100 years after that "something" happened and this whole system shutdown. No more autopsies. Galen's drawings became like gold. Consider the problems Da Vinci and Michelangelo had studying anatomy. You can *STILL* buy copies of Galen from Amazon.

Galen is a good example. He trained as a "medical student" in Alexandria, but also studied as many medical textbooks he could find at the time. Many historians created histories by combining nameless old sources. Galen does a fair job of telling you where he got the various cures and treatments he listed: Cleopatra the Queen (yes, THAT Cleopatra ... she wrote two medical books), Cleopatra the physician (1st century ACE), Cleopatra the Philosopher (1st century ACE), Maria (both of them), Dioscorides (both of them), etc.

So, near the end of the Roman period, there were available medical textbooks, some with 1000's of years of provenance. Then the Dark Ages happened. I believe the re-birth of medicine came with the height of the Islamic Empire. They certainly didn't do autopsies, but THEY took over the reputation as the world's top physicians. I don't think they started from scratch. I think they referenced the old Greek & Roman texts.

How do we know? Only by the medical books that survive. Everything else is heresay: "he was a really good doctor."

Up until Galen, medical texts were written in Greek ... some translated to Latin (like Galen's works).

With the rebirth of medicine in Islam, most of the early Medieval texts were written in Arabic.

My knowledge kind of peters out here. I believe there was a bias against Arabic works and they were ignored during the Renaissance, so medicine started stumbling all over again. Arabic works started getting translated to French (mainly) and German starting around the 1800's.

I've just started reading some translations of Arabic ... that's translations of Egyptian history in coptic & demotic. Why? Different perspective. Roman's demonized Cleopatra for political purposes (don't get me started). Greeks saw her as a charming, able administrator: that's it, no serious national influence. Egyptians saw her as something like Elon Musk.

Last edited by Dios; January 12th, 2018 at 02:41 PM.
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Old January 12th, 2018, 02:38 PM   #17

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Well I've read that the people of Kush used Tetracycline. In medieval Mali, as in most other parts of Africa at the time, painkillers and antiseptics were in use. Also in Mali, cataract removal was performed. In the area of present day Uganda, Caesarean sections were performed with a very high level of success. And I think I remember reading somewhere that in the 18th C a slave named Onesimus introduced a small pox inoculation technique to Boston. I'm asking for a comparison because I know that king Henry VIII died of an infected wound in 1547. So I don't think proper disinfectants were in use in England at the time.
There are tribes in Africa today whose teeth show the telltale striations of long doses of tetracycline. Researchers were quite puzzled by this until they found a root where it occurred naturally.

I don't say this to reduce the innovation of Kush. I say this as reinforcement. There's no question the stuff was THERE.

Now, try explaining cocaine in mummies 4,000 years old. Coca has only EVER grown in South America. An interesting topic to Google, if you've got some time.
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Old January 14th, 2018, 02:18 AM   #18
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There are tribes in Africa today whose teeth show the telltale striations of long doses of tetracycline. Researchers were quite puzzled by this until they found a root where it occurred naturally.

I don't say this to reduce the innovation of Kush. I say this as reinforcement. There's no question the stuff was THERE.

Now, try explaining cocaine in mummies 4,000 years old. Coca has only EVER grown in South America. An interesting topic to Google, if you've got some time.
Yeah, I've read about those finds but apparently most experts agree that the coca found in the mummies was as a result of contamination during the autopsies as opposed to contact between ancient Egypt and a new world civilisation.
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Old January 14th, 2018, 03:47 AM   #19

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Fact and farce!
Mummies of tobacco, marijuana and cocaine: a curiosity to rewrite history ?! Fact or farce ?!
The subject is quite controversial and may lead historians, archaeologists, anthropologists and paleontologists to rewrite the history of mankind since its inception, with the early hominids of Africa. This is the subject called: the mummies of tobacco, marijuana and cocaine from Egypt. And now you will understand why this issue is extremely complex and controversial..[/QUOTE]


___________
I agree with the friend,this world has a lot of history that is badly told, Is cocaine one of the examples?

Fact and farce!
Mummies of tobacco, marijuana and cocaine: a curiosity to rewrite history ?! Fact or farce ?!
The subject is quite controversial and may lead historians, archaeologists, anthropologists and paleontologists to rewrite the history of mankind since its inception, with the early hominids of Africa. This is the subject called: the mummies of tobacco, marijuana and cocaine from Egypt. And now you will understand why this issue is extremely complex and controversial.
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Old January 14th, 2018, 04:56 AM   #20
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I'm asking for a comparison because I know that king Henry VIII died of an infected wound in 1547. So I don't think proper disinfectants were in use in England at the time.
Not existing and not being administered or properly administered (or not being enough due to other complications) are two different scenarios. About Henry VIII condition:

Quote:
Physical decline and death


Henry in 1542


Late in life, Henry became obese, with a waist measurement of 54 inches (140 cm), and had to be moved about with the help of mechanical inventions. He was covered with painful, pus-filled boils and possibly suffered from gout. His obesity and other medical problems can be traced from the jousting accident in 1536, in which he suffered a leg wound. The accident re-opened and aggravated a previous injury he had sustained years earlier, to the extent that his doctors found it difficult to treat. The wound festered for the remainder of his life and became ulcerated, thus preventing him from maintaining the level of physical activity he had previously enjoyed. The jousting accident is also believed to have caused Henry's mood swings, which may have had a dramatic effect on his personality and temperament.[137][138]
The theory that Henry suffered from syphilis has been dismissed by most historians.[139][140] Historian Susan Maclean Kybett ascribes his demise to scurvy, which is caused by a lack of fresh fruits and vegetables.[141] Alternatively, his wives' pattern of pregnancies and his mental deterioration have led some to suggest that the king may have been Kell positive and suffered from McLeod syndrome.[138][142] According to another study, Henry VIII's history and body morphology may have been the result of traumatic brain injury after his 1536 jousting accident, which in turn led to a neuroendocrine cause of his obesity. This analysis identifies growth hormone deficiency (GHD) as the source for his increased adiposity but also significant behavioural changes noted in his later years, including his multiple marriages.[143]


Coffins of King Henry VIII (centre, damaged), Queen Jane (right), King Charles I with a child of Queen Anne (left), vault under the choir, St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, marked by a stone slab in the floor. 1888 sketch by Alfred Young Nutt, Surveyor to the Dean and Canons


Henry's obesity hastened his death at the age of 55, which occurred on 28 January 1547 in the Palace of Whitehall, on what would have been his father's 90th birthday. He allegedly uttered his last words: "Monks! Monks! Monks!" perhaps in reference to the monks he caused to be evicted during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.[144] Henry VIII was interred in St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle, next to Jane Seymour.[145] Over a hundred years later, King Charles I (1625–1649) was buried in the same vault.[146]

Last edited by Yōḥānān; January 14th, 2018 at 05:00 AM.
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