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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:02 AM   #331
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But its also not a good way of determining anything as all of such stuff tells something different, nothing fits one another. The article itself just smells of propaganda made in Iran. But tell me this, are you suggesting that Azeri Turks of Caucasus and Iran are two different populations? That is so according to the same stuff that have been posted on internet, can you tell me how is this even possible when we have been separated for only 2 centuries and many have families on either side of Araz? You cannot show me anything logical behind this.

Where have I ever said such things you talk of, its just you that are so sensitive for your Kurdish brothers, and you always bring up some anti-Turk point in your discussions.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:09 AM   #332

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I just checked out the journal's website, it's a medical journal, not historical. I don't think they have a propagandistic (is that a word?) bias.

Could you point out where I have ever said anything anti-Turkish? If you think I'm anti-Turkish then you're a hell of a lot more sensitive than I am for my "Kurdish brothers"

Last edited by antocya; November 15th, 2012 at 06:16 AM.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:19 AM   #333
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Now I really do not know anything about this stuff, but doing some research, for instance this is supposedly showing Azeri Turks from Iran:

Q (9.09%)
N (6.06%)
O (3.03%)
C3 (3.03%)
R1a1 (3.03%)
R1a (3.03%)
R1*(3.03%)
L (3.03%)
J2a (3.03%)
J1 (9.095)
J2b1 (15.05%)
J2b1b (3.03%)
J2b (3.03%)
R1b1a (15.15%)
R2 (3.03%)
G2 (12.12%)
G1 (3.03%)

Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration
M. Regueiroa, A.M. Cadenasa, T. Gaydena, P.A. Underhillb, R.J. Herreraa

aDepartment of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, Fla., and
bDepartment of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., USA

According to this the Central Asian, Siberian etc...percentage are pretty much enough to refute that other claim.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:21 AM   #334

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Look I'm not necessarily defending the Iranian study I don't know how accurate it is but I wouldn't just dismiss it as propaganda because it doesn't agree with you.

The above thing you posted, just looks like a bunch of numbers to me so I don't know how you're interpreting it.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:23 AM   #335
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Just as it looks to me, as I said I do not know about this, but from what I read they are showing a good amount of eastern percentage.

And its surely more reliable than an Iranian research.

Last edited by Qaraqoyunlu; November 15th, 2012 at 06:32 AM.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:24 AM   #336

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Where does it say that and do you have a link to the actualy site and a place where they interpret the data?
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:28 AM   #337
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Iran: tricontinental nexus for Y-chromosome driven... [Hum Hered. 2006] - PubMed - NCBI

At least doing some quick google research shows that many of the hablogroups shown above connects to Central Asia - Siberia.

Last edited by Qaraqoyunlu; November 15th, 2012 at 06:59 AM.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:35 AM   #338

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Well this website links to the same article that Rustam posted. This study surveyed 150 people. This is what they said about it.

Quote:
Due to its pivotal geographic position, present day Iran likely served as a gateway of reciprocal human movements. However, the extent to which the deserts within the Iranian plateau and the mountain ranges surrounding Persia inhibited gene flow via this corridor remains uncertain. In order to assess the magnitude of this region's role as a nexus for Africa, Asia and Europe in human migrations, high-resolution Y-chromosome analyses were performed on 150 Iranian males. Haplogroup data were subsequently compared to regional populations characterized at similar phylogenetic levels. The Iranians display considerable haplogroup diversity consistent with patterns observed in populations of the Middle East overall, reinforcing the notion of Persia as a venue for human disseminations. Admixture analyses of geographically targeted, regional populations along the latitudinal corridor spanning from Anatolia to the Indus Valley demonstrated contributions to Persia from both the east and west. However, significant differences were uncovered upon stratification of the gene donors, including higher proportions from central east and southeast Turkey as compared to Pakistan. In addition to the modulating effects of geographic obstacles, culturally mediated amalgamations consistent with the diverse spectrum of a variety of historical empires may account for the distribution of haplogroups and lineages observed. Our study of high-resolution Y-chromosome genotyping allowed for an in-depth analysis unattained in previous studies of the area, revealing important migratory and demographic events that shaped the contemporary genetic landscape.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:55 AM   #339
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Yes, it says Iran is overall very diverse and there was alot of movements and migrations to that land.

Last edited by Qaraqoyunlu; November 15th, 2012 at 07:11 AM.
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:58 AM   #340

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Didn't really mention anything about Central Asia.
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