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Old November 3rd, 2012, 10:23 AM   #171
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Originally Posted by hazratemahmood View Post
I am not saying that you are wrong. If someone wants to refer to the planet earth, to the object on which we live on it is called "Zam" in Avestan, "Ksam" in old Indic and "Zamin" in Persian, if one refers to the general environment, clime or homeland, it is called "Bumi" in Avestan and "Bum" in Persian, or "Bhumi" in old Indic. Both of these are translated as 'earth' in this article: www.fas.harvard.edu/~iranian/OldAvestan/index.html

You should also note that Avestan and Sanskrit are sister languages (I mean Avestan is not a daughter language of Sanskrit, as most people believe), and chronologically belong to the same stages of development in the Indo-Iranian languages.
shukriya , hazrat muhammad.

There was a book in which I read a line which was in avestan and could have been misread as sanskrit so close was the connection.

Avestan and sanskrit are inded sister languages and I have never thought Avestan as daughter language, it is nearly( now this nearly is correct) as old as Sanskrit.


BTW, Dost do you think Achaemenids used airyaairyaputra( arya aryaputra in sanskrit) somewhere?

I read it somewhere but could not verify it.
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Old November 4th, 2012, 04:02 AM   #172

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The Persians apparently had a penchant for truncating off consonants or vowels. For instance, Shahputra (son of king, i.e. prince) became just Shapur. While Khashayar Shah (King Khashayar) became Khshayarsha, which the Greeks then rendered simply as Xerxes, since it seemed to roll off their tongue easier.

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the sanskrit word for land is Bhumi and that for earth is Prthvi and it is from this malayas use term 'bHUMIPUTRA' meaning sons of soil.

what is so funny about it?
Not funny ha ha, but funny strange. You gotta be able to see the context of something. Speaking of context, 'earth' in English can refer to either: (1) the planet in its entirety; or (2) the local soil, as in 'a bag of earth'; or (3) the element 'earth' in ancient 'science', which proposed the world as made up of 4 elements, i.e. 'earth', 'wind', 'fire' and 'water'.

I believe 'prthvi' could have carried more than one meaning too, depending on context. Two Indian designed missiles, for instance, were named Prthvi and Agni. Since 'agni' means 'fire', i.e. the element 'fire', then 'prthvi' in the context of the Prthvi missile would also have meant 'earth' the element, rather than 'earth' the planet. Again, context is the key word, my friend.

Same thing in Malay, 'bumi' (whether it came from Sanskrit or Old Persian) is used to mean either the planet or the land, i.e. country or territory.

Last edited by Dreamhunter; November 4th, 2012 at 04:34 AM.
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Old November 7th, 2012, 09:30 PM   #173
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I wanted to share this research with you.
(from the wayback machine since the site no longer exists)

http://web.archive.org/web/201106052...ol83No1/39.pdf

According to this research, Europeans that are genetically most close to Turkish people are the British. Turkish people are genetically more close to British people than other Central Asian Turkic populations and also people that were Turks or had a high percentage of Turkic elements in their roots in the past like Bulgarians or Hungarians.

Last edited by ancalimon; November 7th, 2012 at 10:48 PM.
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Old November 7th, 2012, 09:49 PM   #174

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How strange, I suppose I'm more Turkish than I thought.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 07:06 AM   #175
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How strange, I suppose I'm more Turkish than I thought.
Why? Are you British?
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Old November 9th, 2012, 07:15 AM   #176

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Originally Posted by ancalimon View Post
I wanted to share this research with you.
(from the wayback machine since the site no longer exists)

http://web.archive.org/web/201106052...ol83No1/39.pdf

According to this research, Europeans that are genetically most close to Turkish people are the British. Turkish people are genetically more close to British people than other Central Asian Turkic populations and also people that were Turks or had a high percentage of Turkic elements in their roots in the past like Bulgarians or Hungarians.
they never take my DNA in these tests
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Old November 9th, 2012, 07:43 AM   #177
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they never take my DNA in these tests
Just what I think.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 08:01 AM   #178
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they never take my DNA in these tests
You just happen to be at the right place at the right time.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 08:16 AM   #179

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Originally Posted by ancalimon View Post
According to this research, Europeans that are genetically most close to Turkish people are the British. Turkish people are genetically more close to British people than other Central Asian Turkic populations and also people that were Turks or had a high percentage of Turkic elements in their roots in the past like Bulgarians or Hungarians.
No frekkin wonder. I always thought that David Cameron might have some distant Asiatic-Mediterranean genes in him. Just darken his hair, eyes and skin a shade or two, and he could easily stroll through any street in Istanbul without getting a second look.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 08:20 AM   #180

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My friends often compare me with British and they say i look like them.But i know about my Slavo-Turkic roots.
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