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Old November 6th, 2012, 04:06 AM   #11

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Yes, I was there because my father was a military man
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Old November 7th, 2012, 10:41 PM   #12

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Another place I visited recently was Hoşap castle in Van. It dates from 1643 and was built by Mahmudi Suleyman, so it's way after Seljuk times actually.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

It's in very good condition, I'm not sure what if any significance the lions on the gate are. It must have included a big area beforehand because you can see parts of the castle around the village next to it.

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Old November 8th, 2012, 01:11 AM   #13

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ayazid View Post
Nice photos! Seljuk architecture was clearly very Iranian in its character, unlike the Ottoman one, which assimilated a lot of Byzantine influences. It's interesting that the most characteristic Ottoman type of mosques with domes is modelled after Hagia Sophia.

I am not sure if there are many significant Ottoman period buildings in central Anatolia.
There are of course, so we should open a new thread on the subject.
I now feel curious about Iranian architecture more.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 01:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antocya View Post
Another place I visited recently was Hoşap castle in Van. It dates from 1643 and was built by Mahmudi Suleyman, so it's way after Seljuk times actually.

It's in very good condition, I'm not sure what if any significance the lions on the gate are. It must have included a big area beforehand because you can see parts of the castle around the village next to it.
The castle looks solid. Lions on the gate? IIRC, the Turkic cultures view the Wolf as a sacred animal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Efendi View Post
There are of course, so we should open a new thread on the subject.
I now feel curious about Iranian architecture more.
Ya, Iranian architecture is beautiful no doubt. I think the most famous Mughal period building in India is the Taj Mahal, but my favourite one is Sikandra - the tomb of Akbar, it is also located in the city of Agra.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 01:29 AM   #15

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I was really struck by how completely devoid of color the village was.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 02:25 AM   #16
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Beautiful pictures, thanks for uploading.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 02:57 AM   #17
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about Hoşap castle http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoşap_Castle : The Armenian older may have had only two walls, one on the site of the keep and one on the line of the intermediate wall. In the first reconstruction of the Ottoman period (in 1649: crude masonry, except for entrance tower) the outer wall was built or possibly rebuilt: the keep certainly, and the intermediate wall probably, were rebuilt. A repair followed (perhaps after 1650) in the neatest stone, including part of the outer curtain n. of the entrance-tower and a small expanse in the keep.
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about the 2 lions : you have to search of the use of the castle during the Roman/Byzantine era, they have propably been added later taken from elements survived from the the Roman/Byzantine era, and added to the gate> i know that for some special buildings/castles or bridges roman/byzantines taken some of the best special workers from specific areas of the empire[some of them were also soldiers] , and the same did seljuck and in a value ottomans too.

The easterly stretch, facing away from the road, has relatively small towers, and the layout, bur probably not the present masonry, may well be that of a medieval Armenian older one.
But unless the early building's styling and in deverse the 2 lions describe the descent and presence of early workers made the work [and possible guarding as mercernary or standard] to the earlier period[=byzantine] of the building.
it would help if archeology told us of what excact century those lions have been made.

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Most of the surviving today structure was built by a local Kurdish lord named Mahmudi Suleyman in 1643, who, according to a tradition, when just finished building the castle, Suleyman cut off the hands of foreman Tillma for being unable to make another such beautiful castle.

(to my source the local Kurdish lord named Sari Suleyman . it's refered -the source- also for the ancient Urartu period of a first made fortification).
-------------------------

Last edited by ANAX; November 8th, 2012 at 03:04 AM.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 03:42 AM   #18

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Thanks a lot for the information. I also visited an Urartu period place nearby, Çavuştepe. Because Urartu was so ancient, there wasn't really much to see but the location high up in the mountains was amazing.

Click the image to open in full size.

The basalt temple was the only thing in good condition, with some cuneiform writing visible.

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They also had what might be the oldest toilet in existence.

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Old November 8th, 2012, 05:48 AM   #19
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ANAX, you're right. The hands of the architect were cut off according to our understanding.

More pictures:

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Old November 8th, 2012, 12:37 PM   #20

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Those are some great photos, I wasn't able to get it from that perspective. Do you know anything about the ruler who built it?
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