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Old January 7th, 2013, 06:29 PM   #1
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Portuguese-ya'aruba Imamate war


The Ya'aruba Imamate managed to expel the Portuguese from Muscat after years of their rule over Oman, and even chased them across the seas into India and East africa. They repeatedly defeated the Portuguese navy off the indian and east african coasts and conquered their colonies from kenya to tanzania until they reached mozambique, and almost took that as well.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 01:26 AM   #2

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Just for the record Portugal lost its independence to Spain in 1580 when Phillip II inherited the Portuguese crown. The restoration war lasted from 1640 to 1668 and by that time Portugal was not only at war with Spain but also with the enemies of Spain, England and the Netherlands, who were praying on Portuguese colonies, you can add the Ottomans to the list and you have the four most powerful empires at the time, though of these Portugal was not at war with England after the restoration. There is also the matter that Portuguese naval resources had been exausted by the Spaniard during the Iberic union. Now no matter how brave the Portuguese were it's pretty obvious something had to go, so you can also add the loss of other territories like Ceuta to Spain, Tangier to England, and Indian territories to the Dutch. Some like Tangier were not even lost but given to appease the adversaries and restore alliances.
By the 18th Century the natural alliance with the English and Dutch against the Spanish and French was already restored.
The Ottoman-Portuguese conflicts:
Ottoman

Portuguese Dutch Wars:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch%E...Portuguese_War

Portuguese restoration war:
Portuguese_Restoration_War Portuguese_Restoration_War

The dowry of Tangier and Bombay Islands (check out the legacy to see why the Brits drink tea):

Catherine_of_Braganza Catherine_of_Braganza

Last edited by Yōḥānān; January 8th, 2013 at 01:53 AM.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 08:48 AM   #3

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I must apologize because the Ottoman War I posted above had nothing to do with this subject and happened a century earlier.
Can't find much info on the Internet about this but read in Saturnino Monteiro's book on the Portuguese naval battles how Rustaq Murshid Al Ya'rubi elected in 1624 united the tribes in the region, declared Holy War against Portugal, and attacked Portuguese cities there eventually his sucessor Saif Ya'rubi took the already undefended city of Muscat in 1650. The Persians favoured the Portuguese presence and wanted them to stay there so long a powerful enough contigent was left to keep order in the region, they wanted the base to be at Henjam (Angćo), but the Portuguese refused because there was no water there and would have to depend on the Persians.
I need to read more about this but it seems through the exchange of knowledge and the ships captured Oman got a strong navy and became a force to be reckoned in the region.

Last edited by Yōḥānān; January 8th, 2013 at 09:03 AM.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 02:40 PM   #4

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After researching about this I'm sorry to say but what is writen at the OP is not entirely true. Despite Oman becoming a considerable naval force and having promoted rebelion in the vicinities and even successfuly attacked and ravaged Diu in 1668 most of this was reversed or avenged except the conquering of Muscat. The retaking of the city was attempted several times but failed. They were also able to prevent the construction of a new fortress at Khasab. However the Oman fleet was defeated by the Portuguese in 1652, and defeated several times latter with the more relevant losses happening in Surat 1704 and in the Persian Gulf 1719.

Last edited by Yōḥānān; January 8th, 2013 at 03:10 PM.
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Old January 8th, 2013, 05:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yōḥānān View Post
After researching about this I'm sorry to say but what is writen at the OP is not entirely true. Despite Oman becoming a considerable naval force and having promoted rebelion in the vicinities and even successfuly attacked and ravaged Diu in 1668 most of this was reversed or avenged except the conquering of Muscat. The retaking of the city was attempted several times but failed. They were also able to prevent the construction of a new fortress at Khasab. However the Oman fleet was defeated by the Portuguese in 1652, and defeated several times latter with the more relevant losses happening in Surat 1704 and in the Persian Gulf 1719.

Oman succesfully reconquered zanzibar and the tanzanian and kenyan coastal cities such as mombasa, the area is now known as the Swahili coast.

Zanzibar: Its History and its People - W.H. Ingrams - Google Books

East Africa (British): Its History, People, Commerce, Industries, and Resources - Google Books

The Rise of Great Britain and Russia: 1688-1715/25 - John Selwyn Bromley - Google Books

The arabs were not a significant naval military power before the portuguese came and colonized muscat, the subsequent omani reconquest of muscat and conquest of east africa was something that never happened before in the history of arabia. There were arab traders in east africa before portugal but they were not there as a military power. Oman was the first arab maritime empire.

There is still a portuguese fortress in muscat and the portuguese fort jesus in mombasa in kenya, both of which were besieged and taken by the Omanis.

Last edited by deke; January 8th, 2013 at 06:03 PM.
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Old January 9th, 2013, 05:00 AM   #6

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Mombasa was recovered for a very short while but in the end all fell under the influence of the Oman Sultanate. From what I understand it was the Portuguese who introduced the influence of Oman Arabs in those regions.
It seems Arabs there were dispersed and never united to form a relevant power before the rise of Oman.
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Old January 11th, 2013, 10:54 AM   #7

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Didn't know there was an English edition, this is where I took my info:

The Miracle of «Restoration» 1627-1668: Amazon.co.uk: Saturnino Monteiro: Books
The Miracle of «Restoration» 1627-1668: Amazon.co.uk: Saturnino Monteiro: Books


I also used the following volume but it seems it hasn't been published.
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