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Old January 25th, 2013, 06:52 AM   #1
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How would language issues be sorted out by a Kurdish nation


How would dialectal differences, script differences, religious(different sects of Kurds) be resolved in a Kurdish nation?
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Old January 25th, 2013, 07:52 PM   #2

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How would dialectal differences, script differences, religious(different sects of Kurds) be resolved in a Kurdish nation?
Is that all you want to know? Answer this question, and you solve 95% of the worlds problems. It's a toughie, for sure. First, assuming they get autonomy, create a parliament, isn't that how most decisions are made, by governing bodies? On the other hand democracy is a Western invention. I'm not so sure it's for everyone.
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Old January 25th, 2013, 08:27 PM   #3

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The Kurds I work with can't agree on the time of day.
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Old January 25th, 2013, 10:49 PM   #4

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Sorani is the most common dialect in Iraqi Kurdistan and spoken in the main urban centers in Erbil and Suleimaniyah and Kirkuk and Kurmanji is spoken in a smaller region around Duhok so I think Sorani would be the more logical choice if there was preference given for an official language there. However, I don't know what the situation is there. The Arabic script is used for Kurdish in Iraq. I don't think there's much of an issue with religion there among Kurds.

I know in Turkey with the Kurdish language only recently being offered in some universities there's a shortage of qualified teachers able to teach the language and that's likely an issue in Iraq too but I don't really know.

If you're talking about a hypothetical greater Kurdistan then of course that would be different but I can't really see that happening in our lifetimes.
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Old January 25th, 2013, 11:12 PM   #5
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The Kurds I work with can't agree on the time of day.
ahaha. That's kind of a Middle Eastern thing.

**

It does not seem quite possible - Sorani and Kurmanji (most common dialects of Kurdish) have great differences which make the speakers do not understand each other well ( The degree of intelligibility is not very high). But that should not be a matter if they really want to unite, which also seems impossible. I mean, we should not be talking about this unless we hypothize that they want to unite, right?

I don't think Iraq Kurdistan likes the idea of unification with the North ~ They certainly do not want to lose their power to the comparatively more educated, political and more in number Northern Kurds of Turkey, which also explains the close relationship Turkey and Iraq Kurdistan have gotten into. Kurds of Turkey are aware of this fact as well and they know that such unification will bring about more problems than advantages, i.e. losing power, different culture and expectations (a Kurd of Turkey sees their future in Istanbul, not in Arbil), instability (the tension between the Iraq Kurdistan and the Baghdad government does not seem to cool down and probably won't for a long time),the entire politics of Kurds of Turkey is based on Kurmanji nationalism which contradicts with the Sorani.


Yeah.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 01:38 AM   #6

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The Kurmanji dialect is by far the most widespread and the most pure and conservative form of Kurdish, so I guess in a unified Kurdish state it will have the official status. But Sorani is more standardized and has produced more literature, at least if you count the Hewrami texts of the early 16th and 17th centuries as a part of the Sorani corpus.

The degree of mutual intelligibility among these dialects are very high (despite what people have stated here), at least from what I have observed among Iranian Kurmanji and Hewrami speakers they had no difficulty communicating in an everyday manner; despite some scientific works which state that Hewrami ( and Zazaki ) are not even Kurdish. But exceptions exist, for example the Laki dialect is not at all intelligible for a typical Kurd, but that is not an issue in a political setting since they are not a sizable community and at times think of themselves as Lurs.

Regarding the political struggle of the Kurds I have nothing to add to the previous comments.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 03:16 AM   #7
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Can a new Proto Kurdish language be created


Firstly my question was in linguistic context if all Kurdish areas in Turkey,Iran, Iraq and Syria form a new nation called Kurdistan. This assuming to be a secular democratic state with non Arabs like Assyrians constituting as protected minorities. Assuming this to be somewat of a socialist state.

Now the main question, what would be the script(Cyrillic,Roman,Perso-Arab) and what about the Kurdish language.

I propose a solution that either a new Proto Kurdish language be created which borrows liberally from all dialects. Or dialectal differences get respected and a multi lingual Kurdish population be developed through educational system. This would involve Sorani and Kurmanji speakers to learn Sorani and Kurmanji compulsorily, along with English as a language of instruction for science and other secular subjects. Kurdish history and culture be also taught to all. For those who speak a different dialect other than Sorani and Kurmanji; they must choose to learn one of these two dialects apart from their own native dialect. Plus they should also learn English.

Now to come to the script. Considering that a vast majority of Kurds are Kurmanji speakers(roughly 70% I believe) and they also have a handicap of having a less developed and standardised literature, hence, they start with some handicaps even in the above proposed model. Now to equalise the playing field, between them and Soranis, I propose a Roman script that Kurmanji speakers in Turkey use. Cyrillic is used by only fringe Kurdish people in Soviet areas. Hence, it is not even an option. Since Perso-Arabic would be a tougher script to adopt than vice-versa plus using Roman script would allow Soranis to adopt western languages also quickly is an added advantage. For somewhat more religious minded Kurds, they can choose to learn Persian and Arabic in the Madrasahs, if they want but outside the main schooling system.

Non Kurdish minorities must also learn one of the 2 main Kurdish dialects along with their own tongue and English. All official documents could be published in both Sorani and Kurmanji. Or it could be writen originally in English and then translated to the two tongues. The use of English would help uniting disparate linguistic groups through a common medium and at the same time help in making Kurds more accessible to international job market.

I believe this would permanently solve all linguistic, cultural barriers between the Kurds. Your thoughts on my solution to this problem?Any suggestions, improvements or modifications to the same, kindly state.Thanks.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 03:20 AM   #8

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what about zazaki? are zazas kurds?
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Old January 26th, 2013, 03:41 AM   #9
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Read my post fully, it speaks of all Kurdish groups.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 06:22 AM   #10

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Originally Posted by greatstreetwarrior View Post
This assuming to be a secular democratic state with non Arabs like Assyrians constituting as protected minorities.
Kurds do not tend to be that tolerant towards the Christians. This can be seen already in the pages of history which concern the Assyrian and Armenian [massacres] in the ottoman empire. Similar thing is still going on in the Iraqi Kurdistan.

The Kurds are not that much different from other middle easterners and when they have the upper hand they act in the exact same way and start oppressing minorities.
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