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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old December 9th, 2017, 05:16 AM   #11

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i saw a video once of a lioness capturing a baby gazelle and not eating it. And defending it from other lions.
There were all sort of theories about the episode, some said it was a grieving mother that has lost her baby and used the gazelle as a surrogate.
some said that she was using the baby as an hostage to lure bigger gazelles into rescuing it in the hope of eating more meat. don't remember in the end what happened to the baby but i don't think you could consider it a pet-relationship.

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Old December 9th, 2017, 07:27 AM   #12

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Originally Posted by gustavolapizza View Post



i saw a video once of a lioness capturing a baby gazelle and not eating it. And defending it from other lions.
There were all sort of theories about the episode, some said it was a grieving mother that has lost her baby and used the gazelle as a surrogate.
some said that she was using the baby as an hostage to lure bigger gazelles into rescuing it in the hope of eating more meat. don't remember in the end what happened to the baby but i don't think you could consider it a pet-relationship.
I don't know if this is the same story, but here they document a case of a lioness keeping a baby antelope as a cat playing with prey.

https://www.livescience.com/34279-li...elope-kob.html
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Old December 9th, 2017, 07:42 AM   #13
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Correcting a howler is never off topic. Would an historian call an impi a legion or a Satrap a Bashaw?
Now you're just trolling actually... Wildlife isn't my area of specialty. Your post however is quite off topic. I'd suggest you return to the topic at hand before the thread gets locked.

The point stands. You haven't neutered anything, what the animals were was never my point, you're coming off as being disgruntled, and you should probably stop that before you get yourself into trouble.

Last edited by orestes; December 9th, 2017 at 08:13 AM.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 07:46 AM   #14

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also two other factors to considers are:

- you can have a true "pet relationship" only with domesticated animals.

- pets in the end are mouths to feed, therefore you can have them only when you have abundance of food, i think it's proven that men started having pets after when they turned from hunters to farmers.

both conditions as far as i know don't exists in nature apart from humans.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 07:57 AM   #15
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Most symbiotic relations get a free feed such as barnacles on a whale. In neither of the aforementioned cases do these relations hurt the arthropod or the animal. In fact the relationship is beneficial to both barnacles and the whale. The barnacles act as a filtration system while the whale gets a free feed of filtered food.

In the sense of a human, there is a symbioses where the dog provides protection, friendship, and assistance. In any case its beneficial to both the dog and the human, or else the relationship would have never been formed in the first place.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 08:00 AM   #16

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Most symbiotic relations get a free feed such as barnacles on a whale. In neither of the aforementioned cases do these relations hurt the arthropod or the animal. In fact the relationship is beneficial to both barnacles and the whale. The barnacles act as a filtration system while the whale gets a free feed of filtered food.

In the sense of a human, there is a symbioses where the dog provides protection, friendship, and assistance. In any case its beneficial to both the dog and the human, or else the relationship would have never been formed in the first place.
Good point. I guess the origins of pets comes from humans and wild dogs and/or cats helping one another.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 08:25 AM   #17

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I cannot think of any example of any animal, excepting us, using another animal as a pet. However, there are examples of one animal using another to it's advantage. Ravens use wolves, and sometimes cougars, to hunt for them, and to open the carcass of an already dead animal as ravens cannot rip open the hide of an animal. Observation shows that the prime mover in this relationship is the raven, therefore "dominant" and so creating in effect a master - servant relationship with the wolf being the servant, if not a pet in the usual sense of the word.
The relationship between wolves and ravens is a true symbiosis rather than a relationship where one species benefits and the other doesn't. While the ravens do indeed benefit from wolves cracking open a carcass for them, ravens have been observed leading wolves to injured animals or carcasses. That ravens also lead wolves to meals is likely why the wolves tolerate ravens sharing in the feast, something they would not do for other scavenging animals. It's a partnership between the two species and a fascinating one.

This is probably more along the lines of what the OP was looking for:

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Old December 9th, 2017, 08:27 AM   #18

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I cannot think of any example of any animal, excepting us, using another animal as a pet. However, there are examples of one animal using another to it's advantage. Ravens use wolves, and sometimes cougars, to hunt for them, and to open the carcass of an already dead animal as ravens cannot rip open the hide of an animal. Observation shows that the prime mover in this relationship is the raven, therefore "dominant" and so creating in effect a master - servant relationship with the wolf being the servant, if not a pet in the usual sense of the word.
That's really amazing. I know some birds can do some fantastic stuff, like build a home for themselves out of leaves, straw etc., crack a tough nut open by whacking it with a stone, bury a dead comrade in earth (is this legend or fact?), mimic human speech. But this is something I hear for the first time. Thanks for the info.

BTW, how exactly does the raven make the wolf or the cougar hunt for it or open a carcass for it. Appreciate a further elaboration on these. Thanks.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 08:34 AM   #19

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Well, if we look at a pet as a kind of 'substitute kin', for want of a better phrase, then any animal adopting another species as their 'baby' or 'sibling' can be considered as kind of adopting a pet, kind of very broadly speaking.

I hv seen domesticated monkeys kind of 'friending' with a cat or a hen, in kind of a comradely, brotherly or fatherly way. Don't know if they do that kind of thing in the wild, though.

BTW, a cat can also make you open a door or window for it, by mewing incessantly at you and kind repeatedly looking in that particular direction. Perhaps kind of reversing the master-pet relationship temporarily.

Last edited by Dreamhunter; December 9th, 2017 at 08:43 AM.
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Old December 9th, 2017, 08:39 AM   #20

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BTW, how exactly does the raven make the wolf or the cougar hunt for it or open a carcass for it. Appreciate a further elaboration on these. Thanks.
Ravens will occasionally lead wolves to injured animals or carcasses that are upwind of them. The ravens aren't able to kill a bison with a broken leg for instance, or get into it's tough hide, but wolves can do both. The wolves in turn allow the ravens to feed at their kills, whereas they'd chase off or even kill other scavengers that tried to do the same.

Both species are benefiting however so I'd disagree that there is a master-servant relationship. It's a true symbiotic relationship. The two species also at times seem to enjoy each other's company. Wolves & ravens, both of which are highly intelligent and gregarious species, have been observed engaging in play behavior with each other.
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