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-   -   This Makes Three Craters - 12.9 BC (http://historum.com/natural-environment/24120-makes-three-craters-12-9-bc.html)

davu April 30th, 2011 05:40 PM

This Makes Three Craters - 12.9 BC
 
Clovis Age Crater Found in Canada: That Makes Three The Cosmic Tusk

now there are three --- map included

davu May 1st, 2011 05:28 AM

now linked to Venezuela -- scientists are working there bottoms off --

The Cosmic Tusk

Widdekind May 2nd, 2011 07:08 PM

Quote:

The 4-km diameter Corossol crater, near Sept-Iles, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada... joins two others, the Charity Shoal feature, and Bloody Creek in Nova Scotia, that also appear in this dramatic period... all three seem to come at the Pleistocene\Holocene transition [13 Kya]
http://cosmictusk.com/wp-content/upl...as-craters.bmp


Three detected impacts observed, b/c they hit land, not glacial ice-cover

Un-detected impacts could have cratered, and fractured, the Laurentide glacier, between the (modern) St. Lawrence, and Hudson's Bay:
http://img3.imageshack.us/img3/4258/cloviscomet.jpg
(Source: Nature)

davu July 10th, 2011 12:48 PM

Quote:

However ingeniously and with whatever subtlety we may deal with our evidence, the facts constrain us therefore to one inevitable conclusion, namely, that the Mammoth and its companions pershed by some wide-spread catastrophe which operated over a wide area and not through the slow processes of the ordinary struggle for existence, and that the greater portion of the remains we find in Siberia and Europe are not the result of gradual accumulation under normal causes for untold age, but the result of one of Nature's hecatombs on a grand and wide-spread scale, when a vast fauna perished simultaneouly.
Henry Howorth, 1887

quoted from Chaper 7, The Great Extinction by Paul A. LaViolette, PhD (Earth Underfire - Humanity's Survival of the Ice Age)

davu September 18th, 2011 06:43 PM

i brought this forward for you people interested in this 12.9 meteor -- lots of reading -- enjoy

larkin September 25th, 2011 01:25 PM

Although always a present danger, I think extinction level meteors happens less and less in our system. I,m sure it happened much more frequently one or two billion years ago. Jupiter and the other gas giants have acted as a huge vacuum.

All that being said, ...It could happen again and considering the appalling behavior of humans on this planet, it might not be a bad thing..

Naomasa298 September 25th, 2011 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by larkin (Post 767337)
All that being said, ...It could happen again and considering the appalling behavior of humans on this planet, it might not be a bad thing..

Really. You think that humanity should be destroyed then? Are you volunteering to be the first to go?

What good is the Earth to anything anyway, except for the life that inhabits it, of which we are currently the dominant life form?

larkin September 25th, 2011 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Naomasa298 (Post 767407)
Really. You think that humanity should be destroyed then? Are you volunteering to be the first to go?

What good is the Earth to anything anyway, except for the life that inhabits it, of which we are currently the dominant life form?

It's just dark sarcasm,...You know, like another brick in the wall...

skizzerflake October 1st, 2011 09:32 PM

If you want to add a level of weirdness to this speculation, throw in the Carolina Bays (AKA Delmarva Bays) of the US southeast. These things are usually NOT bays, but are shallow depressions along the coastal plain, very regularly elliptical, mostly oriented southeast to northwest, ranging from a couple hundred yards to several miles along the long axis of the ellipse. Before land was disturbed by development and farming, there were as many as 500,000 of them. In an aerial view they are uncanny. There are a bunch of weak theories about how they got there, but the one that doesn't have than at about 75-100 thousand years old has them at about 12.9K years old. If you want to survey a bunch go to Google Maps or Earth and look northwest of Wilmington NC along the river bed.

The Carolina Bays

http://abob.libs.uga.edu/bobk/rosscbay.jpg

http://www.googleearthanomalies.com/.../carolina1.jpg

Widdekind October 12th, 2011 12:24 AM

Perhaps there is a partial parallel, between the "Mammoth impact", 13 Kya; and, the "Dinosaur impact", 65 Mya (65,000 Kya). For, the latter sprayed ejecta debris into sub-orbital trajectories, generating a distributed "rain" of debris, whose passages through the atmosphere generated so much friction & heat, as to cause wide-spread fire-storms... akin to the "Black Matt" from the (much more recent) "Mammoth impact" ?
http://www.sciencephoto.com/image/17...nction-SPL.jpg

http://ircamera.as.arizona.edu/NatSc...s/extinct1.jpg


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