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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


View Poll Results: % that Man is influencing Climate Change?
None 13 10.32%
1% or less 12 9.52%
2-5% 14 11.11%
5-10% 10 7.94%
10-20% 13 10.32%
20-30% 6 4.76%
30-40% 6 4.76%
50-60% 8 6.35%
60-70% 5 3.97%
70-80% 10 7.94%
80-90% 11 8.73%
90-100% 18 14.29%
Voters: 126. You may not vote on this poll

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Old November 11th, 2012, 05:40 PM   #661

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For all those that deny global warming, the US Military is preparing for it despite the best efforts of opponents of global warming to defund global warming studies. This is from today's New York Times.


Quote:
. Climate Change Report Outlines Perils for U.S. Military

WASHINGTON — Climate change is accelerating, and it will place unparalleled strains on American military and intelligence agencies in coming years by causing ever more disruptive events around the globe, the nation’s top scientific research group said in a report issued Friday.

The group, the National Research Council, says in a study commissioned by the C.I.A. and other intelligence agencies that clusters of apparently unrelated events exacerbated by a warming climate will create more frequent but unpredictable crises in water supplies, food markets, energy supply chains and public health systems.

Hurricane Sandy provided a foretaste of what can be expected more often in the near future, the report’s lead author, John D. Steinbruner, said in an interview.

“This is the sort of thing we were talking about,” said Mr. Steinbruner, a longtime authority on national security. “You can debate the specific contribution of global warming to that storm. But we’re saying climate extremes are going to be more frequent, and this was an example of what they could mean. We’re also saying it could get a whole lot worse than that.”

Mr. Steinbruner, the director of the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland, said that humans are pouring carbon dioxide and other climate-altering gases into the atmosphere at a rate never before seen. “We know there will have to be major climatic adjustments — there’s no uncertainty about that — but we just don’t know the details,” he said. “We do know they will be big.”

The study was released 10 days late: its authors had been scheduled to brief intelligence officials on their findings the day Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast, but the federal government was shut down because of the storm.

Climate-driven crises could lead to internal instability or international conflict and might force the United States to provide humanitarian assistance or, in some cases, military force to protect vital energy, economic or other interests, the study said.

The Defense Department has already taken major steps to plan for and adapt to climate change and has spent billions of dollars to make ships, aircraft and vehicles more fuel-efficient. Nonetheless, the 206-page study warns in sometimes bureaucratic language, the United States is ill prepared to assess and prepare for the catastrophes that a heated planet will produce.

“It is prudent to expect that over the course of a decade some climate events — including single events, conjunctions of events occurring simultaneously or in sequence in particular locations, and events affecting globally integrated systems that provide for human well-being — will produce consequences that exceed the capacity of the affected societies or global system to manage and that have global security implications serious enough to compel international response,” the report states.

In other words, states will fail, large populations subjected to famine, flood or disease will migrate across international borders, and national and international agencies will not have the resources to cope.

The report cites the simultaneous heat wave in Russia and floods in Pakistan in the summer of 2010 as disparate but linked climate-related events that taxed those societies.

It also cites the Nile River watershed as a place where climate-related conflict over water and farmland could arise as the combined populations of Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia approach 300 million. South Korea and Saudi Arabia have purchased fertile land in the Nile watershed to produce crops to feed their people, but local forces could decide to seize the crops for their own use, potentially leading to international conflict, the report says.

The 18-month study is not the first such report from government agencies or research organizations to draw a direct link between climate change and national security concerns.

The National Intelligence Council produced a classified national intelligence estimate on climate change in 2008 and has issued a number of unclassified reports since then. The Pentagon and the White House have also highlighted the role of climate change in humanitarian crises and security threats.

The National Research Council recommends in the new report that all government agencies improve their ability to monitor the global climate and assess the risks to populations and critical resources around the world.

Yet Mr. Steinbruner said that as the need for more and better analysis is growing, government resources devoted to them are shrinking. Republicans in Congress objected to the C.I.A.’s creation of a climate change center and tried to deny money for it. The American weather satellite program is losing capability because of years of underfinancing and mismanagement, imperiling the ability to predict and monitor major storms.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 09:36 PM   #662

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pretty much says it all, doesn't it.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 09:19 AM   #663

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Pandas' bamboo food may be lost to climate change
Pandas' bamboo food may be lost to climate change - Technology & science - Science - LiveScience | NBC News

Quote:
In addition to their native habitats in China, pandas live around the world in zoos and breeding centers. But Liu doesn't predict a bright future for the bears if they lose their wild habitats.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 09:24 AM   #664

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Quote:
NYC flood was foreseen: Now what?
NYC flood was foreseen: Now what? - Cosmic Log

Quote:
Marine scientist Malcolm Bowman has been warning since before Hurricane Katrina that the New York metro area was susceptible to a catastrophic storm surge, but the fact that superstorm Sandy proved him right doesn't make him feel any better.
"It was all predictable, and unfortunately it all happened,” Bowman told me today. "But then it got worse."
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Old November 12th, 2012, 09:28 AM   #665

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Global warming felt by space junk, satellites
Global warming felt by space junk, satellites - Technology & science - Space - Space.com | NBC News

Quote:
However, in the highest reaches of the atmosphere, carbon dioxide can actually have a cooling effect. The main effects of carbon dioxide up there come from its collisions with oxygen atoms. These impacts excite carbon dioxide molecules, making them radiate heat. The density of carbon dioxide is too thin above altitudes of about 30 miles (50 kilometers) for the molecules to recapture this heat, which means it mostly escapes to space, chilling the outermost atmosphere. [ Earth's Atmosphere from Top to Bottom (Infographic) ]

Cooling the upper atmosphere causes it to contract, exerting less drag on satellites. Atmospheric drag can have catastrophic effects on items in space — for instance, greater-than-expected solar activity heated the outer atmosphere, increasing drag on Skylab, the first U.S. space station, causing it to crash back to Earth.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 09:28 AM   #666

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I remember reading about that, and seeing it on the tube many times the last 20 years or so. As often as I heard about New Orleans I think. It's doubly sad.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 01:11 PM   #667

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we require "proof" of such occurances and when it happens, the price is doublely high. there are times when we should listen to the "dutch" ---
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Old November 13th, 2012, 02:30 PM   #668

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this got me going -- the posting by Aulus Plautius with the NY Times -- one thing led to another -- now we have another website of impeccable resources to add ---

enjoy -- this website is just awesome -- joining is free and so are the downloads but you can also buy the books for reading pleasure (although some of the stuff is NOT pleasurable reading)

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

The National Academies Press

Sea-Level Rise for the Coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington: Past, Present, and Future=
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Old November 14th, 2012, 08:28 AM   #669

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Quote:
Previous Predictions Of Groundwater Flooding Doubles With Future Sea Level Rise
Groundwater Flooding Doubles Previous Predictions - Science News - redOrbit


Quote:
The authors will present the findings from this paper at two international meetings: the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC) and the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting (San Francisco, CA).
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Old November 15th, 2012, 06:21 AM   #670

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Quote:
32-Foot-Plus Waves From Hurricane Sandy Topple Records
32-Foot-Plus Waves From Hurricane Sandy Topple Records | Climate Central

Quote:
The harbor entrance buoy recorded a significant wave height of 32.5 feet at 8:50 pm on Oct. 29, beating the previous record set during Hurricane Irene by 6.5 feet! Records at that buoy extend only to 2008, which minimizes the historical significance of the record somewhat.
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