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Old April 25th, 2014, 11:01 AM   #1331
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Missing Link? Mississippi Floods, and a Great City Disappears | LiveScience

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The pre-Columbian settlement at Cahokia was the largest city in North America north of Mexico, with as many as 20,000 people living there at its peak.
Credit: Painting by Lloyd K. Townsend.
I've assumed this to be the case, since reading about the deforestation that occurred there. I'm a native to the area, and I can tell you that I have seen tons of flooding happens in modern times with our modern technology. I can only imagine what would have happened 800 years ago.
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:10 PM   #1332

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just some FYI from the TV show "COSMOS" and Kepler --- interesting

Kepler - Young Earth Creationist

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Archbishop James Ussher.

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Johannes Kepler - Young Earth Creationist
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William Thomson, Lord Kelvin.
Wrong by 4.3 billion years.
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Old April 25th, 2014, 06:21 PM   #1333

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so okamido and unclefred --- are we up for a little game changing on dates

[QUOTE]
Tempest Stela: World's Oldest Weather Report Could Change Ancient Timeline
[/QUOTE]


Tempest Stela: World's Oldest Weather Report Could Change Ancient Timeline
Quote:
The Tempest Stela dates back to the reign of the pharaoh Ahmose, the first pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty. His rule marked the beginning of the New Kingdom, a time when Egypt's power reached its height. Thebes, modern Luxor, was where Ahmose ruled.
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In 2006, radiocarbon testing of an olive tree buried under volcanic residue placed the date of the Thera eruption at 1621-1605 B.C. Until now, the archeological evidence for the date of the Thera eruption seemed at odds with the radiocarbon dating, explained Oriental Institute postdoctoral scholar Felix Hoeflmayer, who has studied the chronological implications related to the eruption. However, if the date of Ahmose's reign is earlier than previously believed, the resulting shift in chronology "might solve the whole problem," Hoeflmayer said.
or it would cause a complete uproar

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Old April 26th, 2014, 12:45 AM   #1334

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Originally Posted by davu View Post
just some FYI from the TV show "COSMOS" and Kepler --- interesting

Kepler - Young Earth Creationist

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Archbishop James Ussher.

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Johannes Kepler - Young Earth Creationist
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William Thomson, Lord Kelvin.
Wrong by 4.3 billion years.
50 bucks Afrocentrists will say these guys are black, in time.
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Old April 26th, 2014, 01:59 PM   #1335

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Egiptólogos catalanes hallan una estructura "enigmática" con una posible imagen primitiva de Jesús
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Carefully, someone closed the lid of the inkwell. At his side, had left two wooden shawms by Brand wrapped in cloth and tied with a bow. I was all set to enter the youth could relate her journey to the afterlife. "It's exciting," said the professor in Greek Conception Piedrafita, Member of the archaeological mission of Oxyrhynchus Egyptologist who heads Josep Padro , just returned from Egypt with the good taste to leave the relevant findings, among which also includes a Coptic paintings underground structure, ie, the first Christians.
The tomb of this type , their belongings buried with work "is exceptional," says Padro, and the proof is that the minister of Antiquities of Egypt, Mohamed Ibrahim, was responsible for advancing some results of this latest campaign of excavations in the ancient Egyptian city, driving the Catalan Society of Egyptology and the Universitat de Barcelona .
Padro, who helps in the Vanguardia.com blog about Egyptology Nihil Novum , reveals all the details of the new discoveries in Oxyrhynchus, a huge reservoir that "never fails to surprise," he says with an enigmatic smile, the style of sphinxes. "He has a very funny site like this, known to thousands of papyri found in the late nineteenth century, mostly in Greek, so far have not found any type with their tools."
What may seem a paradox, has now ceased to be. The tomb of the scribe, intact and well preserved, containing his little treasure. "The rich were buried with their jewels, and the poor with their working tools." And so the mission archaeologists have rescued forget a metallic ink included with surprise: it was full of ink. "It's black, and we could analyze it to know its composition," says Padró before stressing that the two shawms meticulously wrapped, waiting for the premiere the deceased in the afterlife.
A lack of inscriptions in the tomb of the scribe knows only what evidence remains archaeologists and his own corpse. "The anthropologist found that he was 16," says Egyptologist. Could be an apprentice? In the twenty-first century did not hesitate a moment, but as Piedrafita remember, at that age a man "and could have had children and take a few years of office." Currently, it is not clear historical era. "We could say that it belongs to the Roman-Coptic period," says cautiously Padró before remembering that "Coptic burials included grave goods", which would also explain the exceptional finding.

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The Coptic painting, covered with a protective layer, which is a figure of a young man in the act of blessing Mission Oxyrhynchus
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An enigmatic structure
Padró sphinx outlines another smile before revealing the discovery of what he calls an important "enigma". "The site of Oxyrhynchus has given us in past campaigns one Osireion (underground temple dedicated to the god Osiris, the few that remain), after thousands of votive fish (only so far as the main animals were mummified crocodiles, monkeys, ibis ... but no fish) and now a subterranean stone structure invoice incredibly good do not know what is, "says the director of the excavation, but whose importance seems unquestionable.
It is located in the middle of a beautiful portico with columns processional way, recently recovered, which crosses the city and linking the Nile with stunning Osireion. The excavation of the structure has been a pharaonic work, as covered with very heavy debris that undoubtedly "purposely placed" was. "An architect and an engineer have directed the spectacular work to clear debris have been up to 45 tons of stone," explains Padró.
Once the structure clear, came the surprise. "The walls are covered with five or six layers of paint, the last corresponding to the time of the early Coptic Christians." "There vegetal decoration, inscriptions have been copied, but not yet translated, and the figure of a young man, with curls, wearing a short tunic and with freehand as if to bless." For the Egyptologist "could be a very primitive image of Jesus Christ , "similar to those found in Roman catacombs, while not ruling out that it could correspond to a saint. Currently, the representation remains protected and is expected to writings can provide more light.
As in all fields, has been pending work for the coming year. "We do tastings picture to see if the lower layers give us more information on what this structure may be." However, they also will start a project to preserve the best possible Coptic paintings to be visitable in the future. Neither has been time to dig an adjacent structure that is accessed via a very worn steps. "We know what we can find," says Egyptologist enigmatic.
Padró continues describing the enclosure without hiding the passion that wakes you up. It is square, with four pillars and a size of 8 meters wide by 3.75 line, "every stone, very well fitted and niches where statues had probably slabs". "Could be another Osireion or Serapeum (temple of the god Serapis, the Hellenized form of Osiris, documented by the papyri but still has not been found)? "Padró wonders. "We do not know, but this discovery reminds us a lot," he reflects.
So much so that he spends most overlooked other discoveries, as a tomb filled with mummies from Roman times with painted cardboard. "No dig mummies expected this year," he says. The thousands of sacred fish found during the last two campaigns have also remained in the background, but was unable to avoid Padró reveal a confession arqueozoólogo who has worked with them preparing a counting method. "99% are Oxyrhynchus (the sacred animal of the goddess Taweret city, hence the name) but is that some of the sacred fishermen working in the temple and cheated trickled in between some rare species such as catfish "Funny Padró whispers, as if to keep secret so well guarded for centuries picaresque.
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Archaeologists find a scribe at Oxyrhynchus
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Old April 28th, 2014, 11:17 AM   #1336

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this might have been posted already -- if not -- enjoy

Kangaroo in 400-year-old manuscript could change Australian history - Telegraph

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A 16th century manuscript featuring an image that looks like a kangaroo could prove that Portuguese explorers discovered Australia before the first recorded European landing in 1606
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Old April 28th, 2014, 11:30 AM   #1337

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this might have been posted already -- if not -- enjoy

Kangaroo in 400-year-old manuscript could change Australian history - Telegraph

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I remember that this came out a couple of months ago. While I have no problem believeing the kangaroo theory, most are putting forth that the animal is actually an aardvark. Whether it is or not, I don't want to really hazard a guess.
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Old April 28th, 2014, 11:42 AM   #1338

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Almost 60 royal mummies discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings - Ancient Egypt - Heritage - Ahram Online
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A cache of royal mummies has been unearthed inside a rock-hewn tomb in the Valley of the Kings on Luxor's West Bank, Egypt's antiquities ministry announced on Monday.

The tomb contains almost 60 ancient Egyptian royal mummies from the 18th dynasty along with the remains of wooden sarcophagi and cartonnage mummy masks depicting the facial features of the deceased, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told Ahram Online.
Ibrahim explained that the excavation work was carried out in collaboration with Basel University in Switzerland.
Early studies reveal that the Heratic texts engraved on some of the clay pots found inside the tomb identify the names and titles of 30 deceased, among them the names of princesses mentioned for the first time – Ta-Im-Wag-Is and Neferonebo.
Anthropological studies and scientific examination of the found clay fragments will be carried out to identify all the mummies and determine the tomb's owner and his respective mummy, said Ali El-Asfar, head of the ministry's ancient Egyptian antiquities section.
The head of the Swiss archaeological mission – Swiss Egyptologist Helena Ballin – said that among the finds were well-preserved mummies of infant children as well as a large collection of funerary objects.
She said that remains of wooden sarcophagi were also unearthed, proving that the tomb was reused by priests as a cemetery.
Early examinations of the tomb reveal that it has been subjected to theft several times since antiquity, said Ballin
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Old April 28th, 2014, 11:54 AM   #1339

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A 16th century manuscript featuring an image that looks like a kangaroo could prove that Portuguese explorers discovered Australia before the first recorded European landing in 1606
Interesting. If you look at contemporary art featuring other animals there are inaccuracies quite often so it could be an aardvark or even some species of deer as mentioned in the article.

It isn't the first time that people have put Portugal forward as the first Europeans to see Australia, there's the map showing Jave le Grande which was suggested to be Australia as far back as the 19th century.

Java La Grande | Musings on Maps

Your post reminded me of another that I read a few days ago as well - long before the Soviets ever thought of attaching explosives to dogs for AT warfare, or the US had a stab at incendiary bats, an artilleryman of Cologne was suggesting the use of animals in combat;

Quote:
Create a small sack like a fire-arrow. If you would like to get at a town or castle, seek to obtain a cat from that place. And bind the sack to the back of the cat, ignite it, let it glow well and thereafter let the cat go, so it runs to the nearest castle or town, and out of fear it thinks to hide itself where it ends up in barn hay or straw it will be ignited.
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Fur flies over 16th century 'rocket cats' warfare manual | World news | theguardian.com
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Old April 30th, 2014, 04:21 PM   #1340

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From Stone Darts to Dismembered Bodies, New Study Reveals 5,000 Years of Violence in Central California | Western Digs
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From shooting their enemies with darts and arrows to crushing their skulls and even harvesting body parts as trophies, the ancient foragers of central California engaged in sporadic, and sometimes severe, violence, according to a new archaeological study spanning 5,000 years.
In an effort to understand life and death in one of the ancient West’s most populous regions, anthropologists conducted a landmark study of its dead, cataloging signs of violence found in burials between the Sierra Nevada and the San Francisco Bay, dating from historic times all the way back to 3000 BCE.
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Remains found in Contra Costa County, California, included a projectile point embedded in the bone. The burial was dated to between 500 amd 1500 BCE. (Photo by Randy Wiberg)
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