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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:49 AM   #351

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Real-Life Hobbit Face Revealed | Homo Floresiensis | LiveScience
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Researchers have revealed what the face of a controversial ancient human nicknamed "the Hobbit" might have looked like.
"She's not what you'd call pretty, but she is definitely distinctive," said anthropologist Susan Hayes, a senior research fellow at University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. The female doesn't have feminine-looking big eyes and she's lacking much of a forehead.
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Susan Hayes’ facial approximation of the female Hobbit.
CREDIT: University of Wollongong
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Old December 11th, 2012, 11:57 AM   #352

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About an hour and a half from my place:

What does all of this mean and why is the archaeological community enthusiastic about it? Hofriether, a biologist in DNA laboratory of the University of York in the United Kingdom says, "The results of this study are exciting, because they show that the hypothesis that the Clovis people were the first Native Americans, which has been the prevailing idea for the last decades, is wrong. Now researchers need to come up with a new model for the settling of the Americas."

So how did these early humans get here? Some new hypotheses are emerging indicating that the first to come to the Americas may have come by sea. As a History enthusiast, I am in ecstatic that I have been able to see history change in my lifetime.

Reflections on the Past: Archaeology in Oregon - Cannon Beach Gazette: Gazette Guide
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Old December 11th, 2012, 02:49 PM   #353

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Originally Posted by unclefred View Post
As a History enthusiast, I am in ecstatic that I have been able to see history change in my lifetime.
I just hope it plays out to some resolution during our time.

(Unlikely, because it seems that there is history out there, that is ridiculously older than anything previously thought.)
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Old December 12th, 2012, 03:29 AM   #354
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Roman settlement and possible prehistoric site uncovered in northern Italy

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First, the team confirmed what appeared to be evidence of a road and walls that indicated the presence of Roman buildings. According to the materials found on the surface and during farm work, the settlement could have existed more than 400 years from the first century B.C. to the third or fourth century A.D. The manuscript information indicated that it was very extensive....But as they "dug deeper" into their findings, the instruments' readings also revealed the presence of large circular features below the Roman site structures.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 05:37 AM   #355

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Originally Posted by unclefred Click the image to open in full size.
As a History enthusiast, I am in ecstatic that I have been able to see history change in my lifetime
i can't say "ditto" loud enough ---
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Old December 12th, 2012, 08:59 AM   #356

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When Homo sapiens hit upon the power of art | Science | The Observer
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Rail engineer Peccadeau de l'Isle was supervising track construction outside Toulouse in 1866 when he decided to take time off to indulge his hobby, archaeology. With a crew of helpers, he began excavating below a cliff near Montastruc, where he dug up an extraordinary prehistoric sculpture. It is known today as the Swimming Reindeer of Montastruc.
Made from the 8in tip of a mammoth tusk, the carving, which is at least 13,000 years old, depicts two deer crossing a river. Their chins are raised and their antlers tipped back exactly as they would be when swimming. At least four different techniques were used to create this masterpiece: an axe trimmed the tusk, scrapers shaped its contours; iron oxide powder was used to polish it; and an engraving tool incised its eyes and other details.
It is superbly crafted, wonderfully observed and shows that tens of thousands of years ago human beings had achieved a critical intellectual status. They had moved from making objects merely for physical use, such as stone axes, and had begun to create works that had no purpose other than to reflect the patterns and sights they were experiencing around them. Homo sapiens had discovered art.
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A reindeer bone engraved with two reindeer, part of the ice age art show at the British Museum. Photograph: British Museum
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Old December 12th, 2012, 09:01 AM   #357

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Iron Age Feast Found in England : Discovery News
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Remnants of an Iron-Age feast, including cattle skulls and 13 cauldrons, have been unearthed in Chiseldon, United Kingdom, according to a report in the latest British Archaeology
The discovery marks the largest grouping of early cauldrons ever found in Europe. One cauldron features a handle plate in the form of a cow's head; zoomorphic decoration is otherwise unknown on a British cauldron.
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Given that these cauldrons survived for over 2,000 years, it should come as no surprise that they were built to last.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 09:03 AM   #358

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Restoration of Roman tunnels gives a slave's eye view of Caracalla baths | Science | guardian.co.uk
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the middle of a patch of grass amid the ruins of the Caracalla baths in Rome, there is a staircase that takes visitors deep into the ground to a world resembling the lair of a James Bond villain.
"This is our glimpse at maniacal Roman perfection, at incredible hydraulic technology," said archaeologist Marina Piranomonte, as she descended and waved at a network of high and wide tunnels, each measuring six metres (20ft) high and wide, snaking off into the darkness.
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The temple to Mithras under the Caracalla baths. Initiates to the cult would line in a niche and be drenched in the blood of sacrificed bulls. Photograph: Chris Warde-Jones
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Old December 12th, 2012, 10:34 AM   #359

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Quote:
A reindeer bone engraved with two reindeer, part of the ice age art show at the British Museum. Photograph: British Museum
quoted from previous post by okimado

how about that, just as i'm reading "the mind in the cave" by David Lewis-Williams. he spends some pages writing just about that carving. it is a great read. halfway through it.
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Old December 13th, 2012, 10:22 AM   #360
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Did Lead Makeup Poison Samurai Kids & Topple Japan’s Shogunate?

'Led by the anatomist Tamiji Nakashima, the researchers unearthed the remains of 70 people from a samurai burial place in the ancient city of Kokura. After testing the concentration of lead in their bones, they determined that the women in the group had higher lead levels than the men; the children’s levels, meanwhile, were up to 50 times higher than their parents’. The most elevated levels showed up in those under age 3—a median of 1,241 micrograms of lead per gram of dry bone, or more than 120 times the minimum amount now believed to cause neurological disorders, behavioral problems and severe intellectual impairment.'
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