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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old September 18th, 2013, 09:41 AM   #981

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Epic Fire Marked ?Beginning of the End? for Ancient Culture of Cahokia, New Digs Suggest | Western Digs
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Excavations in the Midwest have turned up evidence of a massive ancient fire that likely marked “the beginning of the end” for what was once America’s largest city, archaeologists say.
The digs took place in southern Illinois, just meters away from the interstate highways that carve their way through and around modern-day St. Louis. But 900 years ago, this was the heart of Greater Cahokia, a civilization whose trade routes and religious influence stretched from the Great Lakes to the Deep South, and whose culture shaped the lifeways of the Plains and Southern Indians.
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An artist’s rendering depicts Cahokia’s city center at its prime (Painting by L. K. Townsend/Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site)
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Old September 18th, 2013, 09:44 AM   #982

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Who was eating salmon 45,000 years ago in the Caucasus? Neandertals probably not as rigid in their diet as thought
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Why did anatomically modern humans replace Neandertals in Europe around 40,000 years ago?
One hypothesis suggests that Neandertals were rigid in their dietary choice, targeting large herbivorous mammals, such as horse, bison and mammoths, while modern humans also exploited a wider diversity of dietary resources, including fish. This dietary flexibility of modern humans would have been a big advantage when competing with Neandertals and led to their final success.
In a joint study, Professor Hervé Bocherens of the University of Tübingen, Germany, together with colleagues from the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Saint Petersburg, Russia and the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, Belgium have found at a cave in the Caucasus Mountains indirect hints of fish consumption by Neandertals. The scientists challenge the hypothesis of evolutionary advantage of modern humans on basis of dietary choice. Bone analyses ruled out cave bears and cave lions to have consumed the fish whose remains were found at the Caucasian cave.
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The map shows the location of the Kudaro 3 cave in the Caucasian Mountains. (Credit: H. Bocherens/University of Tübingen)
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Old September 18th, 2013, 09:48 AM   #983

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Must have been global warming in the past.

Iron age horse found as Norway glacier melts - The Local
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"It shows that they were using horses for transport in the high alpine zone, in areas where we were quite surprised to find them," Lars Pilø, the head of snow archeology at Oppland council told The Local.

The find, which was made in August, is the latest of a string of discoveries archeologists have been making around the world, as global warming melts glaciers and ice sheets, leaving perfectly preserved relics behind.

"Even though the finds up there are fantastic, the background to the science is very serious," Pilø said. "Norwegian climate experts tell us that all the ice in the Norwegian high mountains will be gone by the end of this century, and of course that also adds an urgency to the work that we're doing."

Pilø, who is Danish, and his team have been concentrating their research around the Lendbreen glacier near Lillehammer, which he believes was used both for hunting and as a short cut over the mountains from the late iron-age to the early medieval period.

"When it gets hot in the summer, the reindeer will get pestered by horseflies, and when they get horseflies they move up to the ice, which made the ice excellent hunting grounds," he explained.

"The other reason that we have many finds is that people wold also cross the glaciers as a transport route over the mountains. You can imagine, if people went over ten times a year and dropped one thing every time, that adds up to a lot of items."

He said the horse whose bones they discovered was probably used to carry reindeer carcasses back off the mountains to the villages below.
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Iron age horse dung, bones and shoes -- Oppland County Council
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Old September 20th, 2013, 07:01 PM   #984
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Rubicon river rivalry in Italy to be settled with mock court case
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According to local historians in north-eastern Italy, the question of which modern waterway lays the greatest claim to being the famous river – or, at least, its closest descendant – is anything but settled.

On Saturday, in the usually peaceful town of San Mauro Pascoli, near Rimini, the centuries-old debate will be reopened in a mock trial that aims to deliver a verdict, once and for all, on the identity of the real Rubicon. It is a battle that pitches neighbouring towns against each other and divides impassioned locals into three equally zealous camps – one for each river in question.

Fierce as Caesar's battle with Pompey was, it may have nothing on this. The judge, however, is expected to draw the line at severed heads.
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An Aug. 7 article, but nothing about it since. Perhaps the jury's still out.
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Old September 21st, 2013, 07:23 PM   #985

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Archaeologists unearth earliest complete human figurine in Cyprus | Cyprus Mail
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EXCAVATIONS at Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos have uncovered the earliest complete human figurine currently known on Cyprus, the Antiquities Department said yesterday.
The age of the statue could range from 10,500 to 11,000 years old based on the fact it was discovered at a site that has been radio-carbon dated to between 8800-8600 BC.
The period marks the beginning of the Neolithic period in Cyprus at a time when the transition from hunting to farming economies was beginning throughout the Middle East.
“Taking the Neolithic Revolution into the Mediterranean zone, the occupants of Ayia Varvara-Asprokremnos carried cultural traditions and intensive resource procurement and manufacturing activity to the island some 11,000 years before the present,” said a statement from the department.
Click the image to open in full size.The figuring found at the Ayia Varvara-Asprokremmos site
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Old September 22nd, 2013, 02:11 PM   #986

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Odd tale of headless Norse men: Slaves buried with the rich
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About 1,000 to 1,200 years ago, a Viking man still in his 20s was laid to rest on a craggy island in the Norwegian Sea. A new analysis of his skeleton and others buried nearby — several without their heads — suggests a haunting possibility: Some of the dead may have been slaves killed to lie in the grave with their masters.
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Old September 22nd, 2013, 02:13 PM   #987

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Head of Goddess Aphrodite Statue Unearthed in Turkey | LiveScience
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A group of archaeologists has discovered a life-sized marble head of Aphrodite while uncovering an ancient pool-side mosaic in southern Turkey.
Buried under soil for hundreds of years, the goddess of love and beauty has some chipping on her nose and face. Researchers think her presence could shed light on the extent of the Roman Empire's wide cultural influence at the time of its peak.
Archaeologists found the sculpture while working at a site called Antiochia ad Cragum (Antioch on the cliffs), on the Mediterranean coast. The researchers believe the region, which is dotted with hidden inlets and coves, would have been a haven for Cilician pirates — the same group who kidnapped Julius Caesar and held him for ransom around 75 B.C
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The head of an Aphrodite sculpture was discovered in southern Turkey during archaeological excavations.
Credit: Michael Hoff, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
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Old September 22nd, 2013, 02:15 PM   #988

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Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life : Discovery News
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The skeletonized body of an Etruscan prince, possibly a relative to Tarquinius Priscus, the legendary fifth king of Rome from 616 to 579 B.C., has been brought to light in an extraordinary finding that promises to reveal new insights on one of the ancient world’s most fascinating cultures.
Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods.
“It’s a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans,” Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria.
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In the small vaulted chamber, the complete skeleton of an individual was resting on a stone bed on the left. A spear lay along the body, while brooches, on the chest indicated that the man was probably once dressed with a mantle.
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Old September 25th, 2013, 06:49 AM   #989
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I thought this was pretty interesting, just came in the news:

Terceira: Subaquatic pyramidal shaped structure found ? Azores | Portuguese American Journal

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9C0VabifwY]Giant Underwater Pyramid Found Near Azores Island (english subtitles) - YouTube[/ame]

They mention it has about 8000 square meters at its base. Seems kinda big.

(Not the best of subtitles I would say, but I think it's understandable )

Last edited by Lusus; September 25th, 2013 at 06:59 AM.
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Old September 25th, 2013, 10:51 AM   #990

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well, since that's about 200 feet below the surface -- easy diving range and the coordinates are known --- my my

the last time that was above surface level was in access of 13,000 bc. this is going to get real interesting


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