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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old December 7th, 2016, 03:43 PM   #601

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Humans are occasionally useful to wild animals, in this case pregnant moose.

Moose Elude Predators with Help from Humans

"In a strange new twist of nature and adaptability, moose now apparently can take advantage of human development and use it as a shield against predators."
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Old January 7th, 2017, 12:23 AM   #602

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critters of Sulawesi (Celebes) in Wallacea:

BBC - Earth - The strange Asian island where monkeys and marsupials meet
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Old January 7th, 2017, 04:28 PM   #603

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Scientists discover bees prefer warm violets in cool forests The birds foot violet (Viola pedata) has two, common, color forms when it blooms during the cool, Missouri, April. The concolor form makes flowers with five light violet-mauve petals. The flower of a bicolor plant has three mauve petals plus two top petals that are a deep, dark, funereal purple.
Co-researcher Retha Edens-Meier, Ph.D., a professor and research scientist in SLU's School of Education, using thermocouples, and a hypodermic tissue probe, learned that these dark petals are up to 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than the surrounding atmosphere when they stand in a pool of Spring sunlight. Bees, especially fuzzy females of Carlin's bee (Andrena carlinii), prefer to forage upside down on these flowers so their hind legs and bee butts are warmed by the dark petals as they drink nectar and collect pollen.
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Old January 12th, 2017, 08:11 AM   #604

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A new Gibbon species has been described in SW China:

'Star Wars gibbon' is new primate species - BBC News
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Old January 14th, 2017, 01:07 AM   #605

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Vampire bats turn to feeding on humans in Brazil:

https://www.newscientist.com/article...r-human-blood/
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Old January 25th, 2017, 01:49 PM   #606

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another attempt at assertion that the ivory bill is not extinct. | Heliyon Michael Collins, who works at the Stennis Space Center in southeastern Mississippi and has made researching the ivory-billed woodpecker a pet project of his for more than a decade, published his findings in the online journal Heliyon. In his study, Collins presents evidence - including three video that show birds he believes to be the ivory-billed woodpecker – that he says proves that the elusive bird is not extinct.
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Old January 25th, 2017, 09:37 PM   #607

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Quote:
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another attempt at assertion that the ivory bill is not extinct. | Heliyon Michael Collins, who works at the Stennis Space Center in southeastern Mississippi and has made researching the ivory-billed woodpecker a pet project of his for more than a decade, published his findings in the online journal Heliyon. In his study, Collins presents evidence - including three video that show birds he believes to be the ivory-billed woodpecker – that he says proves that the elusive bird is not extinct.
Here's another article I bumped into:

Extinct or not? New study claims 'extinct' ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive | Fox News
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Old January 27th, 2017, 08:41 AM   #608

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Adélie Penguin Numbers Increase As Result of Warming Weather : News : Nature World News Adélie penguins in East Antarctica are not complaining about climate change. The warmer temperatures are precipitating glacial melt, prompting the population of this type of penguins to increase. Research published in BMC Evolutionary Biology reveals that the Adélie penguin population is 135 times greater than it was 19,000 years ago, according to an official statement.

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Old January 30th, 2017, 05:46 PM   #609

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NZ Penguin species


Penguins are a unique group of flightless seabirds that are at home on land and in the sea. They are covered with a waterproof coat of dense, short and flattened feathers, and their wings are modified into flippers. On land they walk upright, standing up to one metre high, and in water they can swim rapidly and dive for food.
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Fiordland crested penguin / tawaki
Thirteen of the world’s 18 penguin species have been recorded in the New Zealand region (including the Ross Dependency). Nine of these species breed here.


A slight warming of sea temperatures in the past 50 years, which is thought to have forced vital food species such as krill further south.


Penguins: Sea and shore birds
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Old January 30th, 2017, 05:54 PM   #610

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Interesting fact: Despite their great ability to mimic the myriad colors of their surroundings, octopuses are colorblind. However, research has shown that their skin is covered with a layer of photoreceptor cells similar to those in their eyes. One theory is that the chromatophores, the pigment-filled skin cells in which they expand and contract to produce said colors, overlay these monochromatic photoreceptors, acting as gel filters that allow their bodies to, in a sense, see color.

It is unknown whether or not these photoreceptor cells are connected to the central brain (which oddly enough is wrapped around their esophagus). There are a large number of neuron clusters in each arm. These "arm brains" (if you will) can control the appendages independently from the central brain. For instance, arms continue to search for food and pull it back to the animal even after being severed from the body. In his book Other Minds (2016), Peter Godfrey-Smith compares the octopus's command of the arms to blinking and breathing in humans: "These are activities that normally happen involuntarily, but through attention you can assert control over them" (103). Therefore, it's very possible that, depending on the circumstances, chromatic changes can be controlled by both the central and arm brains.

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