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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old August 29th, 2014, 07:07 AM   #1

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Dinosaurs, Reptiles and Birds


Are so Birds like Reptiles with feathers and fly ability?

wha'ts the actual tree definition that links those three things?
Why we call Reptiles all the usually referenced , lizards , snakes, turtles, etc but then they include also birds and dinosaurs?
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Old August 29th, 2014, 07:20 AM   #2

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We use the terms lizards, etc, because these terms were created before there was knowledge regarding the actual evolutionary relationships of various species. Originally, marine mammals were called "fish".
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Old August 29th, 2014, 07:24 AM   #3

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Old August 29th, 2014, 07:30 AM   #4
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Birds are descendants of therapod dinosaurs. There are certain physiological links between them like feathers and hollow bones. Even though birds lay eggs and have scales (on their feet) I don't think they are considered reptiles.

Interestingly to get the walking motion for the T-rex from Jurassic Park, Spielberg used ostriches.

also from wiki (on the dinosaur - reptile connection):

Dinosaurs were traditionally classed as reptiles, although there is now substantial evidence that they did not, or did not all, manifest the typical characteristics of "common-parlance" reptiles, such as a sprawling posture, ectothermy ("cold-bloodedness"), and scales, rather than fur or feathers. In the common definition, a reptile is any amniote (a tetrapod whose egg has an additional membrane, originally to allow them to lay eggs on land) that is neither a mammal nor a bird.
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Old August 29th, 2014, 07:41 AM   #5

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Is it confusing or is it just my ignorance ? I fond different definitions on
Ine, someclassify as reptiles others say are not ...
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Old August 29th, 2014, 08:24 AM   #6
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It's not your ignorance, it's a bit confusing. It seems that the difference depends on the type of definition:

More from wiki:

A monophyletic definition of the clade including the above groups (reptiles) would also include dinosaurs and birds, since the common ancestor of all reptiles is also the common ancestor of birds and dinosaurs, as discussed below. However in common parlance birds are not considered to be reptiles, although like reptiles they have scutes (scales) on their feet and legs, and are oviparous (lay eggs).

[ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reptile"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reptile[/ame]
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