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Old March 23rd, 2015, 07:45 PM   #141

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Octopus tree (Didierea madagascariensis).

Didierea madagascariensis, [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_name"]commonly[/ame] known as the Octopus tree, is a [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species"]species[/ame] of [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Didiereaceae"]Didiereaceae[/ame] [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endemic"]endemic[/ame] to the [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madagascar_spiny_thickets"]spiny thickets[/ame] of southwestern [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madagascar"]Madagascar[/ame].It was first [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Species_description"]described[/ame] scientifically by the French botanist [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Ernest_Baillon"]Henri Ernest Baillon[/ame] in 1880. The [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_species"]type species[/ame] of the genus Didierea, it is a densely spiny [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Succulent"]succulent[/ame] and can grow up to 10 metres (33 ft) tall.

Is endemic of Madagascar.


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The Didierea madagascariensis consists of a large bush whose branches reach out to the sky. The terminal part of the branches has many , slightly succulent small leaves , used for the photosynthesis function, while the base of the trunk is generally more bare.

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The Didierea madagascariensis can form dense bushes or real mini-forests. The plant is threatened by grazing and deforestation in its small distribution area.

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A detail on the top of a stem full of leaves and the base of the trunk bare. In both cases, however, there are lots of thorns.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 07:57 PM   #142

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Aloe vaombe.

It is a species of succulent plant belonging to the family of the Aloes.

Aloe vaombe, the “Madagascar Tree Aloe” is one of the most exuberant and beatiful large tree aloes, making a stunning centerpiece specimen for a garden. Native to Madagascar, it grows un-branched to 12 feet or taller with large single rosettes growing to 5 feet diameter. Aloe vaombe has long smooth green leaves which are recurved with white teeth. These leaves are curved/cupped-shaped when viewed in cross section and take on a deep red color in cold or sun.

Aloe vaombe has bright deep red flowers are borne in erect branched racemes in mid-winter, attracting bees and birds. Plant it in full sun and water it sparingly once established, though plants grow much faster fuller with regular irrigation. This large tree Aloe from Madagascar native to dry thornscrub in southern Madagascar limestone soils comes where it.

Aloe vaombe is drought-resistant, drought-tolerant, and handles most soil types and a variety of climates. It is somewhat cold hardy but not below 25°F as proven in Southern California during our January 2007 cold spell, when temperatures dropped to that level for 3 successive nights. Ironically, this plant did better than Aloe bainesii (Aloe barberae) in similar frost exposure.

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Old March 23rd, 2015, 08:04 PM   #143

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Ambositra.
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Old March 23rd, 2015, 08:21 PM   #144

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Lemur lunching and doing a garbage dump...ja, ja

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Old March 23rd, 2015, 09:43 PM   #145
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Is fossa the biggest recent land predator on Madagascar, or merely the biggest extant one?
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Old March 24th, 2015, 10:18 AM   #146

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Is fossa the biggest recent land predator on Madagascar, or merely the biggest extant one?

The fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox) is the biggest Madgascar native predator par excellence, chornedsnorkack.

That is of this way because there are no other carnivorous mammals on the island. So, the fossa is the dominant predator in the same way that it is the second main hunter lemurs.

The first one is the man, regrettably.

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The inspiration source of this thread...Ja, ja, Ja....

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Old March 24th, 2015, 01:34 PM   #147
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The biggest native mammalian predator of Australia is tiger quoll, and it is no bigger than the extant fossa. The biggest land predator of Australia is actually a monitor lizard.

Yet Australia has a diversity of extinct predators. Tasmanian devil (extant in Tasmania, extinct on mainland), thylacine... and marsupial lions.

Madagascar had the giant fossa. But was that all?

Did Madagascar have any land predator capable of killing an adult aepyornis?
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Old March 24th, 2015, 02:44 PM   #148

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
The biggest native mammalian predator of Australia is tiger quoll, and it is no bigger than the extant fossa. The biggest land predator of Australia is actually a monitor lizard.

Yet Australia has a diversity of extinct predators. Tasmanian devil (extant in Tasmania, extinct on mainland), thylacine... and marsupial lions.

Madagascar had the giant fossa. But was that all?

Did Madagascar have any land predator capable of killing an adult aepyornis?

There are other malagasy predators carnivores such as the Malagasy civet (Fossa fossana) and the falanouc (Eupleres goudotii), but both are minor predators, to put it in some way, and belong to the same family as the Fossa: [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eupleridae"]Eupleridae[/ame] family.

So, this latter is the dominant predator of the island.

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Fossa fossana.


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The falanouc.

Both species are endemic of Madagascar.



Did Madagascar have any land predator capable of killing an adult aepyornis? (sic.)

No, there is no species that could something against the bird.
But I'm not sure. I mean, considering the era in which existed the Malagasy giant bird.

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Old March 24th, 2015, 05:44 PM   #149

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Baobad (Adansonia).

Adansonia is a genus of the Bombacaceae family whose members are commonly known as baobab trees.

There are seven species popularly known as Baobab tree in the world, native to Madagascar they can be found in different countries such as Italy and Brazil and have achieved fame travez of which appear in classical literature works.

The Baobab is a gigantic tree of ephemeral flowers and fleshy fruit, of variably form with a hairy shell.
The baobabs are different from any other tree and seem planted in reverse. Beyond curiosities, the Baobabs are the source of many myths and legends, rooted in the memory of Africa.
The Baobab, also called "bottle tree" or "tree pharmacy" belongs to the Bombacaceae family that consists of 150 species, mostly trees and typical of the tropics, with fruits usually very large, such as Durian, Durio zibethinus or Zapote and Matisia cordata.
The Baobab grows in Central Africa and Madagascar and is a native species of the semiarid regions of Sub-Saharan Africa. Sometimes its height exceeds 30 meters, but its trunk can exceed 20 diameter, and can live normally three thousand years, up to a maximum of six. Baobab can store 6,000 to 100,000 liters of water, as the crust is spongy and has many hollow cavities. Since ancient times this tree was used for consumption by the local population and its fruit and leaves were known for their properties.

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Old March 24th, 2015, 07:24 PM   #150

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Grottes d'Anjohibe.



The grotto of the Anjohibe island are located at 90 km. inland, where you can find the nature reserve in Ankarafantsika.

Last edited by Ruiy; March 24th, 2015 at 07:36 PM.
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