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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old January 7th, 2017, 05:18 PM   #1071

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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...iMjrJXMVO5j.97 Archaeologists have found a Stonehenge-like "calendar rock" in Gela, on the southern coast of Sicily, that they say was used as a prehistoric sundial to measure seasons and years during the Bronze Age.
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Featuring a one metre diameter hole, the rock formation marked the beginning of winter some 5,000 years ago
[Credit: Giuseppe La Spina]
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Old January 8th, 2017, 08:59 AM   #1072

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one of the early agricultural instruments was the plow. Click the image to open in full size.
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History of Plows - Plows and Farming - Quatr.us
Quote:
The simplest kind of plow is a digging stick with a handle on it crossways - a scratch plow or ard. You push it along through the dirt, so it makes a groove, and then somebody else goes along behind you dropping the seeds in here and there,
Quote:
In heavier dirt, more like clay, which is common in river valleys like Mesopotamia, it may be impossible to plow without animals.
see also
On the Origin of the Plough, and Wheel-Carriage.
E. B. Tylor
The Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland
Vol. 10 (1881), pp. 74-84
Published by: Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland
DOI: 10.2307/2841649
Stable URL: On the Origin of the Plough, and Wheel-Carriage. on JSTOR
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Old January 9th, 2017, 09:17 AM   #1073

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The Horse in Early China | International Museum of the Horse horse drawn war chariots were in use in China during the Shang Dynasty (circa 1,450 – 1,050 BCE).
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Click the image to open in full size. (note no horse collar)
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Old January 10th, 2017, 12:53 PM   #1074

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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...wLyoU0bbgTf.97
Archaeologists have started an underwater detection project after villagers in eastern China's Jiangxi Province found the head of a Buddha statue emerging from the surface of a local reservoir.
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The head was spotted at Hongmen Reservoir, Nancheng County in the city of Fuzhou, at the end of last year when a hydropower gate renovation project lowered water levels in the reservoir by more than 10 meters.

Judging from the head design, the statue was carved during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), said Xu Changqing, head of the provincial research institute of archaeology.
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Old January 11th, 2017, 07:16 AM   #1075

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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...Mqtsd0LGTQi.97
While mummification and burial in coffins is the form of burial most closely associated with the upper class and nobility in ancient Egypt, new archaeological research has revealed that another common form of burial during these times was in ceramic funerary urns and pots.
a new study published in the Antiquity Magazine reveals that these burials were actually held in high esteem, even by wealthy people. And while “pot burial” had previously been associated with the burial of fetuses, infants and children, they may actually have been more the domain of adults.

Bioarchaeologist Ronika Power and Egyptologist Yann Tristant write that pot burial may have held a symbolic association, as these round burial containers resemble wombs or eggs. Thus, ancient Egyptians may have perceived that such funerary pots and urns facilitated the process of rebirth into the afterlife.

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see also https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...34/core-reader
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Old January 12th, 2017, 04:35 PM   #1076

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Many impressive finds came to light in 2016 on Kythnos, at the site “Vryokastro”, where the ancient capital of the island is located. As the announcement made by the excavation team reports, the investigations focused on two public buildings (sanctuaries) of Classical-Hellenistic times at the Middle Plateau of the Upper City. In fact, one of them (Building 1) was identified with Asklepieion. The excavations are headed by Professor Alexandros Mazarakis Ainian.
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...I4oDTqZL4jC.97
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Old January 13th, 2017, 03:34 PM   #1077

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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...UvZH8ZIJ5J8.97 The Swedish excavation mission from Lund University at Gebel el Silsila in Upper Egypt led by Dr. Maria Nilsson and John Ward, discovered 12 rock cut tombs from the reign of the New Kingdom kings Thutmose III and Amenhotep II.


New tombs discovered at Gebel Al-Silsila area in Aswan
Skeletons found within the tomb [Credit: Ministry of Antiquities]
He continued that they also uncovered three crypts cut into the rock, two niches possibly used for offering, one tomb containing multiple animal burials, and three individual infant burials, along with other associated material.
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Old January 14th, 2017, 06:24 PM   #1078

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https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...TJrbdzirHFD.97
Archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology East working at Hatherdene Close at Cherry Hinton in Cambridge have uncovered a wealth of Anglo-Saxon and Roman finds, as well as shed light on the origins of Cherry Hinton itself.
Anglo-Saxon jewellery, such as fine brooches, multi-coloured glass and amber beads, rings and hairpins, was recovered alongside more utilitarian tools including small knives and iron shield bosses and spear heads.

Some items were recycled, such as a decoration from a shield in the form of a hippogriff (half horse, half eagle), which was re-used as a piece of jewellery, perhaps as a protective symbol or talisman. These items are dated to around the 6th century AD and are associated with a number of burials and a nearby pre-Christian building.

In addition to the metalwork, a number of complete early Anglo-Saxon vessels were found.

Of equal archaeological value, the Roman finds, pre-dating the Anglo-Saxon period, included fine pottery vessels and plates from 2nd-century cremations. The archaeologists also uncovered an early Roman pottery kiln and a complex of late Iron Age and Roman ditches that defined a field system.
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Old January 16th, 2017, 08:22 AM   #1079

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New genetics research led by LAU professor Pierre Zalloua has confirmed the existence of isolated populations around the Black Sea and the Northern Levant during the Ice Age. Referred to as refugia, these populations lived apart from each other with no contact or inter-mixing for more than 25,000 years. "This allowed for distinct genetic signatures specific to each refugium to accumulate," the researcher explains.
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogs...5lGXCj0Q53G.97
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Old January 16th, 2017, 05:14 PM   #1080

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Welcome to Kern, circa 1866: Who you'd be, what you'd see | 150th Anniversary | bakersfield.com
Click the image to open in full size. county seat at the time. Halivah in 1880 (kern museum photo)
If you watched the creation of Kern County in 1866, you were likely a Kern River Valley miner, probably one of 3,000 living in the town of Havilah.

There's a good chance you were from the South -- states like Missouri, Arkansas and Texas -- and first came to California during the Gold Rush seeking your fortune in the central Sierra Nevada.

And you'd probably watched Havilah transform from a settlement with just one store, a few tents and shanties in early 1865 to a boomtown with 147 business buildings lining a one-mile main street by the end of that year.

This first appeared in a Californian special publication, "The story of us," Aug. 6, 2016.
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