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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old April 13th, 2015, 04:18 PM   #41

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Hawaii museum set to unveil artifacts lost in shipwreck 191 years ago | Fox News A Hawaii museum is getting ready to open an exhibit of artifacts from the shipwreck of a royal yacht that sank off the coast of Kauai 191 years ago.

Hawaii shipwreck chaser Richard Rogers has worked with scientists from the Smithsonian Institution to dredge up the treasures from the ship owned by King Kamehameha II, the second king of Hawaii.

"We found gold, silver, Hawaiian poi pounders, gemstones, a boat whistle, knives, forks, mica, things from all over the world, high- and low-end European stuff. Every bit of it is royal treasure," Rogers said.

Rogers volunteered his time aboard his research vessel, the Piliaoha, in four-week intervals from 1995 to 2001 to pull up the artifacts.
The treasures represent the only known objects from the reign of Kamehameha II, the man who abolished the Hawaiian kapu (taboo) socio-cultural system and allowed Christian missionaries into the kingdom.

He only reigned from 1819 -1824.
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Old April 14th, 2015, 07:27 AM   #42

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Strange rituals or cannibalism? Neanderthals manipulated bodies of adults and children shortly after death -- ScienceDaily

Neanderthals from the French region of Poitou-Charentes cut, beat and fractured the bones of their recently deceased companions, as revealed by the fossil remains of two adults and a child found at the Marillac site. These manipulations have been observed at other Neanderthal sites, but scientists still do not know whether they did this for food or ceremony. Scientists have discovered a large quantity of bone remains of these hominids.

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Old April 15th, 2015, 07:34 AM   #43

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Pentagon to exhume remains of 400 Pearl Harbor Marines and sailors | Daily Mail Online The Pentagon said Tuesday it would exhume and try to identify the remains of nearly 400 sailors and Marines killed when the USS Oklahoma sank in the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
The ship capsized after being hit by nine torpedoes during the December 7, 1941 surprise attack from Japanese forces. Altogether, 429 sailors and Marines onboard were killed. Only 35 were identified in the years immediately after.
Hundreds were buried as unknowns at cemeteries in Hawaii. In 1950, they were reburied as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific - also known as the Punchbowl - inside a volcanic crater in Honolulu.
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Old April 15th, 2015, 07:53 AM   #44

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Egypt archaeologists find pharaoh chapel Archaeologists excavating an ancient temple site in Cairo have discovered part of a chapel used by a pharaoh about 2,300 years ago, Egypt's antiquities ministry said on Tuesday.
The chapel was built by King Nectanebo I, a king in the 30th dynasty that ruled from 380 to 340 BC between two Persian invasions of ancient Egypt.
The prayer space inside the larger temple "consists of carved basalt blocks in addition to a part of a royal statue carrying a cartouche of King Merineptah," the ministry statement said.
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Old April 15th, 2015, 08:10 AM   #45

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Smells like Nirvana: Over 500 new artefacts found at Bhamala


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PESHAWAR: More than 500 potentially priceless artefacts have been unearthed at the Unesco World Heritage Site of Bhamala in Haripur as excavation has been put on hold till the beginning of next year. Some of the main discoveries were found to be damaged due to earlier illegal excavation.

The recent discoveries included terracotta artefacts, stucco sculptures, architectural elements, copper coins, iron nails, door sittings, pottery and 14 coins from the Kushan era.


Apart from natural decay, illegal excavations have resulted in widespread damage to some of the most important discoveries at the ancient Buddhist stupa. Some of the chapels on the southernmost side were found empty, while others contained stucco sculptures of varying and unique styles.

At the moment, the site’s history can be traced back to 2,000 years, but some recent discoveries sent to the US for laboratory tests could date the site even further back in history. Excavation work has been halted till next year by officials and documentation to this effect is in process.


Smells like Nirvana: Over 500 new artefacts found at Bhamala - The Express Tribune
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Old April 16th, 2015, 06:33 AM   #46

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Evidence of Pre-Columbus Trade Found in Alaska House Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.

Archaeologists found the artifacts at the "Rising Whale" site at Cape Espenberg. The new discoveries, combined with other finds made over the past 100 years, suggest trade items and ideas were reaching Alaska from East Asian civilizations well before Christopher Columbus arrived in the Caribbean Sea in 1492 archaeologists said.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 06:24 AM   #47

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The Archaeology News Network: Pictish fort found off Aberdeenshire coast Archaeologists have uncovered a "very significant" Pictish fort after scaling a remote sea stack off the coast of Aberdeenshire. The Aberdeen team believe they have found the remains of a house, a fireplace and ramparts.

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Old April 17th, 2015, 06:32 AM   #48

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Palaeolithic remains show cannibalistic habits of human ancestors -- ScienceDaily Analysis of ancient cadavers recovered at a famous archaeological site confirm the existence of a sophisticated culture of butchering and carving human remains, according to a team of scientists. Gough's Cave in Somerset was thought to have given up all its secrets when excavations ended in 1992, yet research on human bones from the site has continued in the decades since.New radiocarbon techniques have revealed remains were deposited over a very short period of time, possibly during a series of seasonal occupations, about 14,700 years ago. We've found undoubting evidence for defleshing, disarticulation, human chewing, crushing of spongy bone, and the cracking of bones to extract marrow."
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Old April 17th, 2015, 12:34 PM   #49
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Archaeologists Take Wrong Turn, Find World?s Oldest Stone Tools | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

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SAN FRANCISCO–Archaeologists working in the Kenyan Rift Valley have discovered the oldest known stone tools in the world. Dated to around 3.3 million years ago, the implements are some 700,000 years older than stone tools from Ethiopia that previously held this distinction. They are so old, in fact, that they predate the earliest fossils representing our genus, Homo, by half a million years. As such they suggest that stone tool manufacture began not with Homo, but with a more primitive member of the human family.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 12:35 PM   #50
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http://www.nature.com/news/neanderthals-wore-eagle-talons-as-jewellery-1.17095

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Neanderthals hunted mammoths, bison and other powerful animals for food — yet their fiercest foes may have been the massive eagles they snared to make jewellery. The talons of white-tailed eagles found at a Neanderthal site in Croatia show cut marks and patterns of wear that suggest the claws were donned as personal ornaments.
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