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Natural Environment How Human History has been impacted by the environment, science, nature, geography, weather, and natural phenomena


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Old December 2nd, 2015, 01:22 PM   #501

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http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1202132519.htm Impression of King Hezekiah's royal seal discovered in excavations in Jerusalem
First seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king ever exposed in situ in a scientific archaeological excavation
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Old December 3rd, 2015, 06:07 PM   #502

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Story of how US soldier saved 200 Jews is finally told | Fox News
Roddie Edmonds is the first US soldier to receive Israel's Righteous Among the Nations honor, 70 years after he risked his life to save 200 Jews. The native of Knoxville, Tenn., was captured in the Battle of the Bulge in late 1944 and held at German POW camp Staleg IXA, according to Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum.

When the Nazis ordered all Jewish-American POWs to step forward on Jan. 27, 1945, Edmonds—the highest-ranking noncommissioned officer at the camp—ordered 1,000 US soldiers to do so, regardless of their religion, per the AP.
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Old December 4th, 2015, 06:17 AM   #503

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The Archaeology News Network: Engraved schist slab may depict palaeolithic campsite A 13,000 year-old engraving uncovered in Spain may depict a hunter-gatherer campsite, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcos Garcia-Diez from University of the Basque Country, Spain, and Manuel Vaquero from Catalan Institute of Human Paleoecology and Social Evolution - IPHES, Spain.
PLOS ONE: Looking at the Camp: Paleolithic Depiction of a Hunter-Gatherer Campsite
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This paper seeks to present an engraved schist slab recently found in the Molí del Salt site (North-eastern Iberia) and dated at the end of the Upper Paleolithic, ca. 13,800 years ago. This slab displays seven semicircular motifs that may be interpreted as the representation of dome-shaped huts. The analysis of individual motifs and the composition, as well as the ethnographic and archeological contextualization, suggests that this engraving is a naturalistic depiction of a hunter-gatherer campsite. Campsites can be considered the first human landscape, the first area of land whose visible features were entirely constructed by humans. Given the social meaning of campsites in hunter-gatherer life-styles, this engraving may be considered one of the first representations of the domestic and social space of a human group.
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Click the image to open in full size. The stone slab, discovered in 2013 at the Moli del Salt site in Spain, may be one of the earliest known depictions of a human campsite [Credit: Manuel Vaquero & Marcos Garcia Diez]
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Old December 4th, 2015, 09:45 AM   #504

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The Second Americans?
The Second Americans? - Archaeology Magazine
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Just when the story of the peopling of the Americas starts to clear up, it becomes a little more complex again.



In June 2015, after nearly two decades of debate, a genetic analysis of Kennewick Man—an ancient American discovered in Washington State in 1996 and dating back roughly 8,500 years—found him to be most closely related to modern Native Americans, despite his cranial features suggesting Polynesian ancestry. The finding bolstered the hypothesis that a single founding population, of East Asian (with some Siberian) ancestry, originally settled the Americas. These people became isolated for a time in Beringia in the northern Pacific, and then began populating the Western Hemisphere a little more than 15,000 years ago.



But not so fast. This summer two separate research groups reported finding faint genetic signals common to indigenous Australians and Melanesians among widely separated populations in the Americas, suggesting a second influx of people. The researchers disagree on the timing of that migration.



The lab of Harvard geneticist David Reich found a genetic connection between isolated tribes in Brazil’s Amazon rain forest and indigenous people of Australia, New Guinea, and the Andaman Islands, in the Bay of Bengal. They attribute the presence of this DNA—roughly 2 percent of Amazonian ancestry—to a second founding population that arrived in the Americas not long after the Asian ancestors of modern Native Americans. “My gut feeling about this is that it goes back to the Pleistocene—I think it’s at least 12,000 years ago that it came to the Americas,” says Pontus Skoglund, a postdoctoral researcher in Reich’s lab, about the second “pulse” of settlers.



The other research group, led by Eske Willerslev at the University of Copenhagen (who also oversaw the project clearing up the Kennewick Man mystery), disagrees. They found that people in the Aleutian Islands of the Bering Sea also show some genetic legacy from the Austro-Melanesians. Because scientists believe the Aleutians were first reached only about 9,000 years ago, they see this theorized second population coming much later than the first arrivals to the Americas—and thus not qualifying as a “founding” population. They believe this smaller, subsequent arrival flowed through the Aleutians before possibly taking a coastal route to South America.
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Old December 5th, 2015, 08:31 AM   #505

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Incredible images reveal US Navy seaplane lost in Pearl Harbor attack | Fox News Archaeologists from NOAA and the University of Hawaii have released incredible images of a U.S. Navy plane sunk during the opening minutes of the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7 1941.

Just minutes before the attack on Pearl Harbor, aircraft from the Japanese Imperial Navy bombed the nearby U.S. Naval Air Station on the east coast of Oahu, NOAA explained in a press release. Some 27 Catalina PBY "flying boats" on the ground or moored on Kāne‛ohe Bay were destroyed in the attack.
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Old December 5th, 2015, 08:59 AM   #506

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Colombia says treasure-laden San Jose galleon found
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"Great news! We have found the San Jose galleon," the president tweeted.
The wreck was discovered near the port city of Cartagena.
It has been described as the holy grail of shipwrecks, as the ship was carrying one of the largest amounts of valuables ever to have been lost at sea.
Mr Santos said the cargo was worth at least $1bn (£662m).
The San Jose was carrying gold, silver, gems and jewellery collected in the South American colonies to be shipped to Spain's king to help finance his war of succession against the British when it was sunk in June 1708.
The vessel was attacked by a British warship just outside Cartagena.
Colombia says treasure-laden San Jose galleon found - BBC News
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Old December 5th, 2015, 09:24 AM   #507

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The Archaeology News Network: Oldest movable metal printing type discovered in North Korea A piece of Koryo-era metal type predating what is believed to be the world's oldest book printed with movable metal type in 1377, has been unearthed in the North Korean border town of Kaesong.

Archaeologists from South and North Korea found what could be movable metal type from the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). There are only two pieces of extant Goryeo-era movable type in both South and North Korea, despite historical records showing that the technology was widely used in Korea in the 13th century. No scientific tests have yet been conducted on the newly discovered piece of type [Credit: Inter-Korean Historian Association]

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Old December 5th, 2015, 09:25 AM   #508

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The "Viste Boy" lived 8200 years ago at Viste, outside Stavanger in southwestern Norway. He died at the young age of 15. Even though the remains are referred to as the Viste Boy, it is not certain that this is a male skeleton. Scientists had thought they were dealing with a male on the basis of older reports, but Viste Boy could well turn out to be Viste girl.
The Archaeology News Network: 8200-year-old 'Viste Boy' sent for DNA analysis
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Old December 5th, 2015, 10:33 AM   #509
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The Archaeology News Network: Oldest movable metal printing type discovered in North Korea A piece of Koryo-era metal type predating what is believed to be the world's oldest book printed with movable metal type in 1377, has been unearthed in the North Korean border town of Kaesong.

Archaeologists from South and North Korea found what could be movable metal type from the Goryeo Dynasty (918-1392). There are only two pieces of extant Goryeo-era movable type in both South and North Korea, despite historical records showing that the technology was widely used in Korea in the 13th century. No scientific tests have yet been conducted on the newly discovered piece of type [Credit: Inter-Korean Historian Association]

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Now that had to be one ugly looking geezer!
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Old December 5th, 2015, 08:23 PM   #510

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Colombia says treasure-laden San Jose galleon found
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Colombia says treasure-laden San Jose galleon found - BBC News
They found my stash. I will be taking that back now.
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