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Old July 28th, 2017, 04:29 AM   #11

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I decide to raise this thread again; it is a persistent issue across the board.
A few posters here are relatively senior in age, and they tend to portray the time of their youths, teenage years, and childhood as better.
Time is a major filter; we often adore classic movies, TV series, and music because the remembered are usually the jewels of minds.
Do people really prefer the time before the Internet? At least, I am not one of them.
This is something that is a real hot button issue for me. I am easily the oldest employee in my office at 55 yo. I often lampoon myself and the 'back in my day' phenomena.

People have to get over themselves. In the good old days things were not better, or even worse. They were simply different. Each generation has its jewels in their cultural crown, and challenges to face.
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Old August 24th, 2017, 10:14 PM   #12

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This is something that is a real hot button issue for me. I am easily the oldest employee in my office at 55 yo. I often lampoon myself and the 'back in my day' phenomena.

People have to get over themselves. In the good old days things were not better, or even worse. They were simply different. Each generation has its jewels in their cultural crown, and challenges to face.
Thankfully, there are mixed blessings here and there.
Some may believe that the craftsmanship in horological repairs have declined; then, many spare parts and tools are more available than previously.
A side issue: since horological repairs are often about precision, will robots be more competent in this area?
Others may talk about losses of other handcrafts and traditional skills; are they that relevant to our lives?
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Old August 25th, 2017, 05:08 AM   #13

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Thankfully, there are mixed blessings here and there.
Some may believe that the craftsmanship in horological repairs have declined; then, many spare parts and tools are more available than previously.
A side issue: since horological repairs are often about precision, will robots be more competent in this area?
Others may talk about losses of other handcrafts and traditional skills; are they that relevant to our lives?
Many of those handcrafts and traditional skills were primary for our survival, Now not so much. I love to see people practicing these skills because they are part of our heritage, and give me a window into how things were.

These skils also came when there was a different dynamic to the world. Dad went out worked brought home the money. Mum stayed at home raising kids looking for any way to make ends meet.

Today mum and dad work. Kids have multiple out of school activities. Life is way to hectic to spend an afternoon preserving strawberries and fletching arrows for deer season
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Old August 25th, 2017, 05:13 AM   #14

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A little ageist don't you think?

I grew up pre-internet (born 1951); had to make do with libraries. If the net existed then I would probably have never gone to school -too addictive.
Me too; even though I was born in 1968, I used card catalogs at the University of Oregon libraries until they got their first opac. I didn't even use a computer until I went to library school. So I grew up with rabbit ears on TVs, even remember the remaider of B&W televisions, rotary phones, payphones, etc. Now things are changing so fast, I am hearkening back to the good 'ole days too.
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Old August 25th, 2017, 05:14 AM   #15

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It's "Rosy Retrospection": You remember the wonderful birthday cake, but forget much of the puking it up later..
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosy_retrospection

"Rosy retrospection refers to the psychological phenomenon of people sometimes judging the past disproportionately more positively than they judge the present. The Romans occasionally referred to this phenomenon with the Latin phrase "memoria praeteritorum bonorum", which translates into English roughly as "the past is always well remembered".[1] Rosy retrospection is very closely related to the concept of nostalgia. The difference between the terms is that rosy retrospection is a cognitive bias, whereas the broader phenomenon of nostalgia is not necessarily based on a biased perspective.
Although rosy retrospection is a cognitive bias, and distorts a person's view of reality to some extent, some people theorize that it may in part serve a useful purpose in increasing self-esteem and a person's overall sense of well-being. For example, Terence Mitchell and Leigh Thompson mention this possibility in a chapter entitled "A Theory of Temporal Adjustments of the Evaluation of Events"[2] in a book of collected research reports from various authors entitled "Advances in Managerial Cognition and Organizational Information Processing".[3]
Simplifications and exaggerations of memories (such as occurs in rosy retrospection) may also make it easier for people's brains to store long-term memories, as removing details may reduce the burden of those memories on the brain and make the brain require fewer neural connections to form and engrain memories. Mnemonics, psychological chunking, and subconscious distortions of memories may in part serve a similar purpose: memory compression by way of simplification. Data compression in computers works on similar principles: compression algorithms tend to either (1) remove unnecessary details from data or (2) reframe the details in a simpler way from which the data can subsequently be reconstructed as needed, or (3) both. Much the same can be said of human memories and the human brain's own process of memorization.
In English, the idiom "rose-colored glasses" or "rose-tinted glasses" is also sometimes used to refer to the phenomenon of rosy retrospection. Usually this idiom occurs as some variation of the phrase "seeing things through rose-tinted glasses" or some other roughly similar phrasing.
Rosy retrospection is also related to the concept of declinism."
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Old August 25th, 2017, 05:32 AM   #16

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This looks interesting. With Daniel Dennett, too:

The evolution of misbelief:
https://ase.tufts.edu/cogstud/dennet...lmisbelief.pdf

Abstract:

From an evolutionary standpoint, a default presumption is that true beliefs are adaptive and misbeliefs maladaptive. But ifhumans are biologically engineered to appraise the world accurately and to form true beliefs, how are we to explain the routineexceptions to this rule? How can we account for mistaken beliefs, bizarre delusions, and instances of self-deception? We explorethis question in some detail. We begin by articulating a distinction between two general types of misbelief: those resulting from abreakdown in the normal functioning of the belief formation system (e.g., delusions) and those arising in the normal course of thatsystem’s operations (e.g., beliefs based on incomplete or inaccurate information). The former are instances of biological dysfunction
or pathology, reflecting “culpable” limitations of evolutionary design. Although the latter category includes undesirable (buttolerable) by-products of “forgivably” limited design, our quarry is a contentious subclass of this category: misbeliefs best conceivedas design features. Such misbeliefs, unlike occasional lucky falsehoods, would have been systematically adaptive in the evolutionarypast. Such misbeliefs, furthermore, would not be reducible to judicious – but doxastically1 noncommittal – action policies. Finally,such misbeliefs would have been adaptive in themselves, constituting more than mere by-products of adaptively biased misbeliefproducingsystems. We explore a range of potential candidates for evolved misbelief, and conclude that, of those surveyed, only positive illusions meet our criteria.

Keywords: adaptive; belief; delusions; design; evolution; misbelief; positive illusions; religion; self-deception
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Old August 25th, 2017, 05:39 AM   #17

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This is kind of timely:

On the bottom of page 521:

"On the adaptive advantage of always being
right (even when one is not)"

Hmmmmmm

https://ase.tufts.edu/cogstud/dennet...lmisbelief.pdf
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Old August 25th, 2017, 06:10 AM   #18

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A related feeling is the Japanese "Mono no aware"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mono_no_aware
I think it is this feeling that one develops as one ages; it's a kind of compassionate empathy born from loss.
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