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Old February 17th, 2017, 08:09 AM   #91
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Could be a national syllabus thing. We also read Of Mice & Men, and To Kill A Mockingbird, and Catcher in the Rye. And these are all the C20th. When were you going through these books at school?
When I was 14 in 1988.

Looking back we were so fortunate to be given the opportunity to read books such as the two mentioned and Lord of the Flies.

Absolutely outstanding books.

And, we also read a lot of WW1 poetry - so pretty much heaven for anyone who likes to read of extreme situations and emotions.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 08:15 AM   #92

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Must be an age thing. I also read Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies. I couldn't stand LotF and loved TKaM.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 08:24 AM   #93
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Must be an age thing. I also read Of Mice and Men, To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies. I couldn't stand LotF and loved TKaM.
Lord of the Flies stands out for me because it was the first time my eyes were opened to the possibility that there are those who are community minded and there are those who are psychopathic, and sometimes groups form behind those two contrasting standpoints; and you can't always count on the community minded to win the battle of ideas.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 11:11 AM   #94

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Lord of the Flies stands out for me because it was the first time my eyes were opened to the possibility that there are those who are community minded and there are those who are psychopathic, and sometimes groups form behind those two contrasting standpoints; and you can't always count on the community minded to win the battle of ideas.
Like English class:

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Old February 17th, 2017, 06:55 PM   #95

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Like English class:

Now, we are into high school English classes!
I recalled Shakespeare as part of the course, and it was Romeo & Juliet in Grade 10, Macbeth in Grade 11, and Hamlet (heck, Hamlet as a word can lead to a few puns: hamlet as a little piece of ham, Hamlet did not live in a hamlet, Hamlet did not eat ham, or more); they took up a good section of English classes.
Let me recall other works:
Crucible and Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller, who was married to Marilyn Monroe before her death.
The Chrysalids by John Wyndham
Some short stories
Greek mythology at Grade 10; unfortunately, I was in Grade 10 way before the wide availability of the Internet, and I could not ask a real Hellenist about Greek mythology.
The Man of La Mancha by Dale Wasserman.
I took a course of British literature and Canadian literature respectively in university, but I lost interest in literary works a few years ago.
The only African English literary work I read was Wole Soyinka's The Interpreters; I just wondered how he won the Nobel prize of literature.
What would you think if Dune (the first book in the series) is used for English classes?
Of Mice and Men, I took it to the literal level and made a thread called "Of rodents and humans".
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Old February 24th, 2017, 10:58 PM   #96
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Completely normal haha.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 11:53 PM   #97

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The only African English literary work I read was Wole Soyinka's The Interpreters; I just wondered how he won the Nobel prize of literature.
Soyinka is a great writer in my view. He is not really a novelist though and he has made a self-deprecating joke in the past about that particular novel of his.

However, I actually found The Interpreters to be very interesting, especially in terms of style, but I wouldn't necessarily put it in the category of the top novels written by African authors, and it's not Soyinka's best work either. In fact, his other novel (Season of Anomy) is better in my opinion (and also much more accessible and easily understood).

I would recommend Ake: The Years of Childhood (a memoir) or Samarkand and Other Markets I Have Known (a poetry collection) or some of his plays to start with if you consider reading his work again.

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Old February 25th, 2017, 12:10 AM   #98

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To my mind, nationality isn't a concrete thing Linguistic Traveller, it's a social construct. It no more defines you as a person than the clothes you wear.

For example, depending on where I am, I can be percieved as Western, European, British, Scots, from the town, or neighbourhood, street, or (this is true), which part of the street - I grew up in the middle section.

I say perceived, as I beleive that is important. It's not me making me Western, or from the middle of a certain street. It's others.

Nationality can often be more about who you are not, from the perspective of others (i.e you are not one of them), rather than who you are. And in that sense, not a great yardstick of someones identity.

I've travelled a bit, and one lesson I've learned is that there are better ways of judging individuals than what nation they were born into. Would I be a different person if I had been born in India? I suspect not. A different perspective? Of course.

I think it can be normal to dislike your nationality. There is a socially constructed stereotype for you to scrutinise and appraise, therefore decide whether you like it or not. I think the mistake you may be making however, is in its importance. Is it that important if you don't like snickers or plaid? Is that how you define yourself? Of course not, or at least I beleive you shouldn't.

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Old February 25th, 2017, 01:10 AM   #99

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To my mind, nationality isn't a concrete thing Linguistic Traveller, it's a social construct. It no more defines you as a person than the clothes you wear.

For example, depending on where I am, I can be percieved as Western, European, British, Scots, from the town, or neighbourhood, street, or (this is true), which part of the street - I grew up in the middle section.

I say perceived, as I beleive that is important. It's not me making me Western, or from the middle of a certain street. It's others.

Nationality can often be more about who you are not, from the perspective of others (i.e you are not one of them), rather than who you are. And in that sense, not a great yardstick of someones identity.

I've travelled a bit, and one lesson I've learned is that there are better ways of judging individuals than what nation they were born into. Would I be a different person if I had been born in India? I suspect not. A different perspective? Of course.

I think it can be normal to dislike your nationality. There is a socially constructed stereotype for you to scrutinise and appraise, therefore decide whether you like it or not. I think the mistake you may be making however, is in its importance. Is it that important if you don't like snickers or plaid? Is that how you define yourself? Of course not, or at least I beleive you shouldn't.
Appreciating and cherishing your life is more important.
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Old February 25th, 2017, 02:24 AM   #100

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To my mind, nationality isn't a concrete thing Linguistic Traveller, it's a social construct. It no more defines you as a person than the clothes you wear.

For example, depending on where I am, I can be percieved as Western, European, British, Scots, from the town, or neighbourhood, street, or (this is true), which part of the street - I grew up in the middle section.

I say perceived, as I beleive that is important. It's not me making me Western, or from the middle of a certain street. It's others.

Nationality can often be more about who you are not, from the perspective of others (i.e you are not one of them), rather than who you are. And in that sense, not a great yardstick of someones identity.

I've travelled a bit, and one lesson I've learned is that there are better ways of judging individuals than what nation they were born into. Would I be a different person if I had been born in India? I suspect not. A different perspective? Of course.

I think it can be normal to dislike your nationality. There is a socially constructed stereotype for you to scrutinise and appraise, therefore decide whether you like it or not. I think the mistake you may be making however, is in its importance. Is it that important if you don't like snickers or plaid? Is that how you define yourself? Of course not, or at least I beleive you shouldn't.
There is the same question on a different website from a few years ago now. Here's one of the replies:

'Avant-Garde: I feel the same way. I hate my nationality. I hate everything. I'm really angry at my family for giving birth to me in this horrible country. In my heart, I feel like a European and because of this I plan to move to Britain or France as soon as I graduate from college.'

I think that may have much of the content of this issue. Though of course there is also: 'the grass is always greener on the other side'.
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