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-   -   The developed world dilemma? (http://historum.com/philosophy-political-science-sociology/124624-developed-world-dilemma.html)

VHS January 1st, 2017 08:11 PM

The developed world dilemma?
 
With my new title and this trend:
Why is it that so many young people in America don't want to live any more?
(English may not be my native language, but I would still like to edit the title:
Why so many young people in America don't want to live anymore?)
http://historum.com/philosophy-polit...-any-more.html
How has the developed world become the way it is?
What is the future for the millennials?
What are necessary to break our current models?
The questions can be endless for the current situation of the developed world.

dreuxeng January 4th, 2017 03:44 PM

There is an ambivalence to life:

Throwing ourselves into life at least to some extent, engaging, living the life, this is the thing, being part of it. Having done so however, we can find we haven't lived such fulfilling lives after all, and only find out as much towards the end of our lives!

Ichon January 4th, 2017 05:57 PM

Suicide rates are still quite low though any rise is troublesome there doesn't seem a generational loss of hope among millenials just yet. I think it will hit in a few more years when most clearly see they are likely to achieve less than their parents.

StoryMan January 5th, 2017 04:21 PM

It's not the young people, it is the 35 to 64 year age group that has experienced an unusual increase in the suicide rate in the past 5 years.

The most common opinion among medical providers is decreased financial stability, i.e. unemployment, underemployment, lack of, or loss of savings, loss of pensions, and poorly performing 401k plans, etc. etc. Couple that with the Wall Street collapse, the housing crisis, banking crisis, it adds up to a lot of family financial ruin, a loss of hope, loss of self esteem, and dpression for many.

Another problem is the unavailability of the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) of 30 years ago and the decline in electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), both of which worked wonders for suicidal depression. Today, one would be hard pressed to find a doctor that would prescribe either of those treatments.

What we're left with are the heavily advertised SSRIs like Prozac that sometimes work well for mild depression, but not much else, but also has the occasional side effect of suicidal ideations.

aggienation January 5th, 2017 06:33 PM

"Hard times produce strong men, strong men bring good times, good times produce weak men, weak men bring hard times."

Doesn't matter if you like this, its the natural cycle.

dagul January 5th, 2017 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aggienation (Post 2675990)
"Hard times produce strong men, strong men bring good times, good times produce weak men, weak men bring hard times."

Doesn't matter if you like this, its the natural cycle.

... agreed.

dreuxeng January 6th, 2017 09:50 AM

Whilst the idea of 'the strong man' is a reasonable one, a caveat: the 'good strong man'. See Aristotle.

'The strong man is strongest when alone.' (Schiller).

'...in every age [liberty's] progress has been beset by its natural enemies: ignorance and superstition, and by lust of conquest, love of ease, and by the strong man's craving for power...' (Acton). Napoleon for example and a host of other strong men leaders from world history.

But also: 'Cometh the hour, cometh the man.'

'They were of their time.'

Redaxe January 7th, 2017 03:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StoryMan (Post 2675917)
Another problem is the unavailability of the monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI) of 30 years ago and the decline in electro-convulsive therapy (ECT), both of which worked wonders for suicidal depression. Today, one would be hard pressed to find a doctor that would prescribe either of those treatments.

I would add to this the war against nicotine which has been unfairly maligned as the most addictive and dangerous drug available.

Nicotine is a fantastic antidepressant and can help with neurological disorders. It also reduces appetite so would help with the obesity problem.
Many college students might be interested to hear but some experts even say it is the most reliable cognitive enhancer known to science - even beating provigil

https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...arter-excerpt/

When you take nicotine out of cigarettes many scientists are now saying it is no worse than caffeine - it seems that the addicctiveness of cigarrettes is amped up by the chemicals in the smoke. Vaping is probably one of the biggest health breakthroughs in this generation

Asherman January 7th, 2017 04:30 AM

Obviously, your query is larger and more fundamental than that. It is far from clear that Americans, or youth, “no longer want to live”. So to begin with, expand your question to be more inclusive.

Try this:

“Have suicide rates around the world been increasing, and why?”

Suicide is a tricky sort of human behavior, and the reasons why anyone chooses that out-come to life are complex and varied. A few obvious variables are: Terminally ill, and in extreme pain; Self-Death as atonement for some real or perceived failure; Conviction that the future has nothing to offer beyond suffering; Loss of purpose in life; Belief that the world will be better for one’s departure, fashion and Ennui. Understanding and objective measurements for suicide are really more within the field of Psychology than in History. As historians we are interested more in how/why humans react to challenges by studying events, trends and change. Like everything else, suicide trends vary from time to time. I doubt there are good statistics on the matter, and if so they are most likely found in the Psychology literature.

Once we’ve identified what the trends are, we can begin to question the range of possible causes (proximate and further afield) that may be driving the trends.

Personally, I think that humans in the early 21st century psychologically challenged by rapid and radical changes unique in our history. Old ways and beliefs of even a few years ago are gone, and are missed even by those who have never known anything different. We are herd animals for millions of years, and now find ourselves alone, and with little control over even our little bubble of a world. We have substituted PC for discredited values and as a result most folks have lost their moral compass. This emerging world is far beyond the 18th century notions of Utopia, but there have been numerous un-intended consequences that are disturbing. Have the numbers of those who are ill at ease in this world we’ve been creating for the past two or three hundred years increased? Where is the proofs?

We get a feeling that one of the consequences of this product we bought into in an attempt to eliminate suffering was fundamentally flawed, and that materialism is much more destructive than previously believed. Or not? Is that a cause for suicide? Perhaps, but it remains speculative.

A Vietnamese January 7th, 2017 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dagul (Post 2676034)
... agreed.

I wish to be born and raised as a Swedish so that I can live such a comfortable live to the point of losing touch with reality and join ISIS to fight for Allah.


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