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Old September 1st, 2017, 05:08 PM   #11

Josefa's Avatar
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Joined: Jul 2017
From: Germany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willempie View Post
There are more reasons, but I am now arriving at the office....
I'd love if, whenever you find the time, ou could say more about it, Willempie! I'm truely wondering what's wrong with me at the moment .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willempie View Post
Firstly using we directly signals an opinion or sentiment.
That actually may have something to do with why it annoys me so much: when talking about historical events I'm not interested in opinions or sentiments, at least not in the beginning. I want to know what happened and by what sources we came to that knowledge, i.e., how secure that knowledge is. Any evaluations or conclusions, parallels in the present and so on come later. A lot later.
Maybe it's because everybody else is much more knowledgeable than me about history in general. They simply skip a step that I cannot take.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willempie View Post
Secondly the mumbo jumbo about having more in common with blabla than with dutchies centuries ago is unsubstantiated BS. I had more in common with my great grandmother from the 19th century, then I have with my colleague from Belgium.
I thought about that. My great-grandmother lived at the end of the 19th century, too. She came from a village not 20 kms from the one I grew up in and the small country town I live in now. She was the daughter of an allegedly rather wealthy farmer and got pregnant by the son of a business owner who would not marry her. So she and her little bastard son that was to be my grandfather were married off to another farmer, who, by all accounts, treated her (and the rest of the world) like sh*t. She gave birth to a couple more children and died after some years while my grandfather was still a child. (Her husband would use up two more wifes before his own death.)
As much as I can imagine, this woman's life consisted of pregnancies, plucking geese and trying to satisfy a tyrannical husband - nothing of which plays a role in my life. I doubt she ever made a journey farther than the one that took her from her father's to her husband's home. Did she own books? Doubtful. Was she ever allowed to learn? Maybe read the bible. Even if she had read novels I would never have heard of them. If she ever wrote anything, like letters, which is highly improbable in the first place, I could not read it because I do not read Sütterlin. She lived in a monarchy and probably prayed for the health of the Prince Regent every Sunday during a mass which was held in the same church building that I go to, but in a different language and with a different liturgy.
If she and I ever met, would we find a single thing we could talk about? That is assuming we could easily chat with each other at all - I find 19th century dialect rather difficult to understand.

So, yes, I actually think that I have more in common with my male colleague from Afghanistan with whom I can chat about our customers, the parking situation in front of our building and local football clubs, than with my own great-grandmother.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willempie View Post
Thirdly I see the we around me every day. "We" are a country for over four centuries, with a single language, culture, history etc. So using "we" is very logical to me.
Well, this is obviously different where I come from.

Sorry for boring you with that lengthy drivel. But you really gave me food for thought with that remark.

Last edited by Josefa; September 1st, 2017 at 05:42 PM.
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