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Old December 15th, 2017, 11:17 PM   #1

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Panopticon , the future !


.
toward the end of the 18th century , Britain was gripen with an essential waste problem
.....criminals , what to do with them
the old system was simple .....stockade and whipping or hanging
then there was a rise in the "in between" criminals ( mostly Irish ) not criminal enough to be hanged but too reprobate to be let go ,
Irish were found to be mostly immune to flogging and are Catholic to boot
transportation plugged the gap somewhat but with the rising affluence of Victoria Britain incarceration was seen as a viable option
this was the infancy of prisons
Jeremy Bentham developed the theory of the Panopticon , a circular building where one warden , centrally located could watch all the prisoners in their cells without them knowing if they were actually being watched

they had to behave on the assumption that their were under surveillance ,
even if in fact there was nobody in the central hub

this was a radical concept , constant control at a minimum cost

This is now being implemented for the digital age , it is impossible to know if one is in fact being monitored
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Old December 16th, 2017, 12:00 PM   #2
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Old December 16th, 2017, 12:08 PM   #3
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Pokes out the one eye of Odinn and leases Lucifer blind
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Old December 16th, 2017, 04:17 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky View Post
.
toward the end of the 18th century , Britain was gripen with an essential waste problem
.....criminals , what to do with them
the old system was simple .....stockade and whipping or hanging
then there was a rise in the "in between" criminals ( mostly Irish ) not criminal enough to be hanged but too reprobate to be let go ,
Irish were found to be mostly immune to flogging and are Catholic to boot
transportation plugged the gap somewhat but with the rising affluence of Victoria Britain incarceration was seen as a viable option
this was the infancy of prisons
Jeremy Bentham developed the theory of the Panopticon , a circular building where one warden , centrally located could watch all the prisoners in their cells without them knowing if they were actually being watched

they had to behave on the assumption that their were under surveillance ,
even if in fact there was nobody in the central hub

this was a radical concept , constant control at a minimum cost

This is now being implemented for the digital age , it is impossible to know if one is in fact being monitored
Well what makes you think that modern prisons are not Panopticons? I mean apart from the design of being a circle, which some prisons kind of are?
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Old December 16th, 2017, 07:47 PM   #5

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Truly close circuit cameras are now ubiquitous in the carceral industry
it is even expanded to digital monitoring of people convicted to home detention
and of night life areas once prone to misbehavior
some form of "the cops are watching you , maybe but they sure have the footage "

As for the convicted of lesser offense not justifying the expense of detention , they are tracked and restricted to an area ,some form of stockade rather than Jail
it would be possible to add electric shocks to replace the whipping

progress never cease to amaze me in it's recycling of old ideas
the desire of the State to acquire knowledge on its denizen is a thirst impossible to slake
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Old December 28th, 2017, 01:28 AM   #6
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If someone want to see it in a more optimistic light from the point of view of the "ordinary people", then we may look at such tools as potentially not only for the ruling watching the people, but potentially at least also the other way round. Why canīt "people" watch governments from, say, satellites, drones or via some of all the other tools available? Such tools may still be usefull from outside national territories, making it more difficult for governments to oppress.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 02:06 AM   #7

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Yes indeed , the catch is however than it take a certain amount of experience and cold headedness to shift through the mountain of information without subconsciously reinforcing one's prejudgement

Still there is a massive amount which can be gleaned on public sources

the obverse is that government agency have the manpower , budget and legal authority to monitor everyone who has any activity in society , from social security , driving licence ,medical info , bank record and transaction ...etc
if , as is the most common case , one possess a mobile phone , the tracking can be done in real time
there are algorithms which establish a connection between one individual and all the other by "distance" either geographic , by contact or by interest

it is in fact an exercise in the futile pursuit of information power ,those government organizations are as obsessed with their own prejudgments as any individual and drown in a sea of irrelevance

The first law of the intelligence business is not to find the facts but to present to the rulers the facts they want to hear
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Old December 28th, 2017, 03:37 AM   #8
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In fact Panopticons were still used in prisons such as Stateville in the United States until as recently as last year. The idea was that one guard could watch all areas of the Panopticon at once, and you can see examples of central control in central guard tower at Stateville where you can find many gun holes in the roofing surrounding it. It's worth looking up if you are interested in such things.

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Last edited by orestes; December 28th, 2017 at 03:40 AM.
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Old December 28th, 2017, 01:11 PM   #9

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Thanks Orestes , nice picture
as East Germany demonstrated , enforcing "laws" create a big economic problem , they went bankrupt by over surveillance at some stage one third of the population was indexed as informant

a total enforcement require a massive amount of investment in people and resources
there is then only two practical solution
make some of the inmates or Slaves /prisoner become guards
or make only such laws which are willingly followed (mostly)
this last one imply an understanding of human nature rather than a ideological belief in what human should be
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Old December 29th, 2017, 07:41 AM   #10

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The trend is toward an end to privacy, not just for criminals, but for everyone. Video cameras are so common as to be unremarkable. Most businesses have video recordings of employees, customers, and looky-loos. Traffic cameras monitor street corners, but their fields of vision take in your neighbor walking the dog, the loiterer and criminals alike. Along the highways, cameras can read and follow a particular license plate for miles. Your computer can be hacked, but we also "allow/permit" a wide range of businesses to monitor every key-stroke. Our cars build up a history of each time we visit a store, and the store has a record of everything you buy. My financial institution knows more about my spending habits than I do. Institutions and business communicate with one another, all for "good" purposes; to make our lives easier, cheaper, and better for satisfying our cravings before we know we have a craving. Government need information to design and implement programs, and they may have the biggest data banks of all.

Now there are gadgets that never sleep, but record everything that happens in whatever room they happen to be placed in. Some, I'm told have cameras to watch over us and record our movements. My great-grandparents would be shocked that some today freely have surveillance cameras focused on their beds. Teenagers reveal themselves to strangers, and PC is king.

This isn't some nefarious plan by an evil genius, nor a conspiracy by some ancient secret society. We have willingly given up our privacy, and oft times pay to be rid of it. You get what you desire ... ain't it great?
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