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Old December 30th, 2017, 08:55 AM   #1

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Are Protests the Most Effective Method to Bring About Change in Society?


Are Protests the Most Effective Method to Bring About Change in Society?

Here are articles from differing perspectives on this topic:

(A) https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...-to-protesting
(B) https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...t-work/360264/
(C) https://www.economist.com/blogs/demo...treet-protests
(D) https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...he-difference/
(E) https://hbr.org/2017/01/how-protests...cial-movements

So, do you think that formal protests in the streets, ect. are the most effective way (or effective in any way) of brining about change in society? Or, rather, would it be more efficient to end "PC" behavior and have "everyday conversations" about the issues with people that you come into social contact with, post more blogs, other writing/video formats posted online or in person, lectures/talks, ect.? Is it more that people are not challenged on their beliefs in everyday life and that doing this would be the best way to bring about change in society rather than isolated protests in streets that (although large ones receive media coverage) is more or less "preaching to the quire" or otherwise overly confrontational? Also, are street protests designed to be fundamentally emotional, illogical, and rather irrational with chanting's and mantras recited en masse? Is this a proper mechanism for which to persuade others that do not see nor agree with your perspective? Also, doesn't the risk of street protest (i.e. going to jail) seem far higher than "everyday conversation" even if those conversations may be highly uncomfortable?

Thoughts?
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Old December 31st, 2017, 03:21 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xMathFanx View Post
Are Protests the Most Effective Method to Bring About Change in Society?

Here are articles from differing perspectives on this topic:

(A) https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...-to-protesting
(B) https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...t-work/360264/
(C) https://www.economist.com/blogs/demo...treet-protests
(D) https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...he-difference/
(E) https://hbr.org/2017/01/how-protests...cial-movements

So, do you think that formal protests in the streets, ect. are the most effective way (or effective in any way) of brining about change in society? Or, rather, would it be more efficient to end "PC" behavior and have "everyday conversations" about the issues with people that you come into social contact with, post more blogs, other writing/video formats posted online or in person, lectures/talks, ect.? Is it more that people are not challenged on their beliefs in everyday life and that doing this would be the best way to bring about change in society rather than isolated protests in streets that (although large ones receive media coverage) is more or less "preaching to the quire" or otherwise overly confrontational? Also, are street protests designed to be fundamentally emotional, illogical, and rather irrational with chanting's and mantras recited en masse? Is this a proper mechanism for which to persuade others that do not see nor agree with your perspective? Also, doesn't the risk of street protest (i.e. going to jail) seem far higher than "everyday conversation" even if those conversations may be highly uncomfortable?

Thoughts?
I think it depends entirely upon issue, what society one lives in and what time, so there is no answer covering all.
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Old December 31st, 2017, 03:56 AM   #3

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xMathFanx View Post
Are Protests the Most Effective Method to Bring About Change in Society?

Here are articles from differing perspectives on this topic:

(A) https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...-to-protesting
(B) https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...t-work/360264/
(C) https://www.economist.com/blogs/demo...treet-protests
(D) https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...he-difference/
(E) https://hbr.org/2017/01/how-protests...cial-movements

So, do you think that formal protests in the streets, ect. are the most effective way (or effective in any way) of brining about change in society? Or, rather, would it be more efficient to end "PC" behavior and have "everyday conversations" about the issues with people that you come into social contact with, post more blogs, other writing/video formats posted online or in person, lectures/talks, ect.? Is it more that people are not challenged on their beliefs in everyday life and that doing this would be the best way to bring about change in society rather than isolated protests in streets that (although large ones receive media coverage) is more or less "preaching to the quire" or otherwise overly confrontational? Also, are street protests designed to be fundamentally emotional, illogical, and rather irrational with chanting's and mantras recited en masse? Is this a proper mechanism for which to persuade others that do not see nor agree with your perspective? Also, doesn't the risk of street protest (i.e. going to jail) seem far higher than "everyday conversation" even if those conversations may be highly uncomfortable?

Thoughts?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fantasus View Post
I think it depends entirely upon issue, what society one lives in and what time, so there is no answer covering all.
I agree with Fantasus the context and nature of the protest can determine whether protests are effective. In general, most people don't like to be beat over the head by in your face confrontations, especially continually. At least I don't. Often protests are over hyper emotional issues which raises the tensions even more. Protests to educate have their value. At some point, most continual, repetitive protests have a diminished return and lose their value - at least for me.
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Old December 31st, 2017, 11:12 AM   #4
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Protests can backfire. People involved in protests need to think about what they want to accomplish. Is it to change minds or simply to preach to the converted? Nixon's election (1968) was due in large part to protests by those those who protested in Chicago at the Democratic National Convention and later against Nixon in the general election.

In the US anyway, the best thing one can do is support candidates they favor or run for office themselves.

Last edited by stevev; December 31st, 2017 at 11:17 AM.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 04:12 AM   #5
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Joined: Aug 2014
From: Portugal
Posts: 1,118

Quote:
Originally Posted by xMathFanx View Post
Are Protests the Most Effective Method to Bring About Change in Society?

Here are articles from differing perspectives on this topic:

(A) https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...-to-protesting
(B) https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...t-work/360264/
(C) https://www.economist.com/blogs/demo...treet-protests
(D) https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...he-difference/
(E) https://hbr.org/2017/01/how-protests...cial-movements

So, do you think that formal protests in the streets, ect. are the most effective way (or effective in any way) of brining about change in society? Or, rather, would it be more efficient to end "PC" behavior and have "everyday conversations" about the issues with people that you come into social contact with, post more blogs, other writing/video formats posted online or in person, lectures/talks, ect.? Is it more that people are not challenged on their beliefs in everyday life and that doing this would be the best way to bring about change in society rather than isolated protests in streets that (although large ones receive media coverage) is more or less "preaching to the quire" or otherwise overly confrontational? Also, are street protests designed to be fundamentally emotional, illogical, and rather irrational with chanting's and mantras recited en masse? Is this a proper mechanism for which to persuade others that do not see nor agree with your perspective? Also, doesn't the risk of street protest (i.e. going to jail) seem far higher than "everyday conversation" even if those conversations may be highly uncomfortable?

Thoughts?
Protests alone maybe not enough. It is a means to make something public, to educate people who are not participating, to pressure some hierarchy being it the government or the boss.

But it works better if combined with other tactics like boycott, information campaigns, forming organised groups, pressuring politicians or the bosses, etc.

Protests can be easily infiltrated and dismantled by the police or manipulated by the Media. So at home all we see is violence or people with exotic hairstyles but in the end we don't understand why they are protesting.
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