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Old June 30th, 2012, 10:20 AM   #31

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My mum still calls me a bugger, yet if i swaer i am in for it.

So if my mum users it, it can't be swearing
It's not a word my wife will use, so we will have to agree to differ on this point
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Old June 30th, 2012, 10:23 AM   #32
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It's not a word my wife will use, so we will have to agree to differ on this point
Not the first time
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Old June 30th, 2012, 10:44 AM   #33

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C*nt; I remember looking it up in the OED when very young (as you do...) and finding it defined as "a ball of wool or fur". Funny the things you remember eh.

I remember somebody claiming recently (annoyingly I forget where) that in medieval times it was generally an insult aimed at powerful women. Can't speak for the veracity of that though.

Also interesting though, are the origins of insults that I really did see as very tame, namely calling someone a Charlie or a Berk.

These words come from rhyming slang and mean "Charlie Hunt" and "Berkeley Hunt" respectively.

It's interesting how the usage and context can effect your response to pretty much any word.
Calling someone a "silly bugger" can be very tame or even affectionate. When I was nursing though we had one guy who used to scream "Bugger!!" repeatedly at the top of his voice, and I've never felt quite the same way about the word since.
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Old November 27th, 2012, 03:11 PM   #34

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why do you think some languages (cultures) are more "creative" in cussing? too much free time? higher stress levels?
turkish and arabic seem exclusively creative about this (compared to english and danish. oh poor danish, half of the bad words arent even danish ). whenever i go to turkey i learn a newly created very fresh cuss word

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Old November 27th, 2012, 04:26 PM   #35

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When our ancestors, especially the Anglo-Saxon ones, faced off against each other in dispute, THAT word, the one that begins with F--was synonymous with to strike--Ficken. When men get angry with each other the bad words come out, that they are sexual in nature is a signal that the discussion/argument has reached a level where the next step is violence. The words are a natural warning. Modern society has devalued this age-old mechanism so that the words no longer have the power they once had.
There is another problem. The men around Margaret Thatcher had a problem when arguing with her. When a point was reached where male confrontationists would start effing and blinding to forcefully make a point, those cultured folks would just go red and concede or walk out. Women have never understood what men learned in the playground aged about six, that one step futher and I punch your lights out.
Sadly, those days have gone and women, even in elevated positions, now swear like deckhands on a sewage boat.
Stupid really. When people swear all of the time, they have nothing left for special occasions.
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Old November 27th, 2012, 10:45 PM   #36
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I am sure there are curses which do not involve sexuality at all like in Spanish "que te chanque un tren" (it is only used by children and often in a long line of innocent playful words, but it may have originated as a curse as it translate as "may it be that a train runs over you")
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Old November 28th, 2012, 03:30 AM   #37

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Not exactly cussing, but I read some time ago an interesting comment about how some English slang, such as Dutch courage, and French leave, tend to reflect our changing relationships to the rest of Europe.

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I am sure there are curses which do not involve sexuality at all like in Spanish "que te chanque un tren" (it is only used by children and often in a long line of innocent playful words, but it may have originated as a curse as it translate as "may it be that a train runs over you")
'Damn' and 'Damn you' have no sexual connotations of course, and have pretty much passed out of fashion now although in past decades they wouldn't have been acceptable in novels or on screen.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 03:54 AM   #38

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Perhaps my brother was the one who lost something in translation when he found out what bugger meant.
Perhaps it was not the severity of the swear word , but the actual fact of swearing in front of a baby or a child , which i hope is still frowned upon these days.

How on earth did you get yourself suspended Virgil , you have always seemed to me to be a very amiable character ??...where is the icon for surprised?
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Old November 28th, 2012, 04:03 AM   #39
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Not exactly cussing, but I read some time ago an interesting comment about how some English slang, such as Dutch courage, and French leave, tend to reflect our changing relationships to the rest of Europe.

'Damn' and 'Damn you' have no sexual connotations of course, and have pretty much passed out of fashion now although in past decades they wouldn't have been acceptable in novels or on screen.
True, that are simple cussing words that originate on christianity
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Old November 28th, 2012, 04:17 AM   #40

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It's probably because I don't use Japanese in everyday life, but the only "curse" word I know in Japanese is "chikushou", which can be roughly translated as "Jesus Christ".

There are plenty of ways to be rude or insult someone in Japanese, but most of these involve the form of address or pronoun that you use to refer to someone. Of course, there's the usual way to insult someone by calling them a dog or some other descriptive turn. I imagine gangsters have their own set of colourful language, but I don't speak yakuza very well.
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