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Old November 12th, 2012, 10:06 PM   #11

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I figure that's going to come down to parents. I think the real risk lies in mistakes; altering a gene expecting A to happen and getting B instead.
Also the fact that if we can find the genes for very high intelligence everyone will be selecting for that. Then as the first generation of selected babies comes along there will be a huge group of incredibly intelligent kids in households with dumb adults and many dumb peers.

A few years down the line we will have some hyper intelligent, socially damaged and possibly permanently scarred teenagers.

Still, growing pains go along with any new phase of development.

I'm for it.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 10:07 PM   #12

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I figure that's going to come down to parents. I think the real risk lies in mistakes; altering a gene expecting A to happen and getting B instead.
That's another subset of dangers. Genetics is a young science, epigenetics even younger.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 10:13 PM   #13

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A provocative hypothesis published in a recent set of Science and Society pieces published in the Cell Press journal Trends in Genetics suggests that we are losing our intellectual and emotional capabilities because the intricate web of genes endowing us with our brain power is particularly susceptible to mutations and that these mutations are not being selected against in our modern society.
I did the "genius" thread a few weeks ago. From what I've read on the subject, it seems pretty clear that high-IQ people are more susceptible than average to mental illness. It could be that if people do lose something in IQ they may regain it in stability.
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Old November 12th, 2012, 10:26 PM   #14

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But the Flynn effect would seem to contradict this hypothesis:

Flynn_effect Flynn_effect
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Old November 13th, 2012, 04:10 PM   #15

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But the Flynn effect would seem to contradict this hypothesis:

Flynn effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This could be a case of people coming across such questions more often in modern life. Or, maybe we are getting better. Still, if the option of improving based on genetic manipulation is there, I think we should take advantage of it.
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