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View Poll Results: Would be morally acceptable to give such potion?
Yes 6 21.43%
No 22 78.57%
Voters: 28. You may not vote on this poll

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Old November 18th, 2012, 12:37 PM   #21

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Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
Assuming someone is in love with another person with no success, assuming he manages to give to the person he loves a love potion that makes this person fall in love too, and assuming that they both end up being happy with their relationship, would be ethical or not to give such potion?

Important thing to remind: they are, and will be, really happy with their relationship

This may seem a joke thread, but I have more deep questions related to this situation

Edit: another important thing to remember: the person that gets conquered with the potion doesn't have previous relationship and thus her falling in love with the potion-giver won't hurt anybody


You may wish to consider that if the said potion should fall into the hands of a delinquent pervert (heaven forbid) then I... er, I mean "he" might use said potion for acts of ill repute and offer a sip to Alizee Jacotey or Emma Watson, or perhaps both at the same time?

Next thing ya know they're having really pervy sex with no thoughts for luvy-wuvy mush and romance. Would this be unethical? Bearing in mind that the lucky lad is probably having a cracking time and all that.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 01:44 PM   #22

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl_of_Rochester View Post
You may wish to consider that if the said potion should fall into the hands of a delinquent pervert (heaven forbid) then I... er, I mean "he" might use said potion for acts of ill repute and offer a sip to Alizee Jacotey or Emma Watson, or perhaps both at the same time?

Next thing ya know they're having really pervy sex with no thoughts for luvy-wuvy mush and romance. Would this be unethical? Bearing in mind that the lucky lad is probably having a cracking time and all that.
That is obviously perfectly ethical
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Old November 18th, 2012, 06:07 PM   #23

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The Chinese have something called gu poison, which can be used to kill people or it can be altered to do differnt things. Seduction is one of them. This really does exist and work.

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Seduce
This gu meaning 2.7 of "seduce; bewitch; attract; confuse; mislead; bewilder" is evident in the Standard Chinese words yaogu 妖蠱 "bewitch by seductive charms", gumei 蠱媚 "bewitch/charm by sensual appeal", and guhuo 蠱惑 "confuse by magic; enchant; seduce into wrongdoing". "Ku-poisoning was also associated with demoniac sexual appetite an idea traceable back to Chou times", says Schafer (1967:103), "This notion evidently had its origins in stories of ambiguous love potions prepared by the aboriginal women of the south.
The Zuozhuan (莊公28, tr. Legge 1872:115) uses gu in a story that in the 7th century BCE, Ziyuan 子元, the chief minister of Chu, "wished to seduce the widow" of his brother King Wen of Zhou. The Mozi (非儒下, tr. Mei 1929:208) uses gu to criticize Confucius, who "dresses elaborately and puts on adornments to mislead the people." The Erya (1B/49, cf. 2.5 above) defines gu 蠱, chan 諂 "doubt; flatter", and er 貳 "double-hearted; doubtful" as yi 疑 "doubt; suspect; fear; hesitate". Guo Pu's commentary suggests this refers to gu meaning "deceive; seduce".
Many later accounts specify women as gu-magic practitioners. Eberhard (1968:149) explains,
We know that among many aborigines of the south women know how to prepare love charms which were effective even at a distance. In these reports it was almost invariably stated that the love charm had a fatal effect if the man, to whom the charm was directed, did not return to the woman at a specified time.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gu_(poison)


Personally, I see it as very unethical, because you're forcing a person to love you. It's almost like rape, where you force a person to have sex. In the end, someone who does this would have to face the mirror every morning and see something he/she would not like.


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Old November 18th, 2012, 06:10 PM   #24

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Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
What about a situation where we know that the lady is, and will always be, unhappy of her life? would giving her the potion, that would make her happy, be acceptable?
Nobody can look into the future. One day she may become happy. If the lady is unhappy, putting her in a false realtionship is not the answer. If she finds out, it could make her feel worse.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 10:53 PM   #25

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No because It deprives that other person from their right to make a choice. That is the only reason I can see that it would be unethical in this situation...
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Old November 19th, 2012, 07:48 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake10 View Post
Nobody can look into the future. One day she may become happy. If the lady is unhappy, putting her in a false realtionship is not the answer. If she finds out, it could make her feel worse.
It's an ethical question that can lead to other interesting consequences.

Assuming she will always be happy, would it be unethical to give her the potion?
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Old November 19th, 2012, 08:01 AM   #27

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Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
It's an ethical question that can lead to other interesting consequences.

Assuming she will always be happy, would it be unethical to give her the potion?
No one has the right to control another human being. Whether she would be happy or unhappy is absolutely irrelevant. Plus, there is no way of saying whether she would be happy or not, it is impossible to say how any relationship will work out.

Natural love is deluding enough as it is without an extra fake element being added to the equation.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 12:07 PM   #28

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Love is the human tool of natural selection in the field of reproduction.

A love potion [once effective, of course] would cross over this mechanism allowing the formation of not "natural" couples.

This is the main trouble in thinking that a love potion is "morally" acceptable. Actually the conception of "morally" is quite weak, when not empty. Sure not general. Different cultures mean different "morals", we know that.

So, I would put it on the layer of psychology. Ok, the couple will be happy, but the children? A not naturally selected couple could generate problems to the children. First of all the lack of natural selection [the woman makes the choice, not a potion] can allow that an unsuitable individual can date a superb exemplar of the other gender [and this is against genetic mechanisms of reproduction of the species, not against moral].

Then, when the children growing will realize, by comparison, that their parents have made an impossible couple ... which will be the effect on their psychology?
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Old November 19th, 2012, 02:44 PM   #29

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
It's an ethical question that can lead to other interesting consequences.

Assuming she will always be happy, would it be unethical to give her the potion?
Maybe she would be happy, but it would be a happiness based on a lie. I can't see how this would be ethical.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 03:34 PM   #30

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Besides the fact that taking the choice away from the person and simply drugging them into a state of "love and happiness" is unethical and immoral, there are a few other things to consider.

The one who administers the drug will know that everything is based on a lie. How does that make them feel after the initial “love and happiness” wears of and s/he is stuck with the realization that there is really no genuine relationship as it is only drug induced. Knowing that they would not be wanted, loved, or even tolerated does not seem to be too good of a feeling.

Then there is the problem with the happiness part. How can someone even know they are happy when they have nothing to contrast it with? How would I know something is sweet if all I ever got was sugar? Same thing, how would I know I love someone and am happy with them if I never experienced anything different?

So let’s say there is a disagreement. Would the drugged one have any way to even resolve that conflict internally and/or externally? I mean if I know that X is the right thing to do, but the person I apparently love and who makes me happy insists on Y, what can I do?

Am I going to be happy giving in, or will I be happy saying no, you’re wrong? That can lead to some serious cognitive dissonance.
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