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Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology Forum - Perennial Ideas and Debates that cross societal/time boundaries


View Poll Results: Would be morally acceptable to give such potion?
Yes 6 20.69%
No 23 79.31%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old November 22nd, 2012, 02:46 PM   #41

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Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
Good in theory, but that's not always applicable. What if your mother is old and simply won't understand? Would in that case removing a beneficial effect worth it?
Well, my mother is free to do as she likes. While I will not lie about the medicine, I will also not forbid her to take it.

At the same time, we need to keep in mind the extent to which this can go. Making people believe something that is not real can grow and develop into a cult. We've all heard the story of 'How the Volcano Became a God'. There was an eruption, people who didn't understand it were awed, and some thought it was a god. One man in the community realized that he could control them through this, and claimed that the volcano god talked to him in his sleep. He told the people his philosophies, which they agreed with, and then they built a temple where he would advise them, live and they would worship. This is an extreme example, but it does show the dangers of creating false beliefs.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 11:07 AM   #42

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I would love my child no matter what, I would go on living my life. However, I would still know that what I did was unethical, and i'd hate myself forever for giving her the potion.
Gotta forgive yourself some time. Ya cant go on hating something forever, not even yourself. Cos hate is poison.

But I'd draw the line somewhere. Ya cant forgive someone who abuses someone else.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 02:25 AM   #43

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You're basically asking if it's ethical to brainwash someone. I don't know how anyone can think it's ethical to take away someone's free will.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 02:51 AM   #44

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The best that one could do, I suppose, is to confess to the potion's receiver what one once did, then ask/beg for her/his forgiveness and undesrtanding. Then hope for the best.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 03:21 AM   #45

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You're basically asking if it's ethical to brainwash someone. I don't know how anyone can think it's ethical to take away someone's free will.
Well the point of thread was to question how much promoting happiness can be important in ethical choice, and whenever our ideals/preconcept have the precedence over happiness.

In the case of a woman unhappy, who becomes happy with the potion, refusing to use it it's pretty much sacrificing her happiness over our own ideal that it's wrong to do so.

I started this thread because I tend to have an utilitarian view of ethics, so this scenario it's pretty annoying (since i'm inclined to view giving the potion as wrong).

What's the discrimen regarding whenever it's right to put one own ideals over promoting happiness?
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Old November 25th, 2012, 07:11 AM   #46

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Definitely not. Love shouldn't be messed about with (even though I don't believe in it).
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Old November 25th, 2012, 08:18 AM   #47

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake10 View Post
Well, my mother is free to do as she likes. While I will not lie about the medicine, I will also not forbid her to take it.

At the same time, we need to keep in mind the extent to which this can go. Making people believe something that is not real can grow and develop into a cult. We've all heard the story of 'How the Volcano Became a God'. There was an eruption, people who didn't understand it were awed, and some thought it was a god. One man in the community realized that he could control them through this, and claimed that the volcano god talked to him in his sleep. He told the people his philosophies, which they agreed with, and then they built a temple where he would advise them, live and they would worship. This is an extreme example, but it does show the dangers of creating false beliefs.

That sounds vaguely familiar.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 08:38 AM   #48

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Originally Posted by The merchant of Venice View Post
Well the point of thread was to question how much promoting happiness can be important in ethical choice, and whenever our ideals/preconcept have the precedence over happiness.

In the case of a woman unhappy, who becomes happy with the potion, refusing to use it it's pretty much sacrificing her happiness over our own ideal that it's wrong to do so.
If it's so ethical then why not present her with the potion and give her the choice of whether to take it or not? Why hide it? Why should it be done without her knowledge? Because if given the choice, she wouldn't take it? That's her right. You take away free will and what's the point to life?

Would you approve of crushing up Prozac and putting it in someone's food or drink without their consent because they're depressed and Prozac is an anti-depressant? Because if so, that's very disturbing. I'm sorry but it's NEVER ethical to drug a competent adult without their consent!

And since when is romantic love the answer to all happiness in life?

Last edited by History Chick; November 25th, 2012 at 09:00 AM.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 09:05 AM   #49

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And since when is romantic love the answer to all happiness in life?
It's not? It's an ipothetic scenario and the love thing it's not the point of it.

And as I stated in my previous post, I'm inclined to view giving the potion as wrong but i recognize that this means putting my own preconcept that it would be wrong over the happiness of another person; an act that I usually can't find acceptable
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Old November 25th, 2012, 03:20 PM   #50

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That sounds vaguely familiar.
Religion can take this route, yes. This is why superstition is so dangerous. Do you have something specific in mind?
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