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Old November 21st, 2012, 12:40 PM   #11

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Originally Posted by MAlexMatt View Post
Our categories for existence and non-existence stop making any sense without the object they're based on.

So, this question doesn't make a whole lot of sense from a strictly rational perspective.
Yes indeed.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 12:45 PM   #12

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how so, its a perfectly reasonable question that people have always wondered at. we'll likely never know the truth yet that should not stop us from wondering.

years ago most people thought the earth was the center of the universe with us as a special place in a divine plan of existence. yet now we know its only in a galaxy which is among billions of others in a universe incomprehensibly big with everything seemingly coming about solely from cause and effect. we seem to be nothing more then accidents of nature so why then is everything the way it is and what part of any do we have in it.
Yet that the universe was created or came from somewhere (did it ever go anywhere?) are our own assumptions that may be unjustified.

The reason we assumed we were the center of the universe, apart from religious sensibilities, was based on observation. We observed that the ground we stand on does not seem to move and the entire heavens appear to move around us.

Maybe the universe (the entirety of matter and energy) has always existed, and our assumption that reality came from somewhere is due to limited observation.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 12:48 PM   #13

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In this moment I'm uncertain between two models.

One suggests a never-ending [so never begun ...] cycle based on the conception that the space time is similar to a p-membrane, an absolute limit. In a far future when the particle will decay this universe will be an enormous expanding bubble of energy at low density running towards ... what? The space time. Touching it, the universe would generate the conditions for a multiple big band ... new starts.

An other model I do like is the one of the inflation [a model which would explain how the universe expanded so quickly]. The problem of this model is that the origin of this inflation is in the fantasy of the scientists [you can indicate what you prefer most].
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Old November 21st, 2012, 01:16 PM   #14

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In this moment I'm uncertain between two models.

One suggests a never-ending [so never begun ...] cycle based on the conception that the space time is similar to a p-membrane, an absolute limit. In a far future when the particle will decay this universe will be an enormous expanding bubble of energy at low density running towards ... what? The space time. Touching it, the universe would generate the conditions for a multiple big band ... new starts.
the idea of these banes coming together and forming space and time between them is an interesting idea and offers some way around dealing with a question of how something could have come from nothing. some will say that string theory is not science as we have no way of testing it yet it has many adherents including Stephen Hawking. the recent test at the large Hadron Collider at Cern was unpromising for string theory as it was thought that the collusion would send some of the energy into these other dimensions leaving less energy then there was at the start yet it didn't do so. yet its hoped that we just need a bigger and more powerful accelerator to test this properly.

its a fascinating theory, if a bit hard to get your head around yet it offers some theory for now.
for those unfamiliar with the theory its very well explained here and gives a history of how the theory came about, its the whole 11 dimensions part that i have real trouble wrapping my mind around
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Old November 21st, 2012, 05:37 PM   #15

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Whether you are talking about God creating the Universe or the Big Bang it still comes down to something creating itself.
Exactly, some thing had to have simply sprung into existence for the universe to exist.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 06:14 PM   #16
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Exactly, some thing had to have simply sprung into existence for the universe to exist.
I don't see where it says God must have been created at some point.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 09:29 PM   #17

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Well the way I see it, the fact that the Universe exists means that either

1.) Something came from nothing

or

2.) The Universe is infinte

Both of these are equally improbable scenarios, but one of them must be true!
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 06:52 AM   #18
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A collision with other multiverses? The answer is just to big for humans (which doesn't mean god is automatically behind it xD). And we may find out in the future, but for now it is still guessing and honestly I think some of the theories we have are close to the answer.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 07:59 AM   #19
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I don't know
What a coincidence; I don't know either.

Even worse, I don't know if it's possible to know.

The Big Bang is not any dogma, it's just humble science.

It is currently by far the best model to explain the available relevant evidence on this issue.
It will predictably be significantly modified by further research in the future, but it seems extremely unlikely that it may ever be entirely falsified.

Religious opinions are faith, by definition an entirely personal issue.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 09:10 AM   #20

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A collision with other multiverses? The answer is just to big for humans (which doesn't mean god is automatically behind it xD). And we may find out in the future, but for now it is still guessing and honestly I think some of the theories we have are close to the answer.
the answer may be beyond our comprehension for the moment. string theory and a multiverse offers some plausible theory even if there is no way to test it out. yet i have heard that in quantum mechanics you can sometimes have an effect without a cause. seems incredible i know yet their are many things in quantum mechanics that makes no sense and even seems to defy rational logic.

a hundred years ago we couldn't imagine that our galaxy is actually one of many, 500 years ago we couldn't imagine that it was the earth which resolved around the sun. if past experiences are anything to go by the truth of the universe is always more then we ever imagined.
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