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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:25 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by Pacific_Victory View Post
Don't they address each other as Righteous Gentlemen or some ridiculous title?

In the house of commons someone in your side is " my honourable friend"

An opponent is reffered to as " the honourable member for........Glasgow Govern ( or wherever it is they represent)

If a government minister is refered to it becomes the Right honourable member
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:27 AM   #12

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The honourable gentleman/lady, (or right honourable if they're a member of the Privy Council). Someone in the member's own party can referred to as my honourable friend.The point is that members only address the Speaker directly, and refer to other members in the third person. If they have to identify a specific member, they refer to them by the name of their constituency, not their personal name. These are old-fashioned ways in which some measure of civility can be maintained in an adversarial system. In the House of Lords, the noble lord, or my noble friend.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:28 AM   #13

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Originally Posted by funakison View Post
In the house of commons someone in your side is " my honourable friend"

An opponent is reffered to as " the honourable member for........Glasgow Govern ( or wherever it is they represent)

If a government minister is refered to it becomes the Right honourable member
Right Honorable Member is what I was thinking of. For some reason I thought it was Right Honorable Gentleman.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:31 AM   #14

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That's right, a privy Councillor will be referred to as 'the right honourable gentleman/lady' or as 'my right honourable friend'.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:33 AM   #15

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That's right, a privy Councillor will be referred to as 'the right honourable gentleman/lady' or as 'my right honourable friend'.
Oh ok got it.

Sounds a bit silly to my ears, but I suppose tradition is tradition.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:35 AM   #16
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Another old fashioned thing about the Commons. There are thick red lines that run along each side of the floor. The members are not allowed to stand beyond these. This goes back to the days when men carried swords. The lines make sure everyone is out of sword range.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:45 AM   #17

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Yes, it's very adversarial, with the governing party and opposition sitting on opposite benches in a relatively small chamber. Though the debates in the upper chamber tend to be calm and thoughtful.

The seating arrangement in the House is designed so that the distance between the two opposite benches is further than a sword can reach.

Apparently.

Personally I think that was a flaw in the design.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:45 AM   #18

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Don't they address each other as Righteous Gentlemen or some ridiculous title?
Members of the House of Commons should not be named in the House and are refered to by their constituency or their title, e.g. The Honourable Member for Huntingdon or the Chancellor of the Exchequer. A member of the Privy Council (a bit of a shadowy outfit that advises the sovereign on issuing Orders in Council) is called "Right Honourable" and is usually a sitting or former minister. MPs refer to members of their own party as "My Honourable (or Right Honourable) Friend" and to others as the "Honourable Gentleman" ( or Lady).
In the House of Lords a member is referred to as "The Noble Lord" or "The Noble and Learned Lord" if he is a member of the legal profession or "the Noble and Gallant Lord" if he has a military background. The Bishops who sit in the HoL are referred to as "the Right Reverend Lord Bishop" or, for an Archbishop "His Grace the Archbishop".
Whether of not it is ridiculous or not should be judged on the fact that its roots are in the Witans of c 600AD and its current form dates from 1264 and has worked with a bit of tinkering pretty well since then. No other existing system has that sort of track record.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:46 AM   #19

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Another old fashioned thing about the Commons. There are thick red lines that run along each side of the floor. The members are not allowed to stand beyond these. This goes back to the days when men carried swords. The lines make sure everyone is out of sword range.
Touche.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 11:47 AM   #20

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A few sword fights in the Commons would liven things up no end!
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