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Old November 23rd, 2012, 12:56 PM   #31

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Thats handy. Perhaps you could explain it to us

Brilliant an absolute classic.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 01:12 PM   #32

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Thank you all for explaining to me the system, I think I understand that pretty well now. Could you please now tell me about some of the most influential politicians? Also, what are the political differences among the parties?
There are 630 odd people in the House of Commons--that's about 630 odd different political opinons. On the "right" (conservative party) one has a man like David Davis who grew up on a council estate (housing project) with a single mother who put himself through University by doing odd jobs and a stint in the Territorial Army, while on the "Left" (Labour Party) one has someone like Harriet Harman, the product of the priviliged upper-middle class the neice of a countess and the product of the top girls private school.
The current Prime Minister is descended from King William IV, is a cousin of the Queen, went to the best possible school (Eton) has a wife descended from Charles II and is probably the most left-wing conservative leader ever.
Differences between the different political parties can be measured with a micrometer.
The most influential politician with the public this year is undoubtedly Boris Johnson who is not in Parliament, but is the Mayor of London. He pretends to act like a complete buffoon but is actually brilliant--the opposite of most other politicians.

You may also like to read up on this Party.
Official_Monster_Raving_Loony_Party Official_Monster_Raving_Loony_Party

Last edited by Ancientgeezer; November 23rd, 2012 at 01:18 PM.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 01:49 PM   #33

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Each political party chooses a leader at times of their own choosing and the leader of the largest party after an election is invited to form a government with the leader of that party automaticaly becoming prime minister.
The leader of the ruling political party normally becomes Prime Minister but it's not always so.
In May 1940 after Churchill was appointed PM, Chamberlain remained the leader of the Conservative party until his death in November of that year.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:04 PM   #34

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I am glad you said it as well. I was half expecting someone to say it was one of those urban myths.
Have you looked into a career in comedy?
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:05 PM   #35

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The current Prime Minister is descended from King William IV, is a cousin of the Queen, went to the best possible school (Eton) has a wife descended from Charles II and is probably the most left-wing conservative leader ever.
This isn't perhaps so very surprising, since upper crust Tories tend to be on the left of the party; there have been relatively few among hardline Thatcherites. Another factor is that Cameron is an archetypal career politician who seems to have no very defined views or principles, so he chose head for the middle ground for electoral reasons. (To say that he's a cousin of the Queen is misleading, he's a very distant cousin, 5th or 6th or something like that.)
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:13 PM   #36

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This isn't perhaps so very surprising, since upper crust Tories tend to be on the left of the party; there have been relatively few among hardline Thatcherites. Another factor is that Cameron is an archetypal career politician who seems to have no very defined views or principles, so he chose head for the middle ground for electoral reasons. (To say that he's a cousin of the Queen is misleading, he's a very distant cousin, 5th or 6th or something like that.)
I was under the impression that most of the upper crust in Britain related to or descended from current or formal royalty of some sort.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:15 PM   #37

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Members of the House of Commons should not be named in the House and are refered to by their constituency or their title, e.g. The Honourable Member for Huntingdon or the Chancellor of the Exchequer. A member of the Privy Council (a bit of a shadowy outfit that advises the sovereign on issuing Orders in Council) is called "Right Honourable" and is usually a sitting or former minister. MPs refer to members of their own party as "My Honourable (or Right Honourable) Friend" and to others as the "Honourable Gentleman" ( or Lady).
In the House of Lords a member is referred to as "The Noble Lord" or "The Noble and Learned Lord" if he is a member of the legal profession or "the Noble and Gallant Lord" if he has a military background. The Bishops who sit in the HoL are referred to as "the Right Reverend Lord Bishop" or, for an Archbishop "His Grace the Archbishop".
Whether of not it is ridiculous or not should be judged on the fact that its roots are in the Witans of c 600AD and its current form dates from 1264 and has worked with a bit of tinkering pretty well since then. No other existing system has that sort of track record.
It must be a nightmare remembering to use which title on who in the excitement of a heated debate.

Especially the House of Lords titles. :0
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:17 PM   #38
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Have you looked into a career in comedy?
I thought about it











But timing isn't my strong suit.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 02:31 PM   #39

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Actually the Lords may and does propose legislation. However it may not propose any money bill or any bill that affects how money is raised or distributed by the Treasury. It may also not delay or block any bills that have been previously proposed by the Ruling Party in the Commons in an election manifesto.
The Lords has, this session, introduced 32 bills including:-
Arbitration and Mediation Services (Equality) Bill
Alan Turing (Statutory Pardon) Bill
Caravan Sites Bill
City of London (Various Powers) Bill [HL]
Electric Personal Vehicles (Use on Highways) Bill [HL]
Mental Health (Discrimination) Bill [HL]

Which just shows their priorities!
Yes of course private members bills, most of which will never see the light of day. But the point i was trying to make was that the lords does not introduce government legislation.
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Old November 23rd, 2012, 04:04 PM   #40

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Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
There are 630 odd people in the House of Commons--that's about 630 odd different political opinons. On the "right" (conservative party) one has a man like David Davis who grew up on a council estate (housing project) with a single mother who put himself through University by doing odd jobs and a stint in the Territorial Army, while on the "Left" (Labour Party) one has someone like Harriet Harman, the product of the priviliged upper-middle class the neice of a countess and the product of the top girls private school.
The current Prime Minister is descended from King William IV, is a cousin of the Queen, went to the best possible school (Eton) has a wife descended from Charles II and is probably the most left-wing conservative leader ever.
Differences between the different political parties can be measured with a micrometer.
The most influential politician with the public this year is undoubtedly Boris Johnson who is not in Parliament, but is the Mayor of London. He pretends to act like a complete buffoon but is actually brilliant--the opposite of most other politicians.

You may also like to read up on this Party. Official Monster Raving Loony Party - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


BoJo rocks, I almost ran him over on his bike in Islington, wouldn't have been too good to run over the Mayor. I hope he runs for PM as he'd have my vote.

I'm not sure if he got a first at Cambridge, but he is very affable and has style, which is more than most politicians have. I still haven't forgiven them for the expenses scandal and buying duck islands whilst our soldiers went to war with inadequate kit.
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