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Old November 24th, 2012, 08:17 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Naomasa298 View Post
I think resistance is futile.
Good point. If we don't except diversity we will all become Borgs
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Old November 24th, 2012, 01:49 PM   #12

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While Russia has a great deal of natural resources, making them a significant economic power in the world, I don't see them having a great deal of cultural influence on other countries. I mean, how much soft power do the Russians have?
They have prtetty nice relationship with nations like India, China and some countries in the Middle East and just take a look at the weapon of choice of the African countries wherein AK47 is even used by one of the nations there as an emblem of their flag. Their technology is very influential over those nations and they'd been among the ranking world leaders during the time of Ivan, Peter, Stalin till the end of the Cold War. They have history of leadership and play of power in the world.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 02:01 PM   #13

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India could very well be an example of societies to come. They have over 30 official dialects as well as unofficial ones, yet English unites them all. Their education is conducted in English, and people from different regions doing business use English to communicate. India still needs to develop parts of the country, but as that happens competition between them and China will increase. I see them supporting the English cultural influence, since that would be to their benefit.
I agree with you that India is actually into the assimilation with the English speaking nations that's spearheaded by the U.S. and followed by the U.K. and the rest of the commonwealth nations and other European countries, but, as I'd stated its role can be very tricky comes the point that Russia shall emerge as one of the most influential world power once again, and India shall be on its side.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 03:15 PM   #14

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I agree with you that India is actually into the assimilation with the English speaking nations that's spearheaded by the U.S. and followed by the U.K. and the rest of the commonwealth nations and other European countries, but, as I'd stated its role can be very tricky comes the point that Russia shall emerge as one of the most influential world power once again, and India shall be on its side.
It's one thing for India to side with Russia on political matters, which they might do to keep the US from dominating too much. Actually, that's often the reason China and Russia cooperate.

But, if we're talking about forming a global culture, then I don't see an advantage for India to do that. India has already established an English foundation in their country. Changing that to Russian would mean undoing the work of several generations to start re-building something completely different.

Let me just ask you a couple of questions:

1. How many people around the world are learning English? How many are learning Chinese? Spanish? Russian?

2. Taking into consideration that the most successful products are not always the best, but the best marketed, do you see Russian products taking the upper hand around the world? The AK47 is a fine gun, but I wonder if availability is what has made it so popular.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 03:27 PM   #15

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Jake, I know of the vast number of people who are trying to learn English and in fact my sister who is a professor in one of the universities here in the Philippines is being offered a teaching job in South Korea to teach English to them. China and Japan are also learning the language and I think it shall be the dominant language of the world for the next 100 years having attained its status as the lingua franca.

My point regarding Russia as a force to reckon with is that I see it to be the nation that shall take the recent position of China as the regional power in Asia that seems to be the next after the U.S. The European nations seems to be staggering and the combination of France and Germany appears to be in keeping with the U.S. and the rest of English speaking nations in terms of cultural impact in the world, so it is my perception that someday Russia will rise up again replacing the role of China in the current world events.
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Old November 24th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #16

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Good point. If we don't except diversity we will all become Borgs
Jokes put aside, some of the trends in technology make me wonder how dependent on it we will be. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for implants that allow blind people to read, robotic hands to replace amputated limbs, and exoskeletons that enable paraplegics to walk, but we're also seeing developments in brain implants that can make us more intelligent. When I talk about a global translator, I'm not sure what it will look like. The idea of technology replacing aspects of humanity is a turn off for me, yet surprisingly, a lot of our fellow forum members don't mind the idea of becoming cyborgs.



http://www.historum.com/lounge/45900...-cyborg-2.html
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Old November 24th, 2012, 10:11 PM   #17

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Amidst your discussions , I have a doubt .
IS it only the language that counts for assimilation ?

Honestly , I feel language is only a part of the culture [ an important one though] and assimilation does mean , one culture more or less comprehensively absorbs the other into it without any further independent identity of the absorbed one .
So , I suppose , it would be clear [ to me ] if someone elaborates on the factors that are included under assimilation
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Old November 24th, 2012, 11:12 PM   #18

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Amidst your discussions , I have a doubt .
IS it only the language that counts for assimilation ?

Honestly , I feel language is only a part of the culture [ an important one though] and assimilation does mean , one culture more or less comprehensively absorbs the other into it without any further independent identity of the absorbed one .
So , I suppose , it would be clear [ to me ] if someone elaborates on the factors that are included under assimilation
Culture and language are interlinked. The easiest way to change a culture is to change the language. You could say that language determines culture, but there are other factors. Clothing, religion, customs, ambient, food, etcetera all influence a culture.

A look at Canada shows this, since most things are the same between Quebec and the rest of the country, yet the dividing cultural factor of language still remains and maintains a certain degree of segregation. The example illustrated of France in a previous post, however, shows that a country obtains unity and patriotism when the different peoples speak the same language.

Assimilation is complex. China is a good model for investigating assimilation, since several nations and cultures have been assimilated by the Han Chinese. Inner Mongolia and Tibet still maintain their native languages, and have not been fully assimilated. The Manchus, on the other hand, now identify themselves completely as Chinese, mostly because their language is all but gone. Nevertheless, based on their history they do not consider themselves Han.

When we're talking about globalization and assimilation, it is unlikely that complete cultures will be absorbed. Instead, their history and identity will remain, but a unifying culture will interlink the different parts of the globe, as I indicated with India. The key factor to doing this is through language. Other factors will also influence this, as we see several different countries around the world which have adopted western clothing, brand names, food and celebrations. Places like China, Japan and Thailand have done this, but their cultures are still different because their language remains.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 12:33 AM   #19

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I see a lot of the assimilation from globalization to be rather superficial. Nowadays in most countries people wear Western clothing instead of their traditional clothing and they often watch American movies, listen to American music and eat American food. That doesn't mean that their own cultures are dominated by America or that they are going to start thinking the same as Americans or Westerners. While Western clothing has replaced traditional clothing in most countries, it hasn't replaced music or traditional food globally and I don't think it will. It's just given people more options.
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Old November 25th, 2012, 02:02 AM   #20

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^I agree with you, Antocya, that appreciation of those things like music and garments does not erase the culture of those people who are into them, but when the assimilation goes down unto the use of laws which involves the relationship of the citizens of the state and the extent of powers of the governmental authority over them, the adoption of the form of government and ideology such as the consideration and perception about human rights and civil liberties, the adaptation on the use of medicine, diet and general outlook over consumerism resulting unto celebration of commercial festivals like Valentines and Halloween, the appreciation of Western sports like cricket, tennis and basketball, that creates a deeper meaning over assimilation.

@Manjas, I don't think that assimilation is only about the language, because as I'd stated, it includes the way of life of the people, the laws that govern them and even the use of kitchen wares like spoon and fork in contrast to chopsticks.
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