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Old January 16th, 2013, 08:32 PM   #1

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Milton Friedman?


What do you think of Milton Friedman and his ideas?
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Old January 16th, 2013, 08:54 PM   #2

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Shabby and weak moral philosophy based on Ayn Rand trying to pass off as sound political economy.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 11:01 PM   #3

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I consider him one of the most dangerous men of the 20th century, partly responsible for the idealisation of destruction capitalism, aka neoliberalism. From the 80's and onward, the implementation of certain ideas of his (and of the Chicago school of economics) by Reagan in the US, Thatcher in the UK, Pinochet in Chile, the IMF in various parts of the world, led to the misery of millions, the sharp increase in global inequality, and laid the foundation for our current world crisis because of the banking deregulation.

Naomi Klein has some interesting things to say in her excellent book "the shock doctrine".

The Shock Doctrine 2009 - YouTube
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Old January 17th, 2013, 12:53 AM   #4
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I consider him one of the most dangerous men of the 20th century, partly responsible for the idealisation of destruction capitalism, aka neoliberalism. From the 80's and onward, the implementation of certain ideas of his (and of the Chicago school of economics) by Reagan in the US, Thatcher in the UK, Pinochet in Chile, the IMF in various parts of the world, led to the misery of millions, the sharp increase in global inequality, and laid the foundation for our current world crisis because of the banking deregulation.

Naomi Klein has some interesting things to say in her excellent book "the shock doctrine".

The Shock Doctrine 2009 - YouTube
But in the 70s, Britain faced bankruptcy, at least partly as a result of the Keynesian economic policy being practised at the time. The development of actual practise is probably not what the theorists envisaged in the first place.
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Old January 17th, 2013, 01:23 AM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solidaire View Post
I consider him one of the most dangerous men of the 20th century, partly responsible for the idealisation of destruction capitalism, aka neoliberalism. From the 80's and onward, the implementation of certain ideas of his (and of the Chicago school of economics) by Reagan in the US, Thatcher in the UK, Pinochet in Chile, the IMF in various parts of the world, led to the misery of millions, the sharp increase in global inequality, and laid the foundation for our current world crisis because of the banking deregulation.

Naomi Klein has some interesting things to say in her excellent book "the shock doctrine".

The Shock Doctrine 2009 - YouTube

Exactly, I was going to put him top of the 15 most evil men ever post, but couldn't think of 14 others in his league.
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Old January 17th, 2013, 01:43 AM   #6

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What do you think of Milton Friedman and his ideas?
I think he's a great lecturer with some great points. I do not agree with his preferred utopia, since I believe the existence of a state warrants physical protection, not "merely" from aggression by other humans but also from the many wants of life. My preferrable Liberal idol would be
John_Stuart_Mill John_Stuart_Mill
but on the whole he is a greater economist and a greater humanitarian than Karl Marx. Also, I may appreciate even now the sensation of his (and other economists', not excluding Marx', had he been on Youtube) vicinity to the listeners. I would've liked to be there to ask questions myself.

This would be one of my favorites. I find the difference between the lecturer and the student asking the question hilarious; a great combo.


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Exactly, I was going to put him top of the 15 most evil men ever post, but couldn't think of 14 others in his league.
You make me laugh.
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Old January 18th, 2013, 02:06 AM   #7

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Capitalism is a necessary condition for freedom -------from the video. What does that mean?
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Old January 18th, 2013, 02:12 AM   #8

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But in the 70s, Britain faced bankruptcy, at least partly as a result of the Keynesian economic policy being practised at the time. The development of actual practise is probably not what the theorists envisaged in the first place.
Milton Friedman 's neoliberalism turned out exactly as envisaged. Using junk economic theory to reduce living standards, lower wages, privatise state assets and increasing the wealth of an oligarghy at the expense of society.

What does it mean to blame Keynesian economics for bankruptcy of any country?
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Old January 18th, 2013, 02:17 AM   #9

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Capitalism is a necessary condition for freedom -------from the video. What does that mean?
He suggests (opposed to the alleged statement by him that a deregulated capitalist economy will naturally lead to personal and civil liberties for all, which obviously isn't true) that democracy and personal freedom can only be found where you have, basically, a capitalist economy. In essense, what Hayek suggested in ''The Road to Serfdom''; state socialism will inevietably lead to decreasing personal liberties and an authoritarian state.

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increasing the wealth of an oligarghy at the expense of society.
What is society?

I also think you're misusing the inherent definition of "oligarchy".
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Old January 18th, 2013, 04:16 AM   #10

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In essense, what Hayek suggested in ''The Road to Serfdom''; state socialism will inevietably lead to decreasing personal liberties and an authoritarian state.
From your experience, since you live in Sweden, is that in any way true?
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