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Old January 7th, 2017, 09:03 PM   #1
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What if the Liberal Party dominated interwar Britain


It sounds unthinkable, but how would Britain look like if the Liberal Party dominated the interwar politics instead of the Tories like in real history? What would be their economic policy, and how would be the performance of British economy?
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Old January 9th, 2017, 05:38 AM   #2

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It sounds unthinkable, but how would Britain look like if the Liberal Party dominated the interwar politics instead of the Tories like in real history? What would be their economic policy, and how would be the performance of British economy?
Much the same I would imagine. The lack of new ideas was a main reason for the labour landslide in 1945. Liberals and Conservatives roughly alternated power under Queen Victoria, but Britain was still much the same until WWI changed everything of the old world.
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Old January 9th, 2017, 05:44 AM   #3
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The British politics is to a certain degree conservative. However, unlike fellow conservative nation like Spain, it has the political will to impose the rule of law. Its politics is so close to the Dutch. All of them were able to transform to democracy without executing genocide to their respective monarch. Unlike France and Russia. I am citing Russia only in reference to the kind of bloody revolution that is akin to French but not in regard to democracy.

So you are correct John. Briexit is very British.
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Old January 9th, 2017, 05:52 AM   #4

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The British politics is to a certain degree conservative. However, unlike fellow conservative nation like Spain, it has the political will to impose the rule of law. Its politics is so close to the Dutch. All of them were able to transform to democracy without executing genocide to their respective monarch. Unlike France and Russia. I am citing Russia only in reference to the kind of bloody revolution that is akin to French but not in regard to democracy.

So you are correct John. Briexit is very British.
Address the topic in the OP, not other events.
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Old January 9th, 2017, 06:03 AM   #5
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Address the topic in the OP, not other events.
I submit that is my way of discussing it.
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Old January 9th, 2017, 06:38 AM   #6
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Much the same I would imagine. The lack of new ideas was a main reason for the labour landslide in 1945. Liberals and Conservatives roughly alternated power under Queen Victoria, but Britain was still much the same until WWI changed everything of the old world.
Well, I think with more reforms and more economic interventionism, as they were already moving away from laissez faire, including even Asquith. Maybe no intervention in Russia and Turkey, so earlier military speding cuts for more public works and services. Also no repeal of Land Value Tax, a big source of revenue. Note that Loyd George wanted to implement large public works from as early as 1921 but was opposed by the Tories.

Keynes would have greater influence in British policy than IOTL.

Last edited by Thomson1190; January 9th, 2017 at 06:42 AM.
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Old January 11th, 2017, 01:29 AM   #7

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You seem to have high optimism for the Liberals, a view not currently shared by the British electorate, who nearly exterminated them.
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Old January 11th, 2017, 02:01 AM   #8
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You seem to have high optimism for the Liberals, a view not currently shared by the British electorate, who nearly exterminated them.
You're not going to drag us into current politics are you?
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Old January 11th, 2017, 02:03 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Thomson1190 View Post
Well, I think with more reforms and more economic interventionism, as they were already moving away from laissez faire, including even Asquith. Maybe no intervention in Russia and Turkey, so earlier military speding cuts for more public works and services. Also no repeal of Land Value Tax, a big source of revenue. Note that Loyd George wanted to implement large public works from as early as 1921 but was opposed by the Tories.

Keynes would have greater influence in British policy than IOTL.
If we're thinking of the same events, the Russian and Turkish interventions took place during the time of the Coalition Government elected in 1918. In any event, the Liberals were hopelessly divided during the 1920s, weren't they?
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Old January 12th, 2017, 05:35 AM   #10
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If we're thinking of the same events, the Russian and Turkish interventions took place during the time of the Coalition Government elected in 1918. In any event, the Liberals were hopelessly divided during the 1920s, weren't they?
I know. But if the Liberal was in power, they would not intervene, as many of them were antiwar at heart.

To make the Liberal dominant in the interwar, a POD (Point of Divergence) no later than December 1916 is required. The best scenario is:

Asquith retiring from politics voluntarily because the death of his son broke him (lets say much more than IOTL). (The key problem was that Asquith was a weak leader surrounded by a group of bright men). Then LG succeeds him both as PM and Leader of Liberals.

I fear that in this case there would be DLGmocracy rather than democracy.

Last edited by Thomson1190; January 12th, 2017 at 05:52 AM.
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