Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > Speculative History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Speculative History Speculative History Forum - Alternate History, What If Questions, Pseudo History, and anything outside the boundaries of mainstream historical research


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 11th, 2017, 11:50 PM   #1
Citizen
 
Joined: Nov 2016
From: Romania
Posts: 31
Will authoritarian regimes come back?


With China s rapid growth and countries like Iran and Saudi Arabia focusing more and more on their military will the authoritarian regimes be able to spread communism/monarchy in the world or will enlightenment values transform the authoritarian regimes in democracies with freedom of expression?Also,are enlightenment values embedded in Indian culture by now or not?
FatDoggy is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 12th, 2017, 12:37 AM   #2

johnincornwall's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Cornwall
Posts: 5,553

I'm not sure exactly what you mean but it might be worth observing that once upon a time, Communism, Marxism etcf etc were fantastic new worlds that people could aspire to, born out of the political upheavals of the 19th century and early 20th.

I think it must surely be a case of 'been there, tried that' for the human race. Maybe best to avoid the likes of Stalin, Ceaucescu, Honneker, Mao etc etc, if at all possible?

It's no longer a bright new future, it's mostly a past full of terror.
johnincornwall is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 12:56 AM   #3

Tulius's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: May 2016
From: Portugal
Posts: 2,014

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnincornwall View Post
I'm not sure exactly what you mean but it might be worth observing that once upon a time, Communism, Marxism etcf etc were fantastic new worlds that people could aspire to, born out of the political upheavals of the 19th century and early 20th.

I think it must surely be a case of 'been there, tried that' for the human race. Maybe best to avoid the likes of Stalin, Ceaucescu, Honneker, Mao etc etc, if at all possible?

It's no longer a bright new future, it's mostly a past full of terror.
Well said.

And let us not forget that the “authoritarian regimes” never really went away, even if some utopist thinkers could had think so when the saw the wall in Berlin being dismantled in 1989.

But the authoritarian regimes referred by the OP already existed in 1989. Others felt, others arise… that happened in the past and probably will happen in the future.

We know that history doesn’t repeat itself, but as many people today begin to note that there are some similarities between the arise of the populism today and the arise of right wing movements in the 1920’s and 1930’s… and we already made that path and know where it leads…
Tulius is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 04:05 AM   #4

starman's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Connecticut
Posts: 2,552

Quote:
Originally Posted by FatDoggy View Post
With China s rapid growth and countries like Iran and Saudi Arabia focusing more and more on their military will the authoritarian regimes be able to spread communism/monarchy in the world
No. Both are passe, and I don't think those countries have much ideological appeal outside their borders. But I believe authoritarianism will come back, big time, in part because democratic government just can't seem to handle problems like deficits, and environmental degradation.
starman is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 04:10 AM   #5

starman's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Connecticut
Posts: 2,552

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnincornwall View Post
I'm not sure exactly what you mean but it might be worth observing that once upon a time, Communism, Marxism etcf etc were fantastic new worlds that people could aspire to, born out of the political upheavals of the 19th century and early 20th.

I think it must surely be a case of 'been there, tried that' for the human race. Maybe best to avoid the likes of Stalin, Ceaucescu, Honneker, Mao etc etc, if at all possible?

It's no longer a bright new future, it's mostly a past full of terror.
Well, back in the early days of communism, wasn't revolution a "past full of terror"? Look at the French revolution and what that led to. It didn't stop new revolutionary movements and successes. If some people believe they have the truth and the answer, they won't shrink from doing what they feel they must to succeed.
starman is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 04:17 AM   #6

johnincornwall's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Cornwall
Posts: 5,553

Quote:
Originally Posted by starman View Post
Well, back in the early days of communism, wasn't revolution a "past full of terror"? Look at the French revolution and what that led to. It didn't stop new revolutionary movements and successes. If some people believe they have the truth and the answer, they won't shrink from doing what they feel they must to succeed.
No communism etc and even anarchism was a great hope to people. The sort of associated disturbances, anti-regime, anti-burgeouisie, anti-church, all that sort of thing, has it's roots partly in absolutism v liberalism and migrated into the polarised politics of the early 20th century. The left had a fairly large swell of support, which was of course counter-balanced by a fear of the left driving other reasonable people to the right.

The French revolution was a very short-lived experience as such. Whereas many parts of the world lived under various guises of communism for decades and, despite what friend Iwan promotes here, I don't believe it was a perfecrtly worry-free existence to say the least.

I suppose the danger is that the memory of the likes of Mao, Stalin and Ceaucescu fades and the whole cycle starts again.
johnincornwall is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 04:45 AM   #7

starman's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2014
From: Connecticut
Posts: 2,552

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnincornwall View Post
No communism etc and even anarchism was a great hope to people.
Yes, despite what happened in the French revolution.

Quote:
The French revolution was a very short-lived experience as such.
Not all that short if you include its outcome, the Napoleonic period.

Quote:
Whereas many parts of the world lived under various guises of communism for decades and, despite what friend Iwan promotes here, I don't believe it was a perfecrtly worry-free existence to say the least.
Of course not. But it had a lot of appeal for some time, and it did achieve a lot. Brutal as Stalin was, he was well-suited to his times, and probably made the difference between victory and annihilation.

Quote:
I suppose the danger is that the memory of the likes of Mao, Stalin and Ceaucescu fades and the whole cycle starts again.
I think inevitably, if democratic government just doesn't act more decisively, which it seems chronically incapable of doing, certain problems will become so acute, they will greatly outweigh the potential drawbacks of authoritarian government (from the point of view of the individual, based on past experience).
starman is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 06:33 AM   #8

YouLoveMeYouKnowIt's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2013
From: Canada
Posts: 3,532

No, I don't think so. More like the current one will stay but continue to evolve and reform for the good.
YouLoveMeYouKnowIt is online now  
Old January 12th, 2017, 09:32 AM   #9

robto's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: Lisbon, Portugal
Posts: 4,708

The French Revolution was actually an historical success. Not because it turned France into a perfect democracy or anything, but it effectively ended the Ancién Regime social structure and the ideas professed by the French revolutionaries expanded throughout the world and directly influenced almost every great political reform or revolutionary movement in every place in the world until the Russian revolution in 1917.

I don't think the French Revolution should be used as a an example of false hope or something that led to a negative legacy.
robto is offline  
Old January 12th, 2017, 05:56 PM   #10

Guaporense's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Brazil
Posts: 4,712
Blog Entries: 10

Indeed the French Revolution was like the single most important and successful historical even ever. It helped to create our modern democratic world.

Well, authoritarian regimes tend to be the dominant form of government. Democracies tend to be rare and never in history they were so common as they are today (in terms of the fraction of the world's population under democratic governments). Still authoritarian regimes are still among the most common: Iran, China, Russia among many other countries are authoritarian, even developed countries like Singapore are authoritarian today. I think that the US might become authoritarian if they continue to elect people like Trump but it would be a long process. I don't think there is a real risk most Western countries will become authoritarian.
Guaporense is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > Speculative History

Tags
authoritarian, regimes



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Were European monarchs absoltuely authoritarian? dmit European History 15 April 20th, 2015 09:26 AM
Benevolent Authoritarian Versus Chaotic Representitive Edmond Dantes Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 4 May 31st, 2013 11:28 PM
Are you an authoritarian or a revolutionary at heart? jeroenrottgering Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 10 March 2nd, 2012 06:04 AM
Are all regimes a plutocracy? sylla1 Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 19 January 18th, 2012 10:58 AM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.