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Old December 12th, 2017, 11:37 AM   #11
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I've done a good deal of this myself, including languages. It's pretty fun, honestly.
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Old December 12th, 2017, 12:40 PM   #12

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naima View Post
I did something similar here:
That is very cool Naima. Did you use the real world as inspiration? I can kind of see Europe in Aerdea for instance, with Thule as Britain, Quernia France, Cuaria the Iberian Peninsula, Ausonia Italy, Draxis Greece, ect.
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Old December 12th, 2017, 02:38 PM   #13
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There are many fun things you can do. Here are some ideas:
- Your "Africa" can have horses.
- Your "America" can have an old and advanced writing tradition.
- One of the major powers can be a matriarcy (Ruled mainland by women)
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Old December 13th, 2017, 02:11 AM   #14

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaeva View Post
That is very cool Naima. Did you use the real world as inspiration? I can kind of see Europe in Aerdea for instance, with Thule as Britain, Quernia France, Cuaria the Iberian Peninsula, Ausonia Italy, Draxis Greece, ect.
Thankyou !
Yes the inspiration is directly coming from real world, I wanted to recreate a pseudofictional Earth with a different , but not so much landform and see what comes up inventing a possible history timeline depending also on the geography of the new world .
I also invented pseudo languages based on Ancient ones like Indoeuropean reconstructed, latin , greek , chinese, german , celt , sumerian etc .
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Old December 13th, 2017, 10:08 AM   #15
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this site might be useful:

https://www.google.com/search?q=worl...hrome&ie=UTF-8

And this one:

https://www.google.com/search?q=worl...hrome&ie=UTF-8
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Old December 14th, 2017, 05:06 AM   #16
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Thank you so much! I have received a ton of information from you all regarding world building.

I also want to create a history timeline, evolving language, forms of architecture, military and warfare etc.
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Old December 14th, 2017, 07:24 AM   #17
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History timeline - avoid randomness. Things happen for a reason. Think cause and effect. Positive change occurs only slowly. Catastrophe can occur quickly. The dinosaurs went extinct because of a comet strike. More than one civilization declined because of a natural disaster. Crisis and opportunity usually go hand-in-hand. The working class benefited from the Black Death. Serfdom ended and the labor shortage left behind by the Black Death put an upward pressure on wages. On the other hand, the established powers, such as the Medieval nobility, lost much of their influence over the rest of society.

Evolving language - people invent words to describe the things around them. They never have words for things they never experience. Eskimos have dozens of words for snow. Wet snow, dry snow, freshly fallen snow, old snow, wind-blown snow, snow that has melted and then refrozen, big snow flakes, small snow flakes, etc. All have different and unique words in the Eskimo languages. Snow is so infrequent in our experience that we only need the word 'snow' to describe it. Because snow is so ubiquitous in the Eskimo experience, they invented many different words to describe different kinds of snow.
The Eskimos probably have no word that means tropical rain forest. I saw the following on TV and don't know if it's true or not but it illustrates the point: For centuries no one knew where the Slavic peoples came from. Then someone realized there were no Slavic words for oak tree. When the Slavs migrated to parts of Europe where there were oak trees the Slavs borrowed the word for oak tree from another language. The researchers went looking for a place where there were no oak trees and concluded the Slavs came from the Pripet Marshes of western Russia. When Eskimos first learned from outsiders about tropical rain forests, the Eskimos did not invent a new word. They borrowed the phrase 'tropical rain forest' from the outsider's language.

The first rule of architecture is that form follows function - what a building looks like is determined by what it is intended to do. Early Middle Eastern temples, called Ziggurats consisted of raised platforms accessed by long staircases so that the priests could be closer to the gods and also so that they could perform ceremonies in front of a large audience. Greek temples were also raised and had roofs but no walls so that the priests could divine the will the gods be watching the weather or the flight of birds or other natural events. Christian churches are completely enclosed. Even the windows are stained glass, because what happens inside the church has nothing to do with what's happening outside.
Another rule of architecture - build using local materials. People with no access to trees don't build with wood. Eskimos build using ice and snow. Desert people build with stone or bricks. People who live in tents have access to some kind of textile - either animal skins or wool.

Military and warfare - I already touched on some of this. Armies will not be equipped with swords unless they have access to iron or some other hard metal. Armies that only have access to wood will fight with bows and arrows and other wooden weapons.
Strategy is the blending of objectives and resources. What does a country want its army to do? What resources does a country have to expend on its military? Switzerland has no need of a navy. Britain needs its navy more than it needs its army. Britain has always been a trading nation so they have lots of ship building expertise and a large merchant marine that can provide experienced sailors. The US used to be isolated and could get by with a militia-based army. When the US took on more global responsibilities we switched to a large standing army. The US does not deploy its army along the friendly Canadian and Mexican borders. We equip our army to rapidly deploy anywhere in the world, via, in part, a large fleet of transport aircraft. A country with purely local interests does not need a global deployment capability. South Korea, on the other hand, must deploy its army along its hostile border with North Korea. When a country develops capabilities it does not need, it tends to make other countries nervous - for instance Germany building a large navy before WW1.
Geography also plays a role. Steppe peoples develop cavalry and cavalry tactics for a reason. People who live in forests or mountains rarely develop cavalry. On the steppes you can see your enemy while he's still a long way off, so steppe people probably won't develop ambush tactics. Mountain and forest people, with lots of places to hide, probably will use ambush tactics. There's a reason they call it a battlefield - if two armies are going to maneuver against each other they need an open space to do it in. It's much more difficult to coordinate the actions of an army in a forest or other enclosed space. Forest fighting tends to resemble skirmishing rather than mass maneuver. Decisions are made by lower ranking leaders. Forest combat consists of numerous simultaneous fire fights rather than a single coordinated mass battle.
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Old December 14th, 2017, 10:52 PM   #18
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Thanks for such a detailed reply Chlodio! I would certainly follow these guidelines.
I had another question, How long or geberations does it take for cultural assimilation? For example, Andalian tribes invades the Doricids and takes over their territories. In how many generations a new people called 'Andricids' emerges.
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Old December 15th, 2017, 04:42 AM   #19
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As a minimum, at least three or four generations, depending on how long people live. You need at least one generation to be born and to live their entire lives with no direct experience of the previous purely Andalian or purely Doricid culture. So long as anyone is still alive who remembers Andalian or Doricid independence then the process of assimilation is not yet complete.

The biggest variable is how mutually agreeable assimilation is. If either the Andalians or Doricids resent being absorbed by the other, then they will resist assimilation. Ireland was part of the United Kingdom for centuries, but when the opportunity for independence arose in the 20th century, most of the Irish chose independence. Scotland has been part of the United Kingdom for 300 years, but a strong sense of Scottish identity still exists. A few years ago Scotland almost voted for independence.

The Romans were excellent assimilators. A new portion of the empire might be fully Romanized within three or four generations of conquest.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 03:48 AM   #20
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I at some point was setting up a later cancelled low fantasy campaign set in antique times in the Indus Valley. The campaign was never properly started, we only played a couple of games, but I kind of liked one of my ideas from that; fantastic creatures all being unique. The reasoning I used was that they were avatars of lesser demons and that the later Hindu beliefs could have been based in reality.

All fantasy of course, but it would have allowed me to plunder actual Hindu mythology for various one-off fantasy encounters that if/when defeated would have been forced to leave this plane. The only magic available to humans would have been in the form of dealing with these demons. These were supposed to be rare, more like the focus of the campaign story rather than standard monsters to off every session.
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