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Old December 11th, 2017, 06:27 AM   #1

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The greater plan of Caesar


Plutarch of Chaeronea: Life of Julius Caesar.


[58.6] He had made his plans and preparations for an expedition against the Parthians; after conquering them he proposed to march round the Black Sea by way of Hyrcania, the Caspian Sea, and the Caucasus; he would then invade Scythia,

[58.7] would overrun all the countries bordering on Germania and Germania itself, and would then return to Italy by way of Gaul, thus completing the circuit of his empire which would be bounded on all sides by the ocean.

[58.8] While this expedition was going on he proposed to dig a canal through the isthmus of Corinth, and had already put Anienus in charge of this undertaking. He also planned to divert the Tiber just below the city into a deep channel, which would bend round towards Circeii and come out into the sea at Terracina, so that there would be a safe and easy passage for merchantmen to Rome.

Would he be successfull?
What would have been Rome like after?
What would he change of the plan once he discovered new geography?
How would he do against Germans and scythians?


How would be the world after?
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Old December 11th, 2017, 06:29 AM   #2

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A true gambit of the great. if it works he would have a empire that spanned the entire known world (for the romans) and would have been absolutely immense in population and power.

Don't think it would have lasted though.

If it failed. well he would have been gold down throat to death.
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Old December 16th, 2017, 01:55 AM   #3

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I found a book just on that scenario...

Caesar Ascending – Invasion of Parthia
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Old December 18th, 2017, 02:44 AM   #4
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IF succesfull in each campaign, he would eventually die while attempting to make yeat another conquest. Like Alexander, his idol. Then much of this empire may eventually have fallen apart.
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Old December 18th, 2017, 03:09 AM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fantasus View Post
IF succesfull in each campaign, he would eventually die while attempting to make yeat another conquest.
By the time he reached 60, he might've decided to call it a day.

Quote:
Like Alexander, his idol. Then much of this empire may eventually have fallen apart.
Eventually yes but how soon is "eventually"?
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Old December 18th, 2017, 10:16 AM   #6
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Given the very poor cartography of the time (exactly how is Germania "bounded by the oceans" ?) these "plans" were very rough intents.. Intelligence about ennemy strength was likewise poor... Just like Alexander he would have eventually found out that geography does not conform to one's wishful thinking. Nor does the enemy for that matter
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Old December 28th, 2017, 09:44 PM   #7
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Depends how long he lives. I don’t see his invasion of Parthia going very well, but if he can spin some minor victories to the masses back home and drum up legions for a second invasion, buying up some of the local tribes/calvalry, the parthians could be in a lot of trouble dealing with perhaps the greatest general of antiquity, and that dream may see fruition.
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Old December 29th, 2017, 01:42 AM   #8

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Well Parthia and Parthian warfare by the Time Caesar would approch them would be well known to Romans , Bassus Proves that Parthians could be defeated sonorously by romans, the matter is how far would Caesar go.
According to previous conquests of Iranic regions if not wrong some major victories would grant control of the territory and microbattles for subduing wouln't be necessary like in Gaul...

So probably Caesar could take over Parthia and inherid all borders for Roman empire, from there on his plan apparently sugests he woun't push toward India but trun North , subdue the plains tribes of Scythians , Sarmatians or others and then turn toward Germany and Retrun to Italy.
Germany could be probably subdued like Gaul with a series of wars but also quicker than Gaul couse of the lower technological level and lesser cohesion of the tribes.
Poland? Ukraine?
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Old December 29th, 2017, 02:00 AM   #9

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.
Sound like a recipe for disaster , the steppes tribes had chewed Darius , then Alexander
Sulla had some trouble attempting to cross the Caucasus passes , eventually he had to give up
Then , the travel around the Euxine is very long
no matter how good the legions were , they would have been constantly harassed , forced to advance in a compact formation , this is very slow and would use their supplies
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