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Old October 5th, 2011, 08:35 PM   #21

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This is what they say:

Quote:
- People born before 1946 were called The Silent generation..

- People born between 1946 and 1964 are called The Baby Boomers.

- People born between 1965 and 1979 are called Generation X.

- And people born between 1980 and 2010 are called Generation Y.


Why do we call the last group Generation Y?


Y should I get a job?
Y should I leave home and find my own place?
Y should I get a car when I can borrow yours?
Y should I clean my room?
Y should I wash and iron my own clothes?
Y should I buy any food?
But a cartoonist explained it very eloquently below....


Click the image to open in full size.
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Old October 5th, 2011, 08:56 PM   #22

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Originally Posted by d'artanian View Post
My neighbor, a female, is 77 years old. She is lost when it comes to modern day technology. She sorta understands what a computer and a cell phone are about, but has never had an interest in exploring any of it. She doesn't drive either. The point is, some folks are never interested in moving out of their comfort zones, regardless of the era in which they live.
Digital immigrants may not be capable mastery of digital technology for the same reason most adults who decide to study music they missed as children, fail. Neural wiring of the adult mind prevents it. I recommend you read Prensky's Digital Immigrants, Digital Natives

http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/P...0-%20Part1.pdf
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Old October 5th, 2011, 10:10 PM   #23
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Why don`t you just ask them

anyway a better question would be what would sombody from the 1850s think of today
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Old October 6th, 2011, 07:27 AM   #24

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The sum of human knowledge doubles appx. every three years now and is shrinking. A century ago the same required half a century. The PC propelled humanity into a neo-Renaissance, achieving the same proliferation of knowledge Gutenburg's movable type press did for the original Renaissance. I believe Marco Polo brought that inspiration back from China along with gunpowder for weaponry, and pepper for food preservation. Consequently Chinese influence on Europe was enormous without one foot of invasion.

The span of time required for a person to become uncomfortably unfamiliar with the technological edge of humanity and that epistomology is less than the fifty year period of this proposal.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 08:58 AM   #25

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikespeak14109 View Post
The sum of human knowledge doubles appx. every three years now and is shrinking. A century ago the same required half a century. The PC propelled humanity into a neo-Renaissance, achieving the same proliferation of knowledge Gutenburg's movable type press did for the original Renaissance. I believe Marco Polo brought that inspiration back from China along with gunpowder for weaponry, and pepper for food preservation. Consequently Chinese influence on Europe was enormous without one foot of invasion.

The span of time required for a person to become uncomfortably unfamiliar with the technological edge of humanity and that epistomology is less than the fifty year period of this proposal.
Pepper was being used in Europe long before the time of Marco Polo. the Venerable Bede left pepper among other treasure in his will, and he died about 500 years before Marco Polo went to China.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 09:08 AM   #26
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Wenge is on the nose. We, or I, also miss some of the blissfully ignorant innocence of the 50's. One thing I do not miss, and am glad my kids and grandkids did not have to put up with, is the utterly ridiculous "duck and cover" days of civil defense. Otherwise, I don't think this forum would work well on a Ma Bell party line.
I regret the change in public education and therefore our culture. Don't get me wrong. I love our technology, and especially the the fact that so many of us are living so much longer because of it. This is the first time in history there have been so many long lived people and when we add to this, the Internet, the potential for dramatic change is very exciting!

This rapid advancement in technology is the effect of WWII, and especially the drastic effect of replacing our liberal education with education for technology for military and industrial purpose. This of course is part of the Military Industrial Complex, of which Eisenhower spoke, and as he said it would, the Military Industrial Complex has effected every aspect of our lives.

I am wondering what the impact of people who are history will have on the continuing changes. The Baby Boomers, benefited greatly from government spending, and the GI bill. We were up with great hopes and thought we were going to create a better world. Now that we have free time and the Internet, I wonder how many of us will return to our past social concerns and make a difference? The dive in our industrial base, and economy, is a huge set back. Will it have any positive effects? It is threatening the Older Americans Act that was one of the most hopeful pieces of legislation ever created at a time when it could have the most impact on our civilization. The psychological effect impact of the down turn concerns me very much. We just aren't as hopeful as once were, and have become over fearful and negative on one hand, with unrealistic expectations on the other.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 09:53 AM   #27

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Originally Posted by Pikespeak14109 View Post
Digital immigrants may not be capable mastery of digital technology for the same reason most adults who decide to study music they missed as children, fail. Neural wiring of the adult mind prevents it. I recommend you read Prensky's Digital Immigrants, Digital Natives

http://www.marcprensky.com/writing/P...0-%20Part1.pdf
Oh baloney, I bought a piano when I was 35. I took a few lessons and practiced until I had mastered Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. Then I lost the desire to do more while making the excuse I didn't have the time, etc. I know at least 6 other people who've done the same thing.

At 77, my neighbor may have lost "the window" but that doesn't explain why she didn't buy a computer/cell phone at age 60. There are thousands of seniors online who've taken up technology at an advanced age.

For MOST things in life, desire is everything; either you want to or you don't. There are far too many examples of people accomplishing the impossible at an advanced age. Having said that, I do agree some of us are born with certain physical characteristics that others do not possess. A voice box is an example. I couldn't sing like an opera singer if I practiced morning and night because my vocal chords are not going to allow it.

I do believe Albert Einstein had it right when he said: "It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer."

Last edited by d'artanian; October 6th, 2011 at 09:59 AM.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 04:51 PM   #28

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Originally Posted by d'artanian View Post
Oh baloney, I bought a piano when I was 35. I took a few lessons and practiced until I had mastered Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. Then I lost the desire to do more while making the excuse I didn't have the time, etc. I know at least 6 other people who've done the same thing.
[/COLOR]
Not here to argue with you sir. You didn't read Op 27 No 2, (Moonlight) nor play the whole work. Nobody after a few lessons plays the third movement.
You may have figured out notes of the first movement. There is far more to that music than notes. During my career I taught several thousand students, am a world class pianist and composer trained at Juilliard, so insight of my experience isn't made lightly.

Prensky's papers (more than one) were part of my doctoral lit review in the neuroscience of music psychology about how music stimulates physical development of the mind measurable by academic achievement. There are observable, measurable differences in neural growth visible in PET scans of people exposed to digital technology from an early age, opposed to those who weren't. For most people not exposed to digital technology from an early age, digital code and routing logic is a process of struggle that to the native is almost natural, similar in difficulties to sight reading written notes into performed music.

Last edited by Pikespeak14109; October 6th, 2011 at 05:04 PM.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 05:00 PM   #29

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Pepper was being used in Europe long before the time of Marco Polo. the Venerable Bede left pepper among other treasure in his will, and he died about 500 years before Marco Polo went to China.
Yes. Polo was not the first, but he was one of the most important and remembered because of Renaissance popularization of his travels. His experiences became told in folksong, that A Scarlatti immortalized in Gial Sole dal Gange.
. "Sky so clear, stars shine in the daytime!" Pepper (Schinus mollis) preserved food better than salt, and killed bacteria, not to mention what it did for taste. Columbus sought pepper in effort to be the "Bill Gates" of his day, since pepper was a more valuable treasure than gold. He reasoned that since pepper was wood, and wood floats, he could bring far more back by ship than overland, especially risky at Khyber Pass, and retire too rich to touch. He deliberately called the similarly functional and tasting chiles brought back from America "pepper" (pepe) for confusion and to make his financial killing. To this day we still call chiles peppers. You can find record of this in his journals, although much is disputed. Internet History Sourcebooks

Last edited by Pikespeak14109; October 6th, 2011 at 05:37 PM.
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Old October 6th, 2011, 05:05 PM   #30
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Well of a person of the fifties I can`nt get over how no one makes their beds. We were taught the min you got up to make your bed. Out of all my kids and people that I know except my Mom, no one does that anymore and how the liberals demanded open sexuality but now say stay out of my business, especially the politicians
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