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Old November 16th, 2012, 08:20 AM   #41

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I'm sure you have seen it, but here it is again:
http://www.historum.com/asian-histor...ai-thread.html
It was created before I joined.

Cheers for the link Nao, it looks fantastic!
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Old November 16th, 2012, 08:31 AM   #42

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The serpent and dying god are found in Shinto mythology as well - the serpent being the eight-headed Yamato-no-Orochi, and the dying god being the female Izanami, who is the goddess of creation and death.
The Moai is a Tupi guarani serpent that killed a steals the souls of the peoples he is killed by a goddess Porsy that die in the fight too
Tup the Thunder god (and one of the most badass god) transforms the spirit of Porsy in the light of dawn


Tupi Iara or Me D'agua was a a half fish half woman deity that was so beautiful that men kill themselves quite similar with the mermaids.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:02 AM   #43

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The Moai is a Tupi guarani serpent that killed a steals the souls of the peoples he is killed by a goddess Porsy that die in the fight too
Tup the Thunder god (and one of the most badass god) transforms the spirit of Porsy in the light of dawn


Tupi Iara or Me D'agua was a a half fish half woman deity that was so beautiful that men kill themselves quite similar with the mermaids.

What tradition(s) are these from Tairusiano?
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:15 AM   #44

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What tradition(s) are these from Tairusiano?
I was thinking the same.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:23 AM   #45

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What tradition(s) are these from Tairusiano?
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I was thinking the same.
They come from the Tupi-Guarani (the biggest linguistic family of Brazilian Natives) mythology
they have a quite complex pantheon compared to other tribes
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:25 AM   #46

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Wikipedia has a good list of these mythological deities and the fables which surround them. Any so called 'professional academic' that would laugh at such would not be 'professional academics' in the first place.

Not quite sure what you find so funny about it, especially considering that you believe in a book that many 'professional academics' believe to be mythology.
Such is the nature of apologetics. They rely on being very critical of other theories and very much less than critical of their own theories, which are often presented as if they should be taken at face value.

Sankari's two articles do make some valid points, but then resorts to excessive semantics and generalizing of their own.

They are attempting to show that Jesus is completely unique, but do so by making the error that they condemn . . . . simplifying OTHER traditions.

In truth all traditions are unique in their own way but none are completely devoid of templates that can be found in other traditions.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:26 AM   #47

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They come from the Tupi-Guarani (the biggest linguistic family of Brazilian Natives) mythology
they have a quite complex pantheon compared to other tribes
Cool. Thanks for sharing. You've got some great info that I am not familiar with.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:34 AM   #48

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They come from the Tupi-Guarani (the biggest linguistic family of Brazilian Natives) mythology
they have a quite complex pantheon compared to other tribes
Thanks a lot.

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Such is the nature of apologetics. They rely on being very critical of other theories and very much less than critical of their own theories, which are often presented as if they should be taken at face value.

Sankari's two articles do make some valid points, but then resorts to excessive semantics and generalizing of their own.

They are attempting to show that Jesus is completely unique, but do so by making the error that they condemn . . . . simplifying OTHER traditions.

In truth all traditions are unique in their own way but none are completely devoid of templates that can be found in other traditions.
Absolutely. There is no way that the story of Jesus is unique but no other myths or stories are. As you say, they are all unique but share similar traits. It is being far too biased to assume one religious myth to be outstanding over the rest imo.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:41 AM   #49

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Thanks a lot.



Absolutely. There is no way that the story of Jesus is unique but no other myths or stories are. As you say, they are all unique but share similar traits. It is being far too biased to assume one religious myth to be outstanding over the rest imo.
Indeed. When the "serious" academic's sources contain religious imagery, that might be our first clue that they are not being completely academic.
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Old November 16th, 2012, 09:45 AM   #50

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What qualifications does one get in the "professional" field of mythology?
Good question Rasta. I have read several of Joseph's Campbell's books and they seemed very logical and make great sense to me. And have seen and heard many positive references to his work. Never anything of a negative basis...until this OP. Many artists use his ideas to convey what they believe are universal images.
The idea that there is commonality among mythologies is not a new one or an illogical one.
That there are "archtypes" to mythology also seems self-evident. It would be great to create a compendium of the entire world's mythologies organized as to archtype and subject. Doing so might then qualify someone for a degree in "mythology."
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