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Old November 28th, 2012, 02:32 AM   #11

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Originally Posted by Kevinmeath View Post
Brittany would have been bigger
The extensive Bronze-age civilisation of the Southern part of the country may have spread all over the Northern part of France, linking up with its cultural kin in Brittany. The tin trade in the West, the copper and lead trade in the North would have had an easier outlet to Europe and better access to the mediterranean markets through the European river systems instead of the risky voyage through Biscay, perhaps leading to a higher culture with palaces and pyramids instead of henges.
Later, the British tribes could have more easily come to the aid of their Gaullish allies against Roman agression, perhaps joining in the sack of Rome in 390BC and keeping the upstarts South of the Alps or later preventing Caesar's destruction of Gaulish civilisation.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 02:36 AM   #12
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The British would have more cheese.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 02:47 AM   #13

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The British would have more cheese.
There are currently 350 types of French Cheese registered by name ( down from 450 types in 1950)--de Gaulle only claimed 246 varieties. There are 750 "officially" registered British cheeses and 100 or so "unofficial" ones. Stinking Bishop, anyone?

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Old November 28th, 2012, 03:45 AM   #14

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Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
There are currently 350 types of French Cheese registered by name ( down from 450 types in 1950)--de Gaulle only claimed 246 varieties. There are 750 "officially" registered British cheeses and 100 or so "unofficial" ones. Stinking Bishop, anyone?
Yet you will never be such a cheese country as the Netherlands!
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Old November 28th, 2012, 03:49 AM   #15

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
There are currently 350 types of French Cheese registered by name ( down from 450 types in 1950)--de Gaulle only claimed 246 varieties. There are 750 "officially" registered British cheeses and 100 or so "unofficial" ones. Stinking Bishop, anyone?

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Not at 25 quid a kilo.
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Old November 28th, 2012, 04:00 AM   #16
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Yet you will never be such a cheese country as the Netherlands!
Fine with me, i cant stand strong cheese.Continental larger, that's another story
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Old November 28th, 2012, 05:30 AM   #17

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Anglo-gallic superstate.
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Old November 29th, 2012, 09:27 AM   #18

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I'm sure he meant all throughout european history. So at least the last 25 centuries or so.
The British Isles may very well have been connected to Europe 14,000 years ago when sea levels were 300-500 feet lower all over the world. Then the ice caps were far thicker than they are today. These ice caps began to melt for some un-as-yet fully explained reason and raised the levels of the ocean turning many connected areas of the world into islands.
Since "all throughout European History" would include as far back in time as Europe existed, it would also include 14,000 years ago.
Many interesting possibilities are offered about human migrations, occupations and developement arising out of the conditions that existed prior to this sea level rising.
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