Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > Speculative History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Speculative History Speculative History Forum - Alternate History, What If Questions, Pseudo History, and anything outside the boundaries of mainstream historical research


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 3rd, 2012, 05:21 PM   #21

Panthera tigris altaica's Avatar
Funyuns
 
Joined: Aug 2011
From: Texas
Posts: 7,050
Blog Entries: 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgarion View Post
The historian of the future may look back at the 20th and early 21st centuries and note that there was a country that for a brief hundred year period was able to dominate world affairs due to a fortunate combination of geograpical, political, economic and technological factors that have rarely come into such an alignment in human history. The historian may further note that for all its potential this country was only dominant for a very short while compared to the Romans, Greeks or various other world leaders.
Actually, i tend to look at the rise of the US in stages. It's regional hemispheric hegemony began in the late 1840's after the US victory in the Mexican - American war. It's expansion into the Pacific from the the late 1860's finally being complete after the Spanish-American war. A brief interval following the great war and an isolationist tendency and then finally the "explosive growth" of the US onto the world scene from 1940to current.

Of course, fate is a funny bird. If the Soviet Union didn't exist, this explosive growth of the US across the globe more than likely would not have occurred. What might have happened is left to the imagination as decolonization took place and there was no competing ideological powers to replace the empires as they went home. As strange as this will sound, but i think the US involvement with the world would have shrunk back to it's own hemispheric region rather than remain so globally involved. Does this sound about right?
Panthera tigris altaica is offline  
Remove Ads
Old December 4th, 2012, 01:30 AM   #22
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2012
From: Northern part of European lowland
Posts: 1,853

Though there is a lot to recognise there is still a lot of room for improvement of that legacy, if this disappearance should happen sometime in the future.
We should also depend how things are remembered normally depends heavily upon a present asituation. Therefore to exclude the way it eventually may disappear, and what is left from the picture is probably illusory, since it will make its mark upon how it is seen.
The best of future historians will be ready to recognise and admire as well as to critisize and dissaprove and will find lots of examples to support both possitive and negative views.
Fantasus is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #23

kauchenvinci-0's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: May 2012
From: On a chain of Extinct Volcanoes
Posts: 1,628
Blog Entries: 6

Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthera tigris altaica View Post
Actually, i tend to look at the rise of the US in stages. It's regional hemispheric hegemony began in the late 1840's after the US victory in the Mexican - American war. It's expansion into the Pacific from the the late 1860's finally being complete after the Spanish-American war. A brief interval following the great war and an isolationist tendency and then finally the "explosive growth" of the US onto the world scene from 1940to current.

Of course, fate is a funny bird. If the Soviet Union didn't exist, this explosive growth of the US across the globe more than likely would not have occurred. What might have happened is left to the imagination as decolonization took place and there was no competing ideological powers to replace the empires as they went home. As strange as this will sound, but i think the US involvement with the world would have shrunk back to it's own hemispheric region rather than remain so globally involved. Does this sound about right?
interesting ... I tend to agree
kauchenvinci-0 is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 02:00 AM   #24

kauchenvinci-0's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: May 2012
From: On a chain of Extinct Volcanoes
Posts: 1,628
Blog Entries: 6

USA , the greatest empire , the humankind has ever produced , is not going to wane away as it appears. Even if it wants to , the development in science and technology will not let that happen.
To be candid , Mesopotamia or Greek or Roman or Chinese or any other entity had no global level influence and the capabilities of projecting power as does Uncle Sam does . To attribute universality to any of the ancient or medieval civilizations is no more than mere biased or ignorant glorification.
The chance to emerge as a true world leader has emerged only after some phenomenal inventions of the modern era which shrunk the Globe and made this possible . The United Kingdom came very near to this position during the 18th-19th century , but the USA grabbed it from her root [or it was a historical destination] and then all it started .
As someone above said , all the factors like Geographical , scientific , spatial and temporal ... were in favour of the US for its emergence as 'world police and guardian.'

And this all has been only possible due to the proverbial and gargantuan leaps that have been made in the fields of science and technology and without which the great USA[ and the Great Britain] would have confined themselves to their continents.
I still think neither Rome nor Greece can come any where near to the USA in the terms of universal influence as some western romanticists tend to do .
And to address the op specifically , the legacy of the USA is the first and the last Global leader [ good or bad is a different case here as it is always subjective] and there can be no other country or entity that can take the role of a categoric leader and a sole super power as the USA did.
MAy be , if there could be a handful of some trend setting inventions [like what happened post renaissance during 17-18th centuries ] and if any one country would able to successfully integrate all of them into its economy and if it has the access to all the resources that are essentially required to build up power , may be , we'll see a super power again .
kauchenvinci-0 is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 05:21 AM   #25

zincwarrior's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2012
From: Texas
Posts: 4,867

I'd like to hope that the US is later known as the superpower that successfully ratcheted back to peaceful world player.
zincwarrior is online now  
Old December 4th, 2012, 05:54 AM   #26

Rongo's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
From: Ohio
Posts: 5,683

Quote:
Originally Posted by zincwarrior View Post
I'd like to hope that the US is later known as the superpower that successfully ratcheted back to peaceful world player.
So you think the US should have stayed out of WWII?
Rongo is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 06:25 AM   #27

Sargon of Akkad's Avatar
Backworldsman
 
Joined: Jun 2009
From: Glorious England
Posts: 6,987

Quote:
Originally Posted by constantine View Post
I think our contributions to the development and mass production of computational technology will be our biggest legacy. Regardless of what becomes of us, the internet we created and proliferated is going to define the future culture of every society on earth. An homogeneous global culture will be the legacy of the United States, how long we survive as a dominate superpower will simply dictate how much influence we will have on the specifics of this culture.
The US didn't 'invent the internet'.

Tim Berners-Lee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sargon of Akkad is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 06:41 AM   #28
Historian
 
Joined: Jul 2009
Posts: 9,001

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sargon of Akkad View Post
The US didn't 'invent the internet'.

Tim Berners-Lee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Now, Sarge, we all know Al Gore invented the Internet.
pikeshot1600 is online now  
Old December 4th, 2012, 06:43 AM   #29
Baldgustus of Baldistan
 
Joined: Aug 2009
From: Londinium
Posts: 4,511

Quote:
Originally Posted by pikeshot1600 View Post
Now, Sarge, we all know Al Gore invented the Internet.
His best invention was still Al Gore though
Baldtastic is offline  
Old December 4th, 2012, 08:09 AM   #30
Archivist
 
Joined: Feb 2012
From: Swimming in my thoughts...
Posts: 127

The Legacy of the US is the modern world. Americans have globalized (Americanize) the world from the cloths we were (mostly) to the music we listen to and the values and lifestyles seen as the norm. America is no longer just a nation, more of an ideology that spend the globe. Also the military might of the US is the greatest reason why democracy is so prevalent all around the world, what would the world looked like had the us lost WW2 or had the American Revolution failed to inspire it's French counterpart?
Sceonn is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > Speculative History

Tags
america, legacy



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Churchill's legacy Hostile1 General History 19 February 21st, 2014 05:29 AM
Would Lincoln Like His Legacy? ucanefan Speculative History 19 July 12th, 2012 04:32 PM
Jacksonian Democracy, its Legacy, and how that Legacy is Affected by Indian Removal DPNorman American History 29 April 7th, 2012 03:18 AM
The mission: Jesuit legacy in Latin America pinguin American History 7 October 9th, 2009 02:33 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.