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Old March 7th, 2015, 01:20 AM   #21

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They'd have all been killed by the drop bears and poisonous squirrels.
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Old March 7th, 2015, 11:11 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belgarion View Post
The SLOC should not be a problem if the US submarines are not operating and if carrier based aircraft and those from Port Moresby can neutralise the Australian airfields as the invasion fleet moves south. A very big ask.
Its not really the invasion fleet or the initial operations that are the worry, its the supply convoys that would have to run through the coral sea to support the campaign. Most of Queensland is simply too far from Port Moresby to be effectively countered by land based air power alone, and any airfields attacked in the initial operations would have been reasonably quickly repaired: the fleet carriers would have been required to protect and support the landing operations. Thus if you ignore Queensland you are pretty much leaving a large flank wide open.

As for US submarines, well I think in both scenarios they are, as I cant see any possible situation where teh US made peace with Japan and Australia was still fighting.

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It may be possible to run an 'island hopping' campaign as you describe, but again I think the sheer size of the area of operations and the logistics problems would be too difficult to overcome, even with secure bases in northern Queensland.
I'm not sure size alone is a limiting factor, after all, isn't the area Japan had already conquered far larger?

For me the two major issues with that kind of plan (the only feasible one I can see which leverages Japan's strengths) are:

1) Lets say Japan does make its largest landing around Brisbane with the objective of drawing the AIF units into battle; how are they going to stop a counter-attack by three Armoured divisions? Their anti tank capability was never great and they probably would not have air superiority.

2) If they fail each of these non mutually supporting beacheads is probably going to be counter-attacked by superior forces and destroyed in detail, as although the road system wasn't great there was a reasonably large and effective rail network along the eastern seaboard which the Australians could have used to concentrate along interior lines to achieve local superiority.

3) In the original scenario most of the US Navy is still intact, and they still have a three carriers in the game; Ranger, Saratoga & Wasp, plus USS Essex which was commissioned in December 1942, in addition a number of fast battleships. So I doubt the IJN would have unrestricted freedom of manoeuvre. There probably would have been some significant naval battles around Australia. Thus I don't think the Japanese would try anything too crazy in terms of their lands away from established air bases.
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Old March 7th, 2015, 01:33 PM   #23

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Thanks for adding the photos!
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Old March 12th, 2015, 02:44 PM   #24

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Japan couldn't get much past the coast. While they wouldn't NEED to if they wanted to simply neutralize Australia as a threat, they'd still need to get more South. Their loss at the Battle of the Coral Sea prevented that.
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Old March 12th, 2015, 03:15 PM   #25
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Japan couldn't get much past the coast. While they wouldn't NEED to if they wanted to simply neutralize Australia as a threat, they'd still need to get more South. Their loss at the Battle of the Coral Sea prevented that.
The hypothetical situation was what if the allies lost both the Coral Sea and Midway, and early 1942 went about as well for Japan as they could have dared to hope. How would the battle have gone had they attempted an invasion?

Really if they want to fully neutralise Australia, they need to take Sydney and Melbourne.
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