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Old November 17th, 2012, 05:35 AM   #11
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The Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004 killed over 230,000 people, the big majority of whom in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. That didn't trigger much 'morality' talk as far as I could recall it. Maybe there wan't much of a credible trigger anyway.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 05:46 AM   #12

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One always questions why very innocuous and insignificant cities located along a dying Sea became the focal point for a morality lesson from some deity
depends on the authors and what books were left after they burned down the libraries -and of course, the authors of the bible throught they could scare the hell out of the "lower levels" of humanity. they did.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 08:49 AM   #13

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The Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004 killed over 230,000 people, the big majority of whom in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. That didn't trigger much 'morality' talk as far as I could recall it. Maybe there wan't much of a credible trigger anyway.
Nothing to do with the OP, but I met a group of Anthroposophists a few years back who believed that individuals choose their lives before they are born, with awareness of how that life will pan out; choosing particular lives in order to teach their souls valuable lessons. According to them all those people who died in the 2004 tsunami had decided to be at that place at that time so that they could die in that way and enable their souls, and all those affected by the event, a lesson. I found that idea unnerving, and didn't get to the bottom of what that 'lesson' might have been.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 09:57 AM   #14

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Nothing to do with the OP, but I met a group of Anthroposophists a few years back who believed that individuals choose their lives before they are born, with awareness of how that life will pan out; choosing particular lives in order to teach their souls valuable lessons. According to them all those people who died in the 2004 tsunami had decided to be at that place at that time so that they could die in that way and enable their souls, and all those affected by the event, a lesson. I found that idea unnerving, and didn't get to the bottom of what that 'lesson' might have been.
There is so much about the Spiritual Universe we simply do not understand. The Great Mystery remains just that and no human can ever fathom all the intentions or purposes of the Great Mystery. The rules of incarnation are not fully understood and many meta-physicians are currently attempting to decipher them. And belief in any of these rules is personal.
Science refuses to accept spirituality because it is beyond its' capacity to purview.
One thing for sure. Belief is far more powerful than anything science believes is reality. Especially since belief is reality.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 10:01 AM   #15

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depends on the authors and what books were left after they burned down the libraries -and of course, the authors of the bible throught they could scare the hell out of the "lower levels" of humanity. they did.
Fear has always been at the heart of established religious philosophies. More about seeking wealth and power through fear than making one's fellow man comfortable, healthy and content.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 10:06 AM   #16

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The Indian Ocean Tsunami of 2004 killed over 230,000 people, the big majority of whom in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. That didn't trigger much 'morality' talk as far as I could recall it. Maybe there wan't much of a credible trigger anyway.
Were you there to hear the responses of the many locals affected. Would they have even trusted their deeply held spiritual feelings to the opinion of a stranger?
There may have been an initial phase of shock embracing all involved and then a rationale for causality would have arisen in the consciousness of those affected. A very normal response. How many blamed a god for this experience and how many realized it was nothing more than an act of nature caused by colliding continental plates?
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Old November 17th, 2012, 11:11 AM   #17

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One always questions why very innocuous and insignificant cities located along a dying Sea became the focal point for a morality lesson from some deity.
Innocuous and insignificant by today's standard maybe. But for the time they might have been relatively large enough to be classed as significant cities. According to the only account we have of them (the Bible) the five cities of the plain also each had their own king.
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Old November 17th, 2012, 02:22 PM   #18

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It says that Josephus saw the ruins of the cities in his time. This means he would have seen the same as what is shown in the photos; rock formations that resemble man-made structures (which is what I see).
He would have no reason to contradict the myth of destroyed cities.

What is the composition of the rock in these places? It looks to be sedimentary. Do the atmospheric conditions on the Dead Sea coastline create such shapes in this type of rock?
Are there any geologists who could contribute here? It would be useful to have their expertise on this subject and thread.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 12:35 AM   #19

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Innocuous and insignificant by today's standard maybe. But for the time they might have been relatively large enough to be classed as significant cities. According to the only account we have of them (the Bible) the five cities of the plain also each had their own king.
Even the smallest tribe had its chief. What some might euphemistically call a "king." Which the first European settlers often made the mistake of calling any native chieftain. However, chiefs are usually elected or chosen. Whereas "kings" are usually hereditary. Moreover, any sized group or community can have a "king."
I have seen these so-called "ruins" and they appear to be very small and extremely primitive communities of stone stacked structures. Nothing remotely sophisticated, What one would expect from the usual small stone age human communities. And yes, they could have been considered "significant" by the standards of the times. A population of a few hundred is certainly more significant than 50. Just as New York once only had a few hundred residents and was one of the largest European settlements on the eastern coast of North America. But I would hardly considered this particular New York as in any way "significant." Especially, when there were many Native American villages in the same region of far larger significance. And most of these same Native American communities were larger than either Sodom or Gommorah.
But there is no accounting how human imagination can take a community of a few hundred to become vast pleasure cities comparable to the magnificence of a Babylon, Athens or Persepolis.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #20
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I took one look at that link and lol'd.

Nothing credible has EVER come from those sorts...
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