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Old October 13th, 2017, 06:42 AM   #21

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Originally Posted by Dan Howard View Post
In reality, when both weapons remain dry, crossbows generally outrange longbows.
Does that apply even to indirect fire?
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Old October 13th, 2017, 06:48 AM   #22

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Does that apply even to indirect fire?
Once you get past 20-30 meters, all shots are indirect.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 06:55 AM   #23

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How did bolts compare to arrows, ballistically speaking? Did their length affect their range at all? Their accuracy when fired during high winds, in a high arc?

Were crossbows more difficult to make?

Last edited by RidiculousName; October 13th, 2017 at 07:28 AM.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 06:57 AM   #24

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Originally Posted by funakison View Post
The longbow was a weapon of status, used by skilled archers. The crossbow on the other hand was simple to operate.
By the 14th century, crossbowmen were highly trained specialised engineers and their weapons were complicated, precisely-crafted machines. Genoese crossbowmen were paid far more than English longbowmen.

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The crossbow was considered by many to be a weapon of mass destruction. Not only was it was remarkably accurate at long range, but more importantly, the bolts it fired could penetrate a knight’s armour.
Only the heaviest siege crossbows and only at close range. The ones used in open battle could not pierce a breastplate any more than a longbow could. At close range, both types of bow could penetrate thinner pieces of plate such as the side of a helmet or a vambrace but rarely deeply enough to cause an incapacitating injury.

Last edited by Dan Howard; October 13th, 2017 at 07:17 AM.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 07:02 AM   #25

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So, it seems like the longbow is kind of more suited to a big, tall man, I guess.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 07:26 AM   #26
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Crossbow had a lot of advantages, but also one important disadvantage. Good Crossbow was quite expensive weapon, so any peasant could harm a knight with such a weapon, but most of peasants would never be able to afford it. Short bolts are much cheaper to manufacture and transport, this could be very important to large armies. There were very few armies in history, that could manage logistics of producing and transporting millions of arrows. This is necessary if you want to use bowman as area of effect artillery.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 07:37 AM   #27

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So, if using the longbow, how many arrows wud a bowman normally carry?
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Old October 13th, 2017, 07:44 AM   #28
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I am not absolutely sure, but I think quiver would hold 24 and they usually carried 24 extra in some kind of bag. So something like 50 arrows, the rest would be coming from baggage train.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 07:58 AM   #29
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So, if using the longbow, how many arrows wud a bowman normally carry?
A sheaf would have 24 arrows, that was the basic combat load of an archer in battle. However, if they were stationary, in a fixed fighting position expecting little movement, or manning a rampart in a castle, etc., they could have numerous sheafs.
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Old October 13th, 2017, 08:04 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by RidiculousName View Post
How did bolts compare to arrows, ballistically speaking? Did their length affect their range at all? Their accuracy when fired during high winds, in a high arc?

Were crossbows more difficult to make?
Shape of projectile/aerodynamics, its weight, its velocity are what affect ballistics. So it really depended. In general a crossbow bolt would be shorter but thick, not as heavy as a longbow's arrow, but shot with higher velocity than most longbow arrows, at least with the better crossbows. So technically the crossbow would have better range.

However, the longbow had MUCH better rate of fire, the longbow cost less to buy, build, maintain, and required less specialized troops as long as it was national policy for mandatory archery training on a weekly basis (whereas there is no comparison to learning how to use a crossbow).
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