Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > War and Military History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

War and Military History War and Military History Forum - Warfare, Tactics, and Military Technology over the centuries


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 20th, 2010, 10:03 PM   #11
Citizen
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Russia
Posts: 32
Re: Is there any Web Service to find WW1 soldier?


Thank you for care. I'll try to communicate with given address.
chum is offline  
Remove Ads
Old December 23rd, 2010, 12:21 PM   #12

ashurbanipal's Avatar
Citizen
 
Joined: Aug 2010
From: Everywhere
Posts: 21
Re: Is there any Web Service to find WW1 soldier?


try the cwgc- commonwealth war graves comission website. Their archives contain basic details about millions of people who fought in both WWI and WWII. http://www.cwgc.org/debt_of_honour.asp?menuid=14-link.
ashurbanipal is offline  
Old December 29th, 2012, 01:17 PM   #13
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Hungary
Posts: 2,091

Quote:
Originally Posted by chum View Post
Hello!

My grand grand father was an Austrian soldier, who was badly wounded in Russia during WW1. He was cured by byelorussian peasants family and got married with their daughter. He never return home and lived in Byelorussia the rest of his life. He lived very short life and died of his wounds before WW2. There were two children he had with his wife. One of them was my grandpa. Even my mother never seen her grandfather and of course me too.

I have only one photo of grand-grand father in austrian uniform. And some pics when he lived in Byelorussia and was a Soviet citizen.

Now I have a feeling there are some archives somewhere, in Austria for example, wich contains information about solders who were scripted in army and took part in WW1.


If you have some info, please tell me.

Thanks in advance
I'm afraid im too late with these infos but i hope once the OP starter will visit the site again. But i just found online the Austro-Hungarian world war one casualty lists and these are the people who i found and had similar name to your ancestor (i checked Schreyers, Schreiers, there were no hits for Shreier spelling):

10.10.1914 report:
Schreyer Georg, Korp., IR. Nr. 26, 11. Komp., Ungarn, Hont, Salka, 1884, verw. (wounded)

on 10.7.1915
Schreier Georg, Inft., IR. Nr. 76, StbsAbt., Ungarn, kriegsgef. (became POW)

4.11.1914
Schreier Georg, Ldsch., LdschR. Nr. I, 13. Komp., tot (dead)

11.1.1915
Schreier Georg. Jag., F.IIJ. Nr. 28, 4 Komp., Ungarn, Arad, Elek. 1882, verw. (wounded)

Out of these he seems to be the most likely candidate:

on 10.7.1915
Schreier Georg, Inft., IR. Nr. 76, StbsAbt., Ungarn, kriegsgef.
it means he was an infantryman in the 76th (K.u.K.) Infantry Regiment, i'm not sure for what does "StbsAbt." stands, if somebody is more familiar with the Austro-Hungarian military abbreviations? He was from Hungary and he became a prisoner of war (kriegsgef. stands for that).

Unfortunetly it doesnt say when and where was he born, but the regiment's recruitment area were Sopron and Moson counties (today Győr-Moson-Sopron county) so he must hail from that area. His German name also fits to it perfectly, the ethnic composition of that regiment was mixed German-Hungarian. Also that regiment fought on the Russian front in that period.

Edit:

to check the source go to Czecz National Library site
http://kramerius.nkp.cz/kramerius/Welcome.do

To search among ww1 Austro-Hungarian casualties, write in the search field the name you are looking for and after it titleVerlustliste) , so it only search in the casualty list. Also sometimes need to try alternative spellings.

I also found info on a relative there, it was even mentioned in which prisoner camp was he in the Russian Far East.

Further info on the source
http://www.radixindex.com/databases/pv008001.shtml
Quote:
The source of this database
The Verlustliste, i. e. the Casualty list was a gazette published almost daily during the years of WW1 by the K.u.K. Ministry of War. The issues typically printed on 40-60 pages each (approx. 39,000 pages for the whole series) contain the casualties in sections like that of the officers, the one year volunteers, the military in the ranks, all in alphabetical order of surnames and given names. After a while a section of additions and corrections was added to the issues, too.
The publication includes military from all parts of Austria-Hungary, thus, soldiers from South-Tirol to Galicia, from Bosnia-Herzegovina to Bohemia appear in the lists.
...
The information to be found in the issues can be: person's name, rank, military unit name and number, zuständigkeit (place of residence), year of birth and casualty type. This latter can be death (date of date usually provided), injury, becoming a prisoner of war (often with a place). Sometimes entries don't have all these details, information can be partial.
Another series published parallel with Verlustliste was Nachrichte über Verwundete und Kranke. This has information about the whereabouts of the injured, naming the hospitals of Austria-Hungary.
Edit 2.:

I also found two Georg (Georgius is in Latin, György is in Hungarian) Schreiers who were born back then in Moson county in Hungary (so in the recruitment area of the 76th regiment), one in 1889, the other in 1893 who could be in military age in 1915. IMO there is good chance one of them could be your grand-grandfather:

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X8QD-KXT (Pomogy today belongs to Austria, in Burgenland province and called Pamhagen in German)
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/X2WT-9RN (Boldogasszony is also in Burgenland, Austria today, its German name is Frauenkirchen)

Last edited by Tulun; December 29th, 2012 at 02:43 PM.
Tulun is online now  
Old December 29th, 2012, 02:10 PM   #14
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2012
From: Pax juxta probitatem
Posts: 1,621
Blog Entries: 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulun View Post

Out of these he seems to be the most likely candidate:

on 10.7.1915
Schreier Georg, Inft., IR. Nr. 76, StbsAbt., Ungarn, kriegsgef.
it means he was an infantryman in the 76th (K.u.K.) Infantry Regiment, i'm not sure for what does "StbsAbt." stands, if somebody is more familiar with the Austro-Hungarian military abbreviations? He was from Hungary and he became a prisoner of war (kriegsgef. stands for that).

Unfortunetly it doesnt say when and where was he born, but the regiment's recruitment area were Sopron and Moson counties (today Győr-Moson-Sopron county) so he must hail from that area. His German name also fits to it perfectly, the ethnic composition of that regiment was mixed German-Hungarian. Also that regiment fought on the Russian front in that period.

Further info on the source
RadixIndex : Verlustliste - Austria-Hungary's casualty list in WW1
My edit. You are to be congratulated sir.

For the OP

"StbsAbt." looks like he belonged to a particular section (d.Abteilung = eng. department or branch) possibly even a Division. For further info, could this web site help you?
Genealogy in Austro-Hungarian Land Forces 1848-1938 Forum

"The basic unit of the infantry was the regiment. These were of three types: k.u.k., k.k. and k.u. (M.kir.). The k.u.k. could be IR, KJR or bhIR". This website (at the link provided>) details the organisation of the three main fighting arms of the Austro-Hungarian army, and to show how they developed during the war:> Austro-Hungarian Military Mail 1914-1918

(I'm not supposed to be here but good luck to the OP)
John Paul is offline  
Old December 29th, 2012, 02:30 PM   #15
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2010
From: Hungary
Posts: 2,091

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Paul View Post
My edit. You are to be congratulated sir.

For the OP

"StbsAbt." looks like he belonged to a particular section (d.Abteilung = eng. department or branch) possibly even a Division. For further info, could this web site help you?
Genealogy in Austro-Hungarian Land Forces 1848-1938 Forum

Thanks, you can be right, maybe it stands for Stabsabteilung? that is military staff/general staff, so then it can mean his post was there.
Tulun is online now  
Old December 29th, 2012, 02:54 PM   #16
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2012
From: Pax juxta probitatem
Posts: 1,621
Blog Entries: 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulun View Post
Thanks, you can be right, maybe it stands for Stabsabteilung? that is military staff/general staff, so then it can mean his post was there.
Stabs= Staff as in Stabsfeldwebel and Stabsabteilung = General Staff ;-) He could been attached to the General Staff, though it seems he was an Infantry Assault soldier but nothing else fits at the moment. Well done I can also offer this link: Austro-Hungarian Infantry Development 1914-1918: The organisation and wartime history of the Austro-Hungarian Infantry 1914-1918
John Paul is offline  
Old December 29th, 2012, 03:12 PM   #17
Historian
 
Joined: Nov 2012
From: Pax juxta probitatem
Posts: 1,621
Blog Entries: 14

The OP's gentleman was an Infantry soldier, maybe this Stbs.Abt thing is Sturmbattalionsabteilung. That soldier possibly belonged to a Storm Company, much more equipped and mobile than ordinary Infantrymen.For instance the Prussians in WW1 developed Infantry tactics and battalions, during 1915.

Sturmbataillon Sturmbataillon

Photo: WWI Austro-Hungarian Soldier - a photo on Flickriver

Last edited by John Paul; December 29th, 2012 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Added photo link
John Paul is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > War and Military History

Tags
service, soldier, web, ww1


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
slaves is military service athena War and Military History 34 June 20th, 2010 02:57 PM
Aztec vs. Dog Soldier Salah Speculative History 4 May 13th, 2010 06:53 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.