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View Poll Results: Japanese Yumi vs English Longbow
Yumi 22 32.84%
Longbow 45 67.16%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

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Old June 30th, 2011, 04:46 PM   #11

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pancho35 View Post
English Longbow > Every other bow in the entire world. Nothing can match its range and power.
Asiatic composite recurved bows would beg to differ.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 04:56 PM   #12

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Originally Posted by Toltec View Post
The main difference is draw weight. Japanese bows had a pull of around 30lb, .
I have actually seen these as high as 70 lbs. This was a modern yumi mind you, so I don't know if that draw weight existed during the ages of warfare. Seeing as how they trained much more extensively than modern practitioners, I wouldn't be suprised if they had bows that powerful however.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 05:39 PM   #13

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The draw strength is not overly important for arrows, when they are meant to be fired from a relatively close distance. A yumi with a 30 lb draw weight is capable at penetrating armour from a very close range.

However, given the nature of yoroi (samurai armour), they are relatively protective against piercing and slashing. Most war yumi that I have found have a draw weight of about 85-90 lbs.

Many modern bows are not designed for war, so it's hard to base it on that.


Here's a video of a modern practitioner performing battlefield kyudo. I believe this particular style is known as Satsuma Heiki-Ryu (i.e. invented by those fierce and scary Satsuma warriors who came up with the Jigen-Ryu sword style.)


Here's another of the same style, but done in a formation by a group (the lighting is not the greatest, since there's a glare. But it's decent enough).

Last edited by Thegn Ansgar; June 30th, 2011 at 05:47 PM. Reason: videos were messed up.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 05:57 PM   #14

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Originally Posted by Thegn Ansgar View Post
However, given the nature of Most war yumi that I have found have a draw weight of about 85-90 lbs.
That's definately equivalent to the longbow. With the longer Ya (arrows), it seems that the Yumi would pack more punch.

Does the shape of the Yumi affect its distance capabilities?
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Old June 30th, 2011, 06:01 PM   #15
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it should be noted that the Yumi were dropped at a faster rate than the Longbows with the introduction of guns, however this might have a lot to do with the fact that England was relatively at peace during that period while Japan was in it's most war like era.


The Yumi also wasn't as widely particed as the English longbows in purportion to the population.

Also, it's questionable as to how much armour the French horses really had in the hundred years war, the manuscripts from the similar era almost always depict them as having no armour as well. Where as after the 100 years war English involvement in wars outside of the isles were limited for the remainder of the Longbow period.

Last edited by RollingWave; June 30th, 2011 at 06:21 PM.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 06:05 PM   #16

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Originally Posted by RollingWave View Post
it should be noted that the Yumi were dropped at a faster rate than the Longbows with the introduction of guns, however this might have a lot to do with the fact that England was relatively at peace during that period while Japan was in it's most war like era.
The Japanese are nothing if not open to innovation.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 06:15 PM   #17

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Quote:
I have actually seen these as high as 70 lbs. This was a modern yumi mind you, so I don't know if that draw weight existed during the ages of warfare. Seeing as how they trained much more extensively than modern practitioners, I wouldn't be suprised if they had bows that powerful however.
Draw weights for infantry on foot could be quite high (it's usually around 100 lbs). A yumi/longbow could reach 500lb draw weight if they really wanted to. The problem is, no one would be able to draw it. The limitation for a bow's draw weight is not due to the design of the bow itself, but due to human muscle strength.

The exception would be the invention of ballistas. When a winch is added to the picture, humans really would be able to pull more than a bow could handle. There were workarounds. The Romans adopted torsion power, multiple bows/strings were used in East Asia, and late medieval Europe used steel bows.

Last edited by HackneyedScribe; June 30th, 2011 at 06:20 PM.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 06:18 PM   #18

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Quote:
Originally Posted by okamido View Post
That's definately equivalent to the longbow. With the longer Ya (arrows), it seems that the Yumi would pack more bunch.

Does the shape of the Yumi affect its distance capabilities?
I wouldn't say so, considering the fact that they are capable at shooting long range. But like most long range archery, these are specialized bows with extremely light arrows designed for going as far as can physically be done with said bow.

Even then, most commanders would not utilize long range archery while in battle. You're not as likely to kill or wound the other guy, and you're not as likely to hit them either. It becomes a waste of arrows.
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Old June 30th, 2011, 07:46 PM   #19

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Voted for the longbow because I think the range is greater than that of a Yumi...
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Old July 7th, 2011, 12:19 AM   #20
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The English War Bow was the first super weapon, used by commoners to kill the ruling class, the nobles. While the Japanese weapon was used by so called warriors who could not even win any battles outside their own country.
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