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-   -   Bad-assed Battle Cries in History (http://historum.com/war-military-history/31183-bad-assed-battle-cries-history.html)

Salah September 7th, 2011 04:42 PM

Bad-assed Battle Cries in History
 
At Fredericksburg and elsewhere, the Army of the Potomac's Irish Brigade shouted "faugh a ballagh", Gaelic for "clear the way".

Christian soldiers in the Hispanic Reconquista shouted "Santiago" meaning "Saint James" (who had become the patron saint of anti-Islamic warfare in Spain and Portugal); this battle-cry was adopted by the early modern Spanish army.

There are accounts of Jews and Israelis, both historically and modernly, shouting "Sh'ma Yisra'el" before charging into battle.

Some Plains Indians tribes apparently shouted "hoka-hey" or something to that effect as a battle-cry.

"Remember the Alamo" and "Remember Fort Pillow" were the vengeful battle-cries of the Texans in the Texan War of Independence, and the the black Union troops in the Civil War, respectively. Both battle-cries recalled an atrocity commited on their comrades by the enemy.

"Allahu akhbar" has been used as a battle-cry by Muslim soldiers and warriors throughout history, especially ones fighting for religious purposes.

American soldiers on both sides during the Civil War commonly shouted the name of their state or even city/town of origin as a battle-cry. Other Civil War soldiers sang songs like "John Brown's Body" and "The Bonny Blue Flag" in combat. The terrifying "Rebel Yell" is fairly well known.

Medieval and early modern English and British soldiers often shouted the name of the current king or queen, or perhaps "Saint George".

Many tribal peoples, including the Zulus and other African peoples, as well as the ancient Celtic tribes of Western Europe, would sing when marching, or charging into battle.

xander.XVII September 7th, 2011 04:45 PM

Soviet soldiers used to hoot "Urrah!" which is an ancient battle cry (already used by Goths)
Roman soldiers used to do "Barritus" that was a repeated hitting with swords or spears on the shield.
Italian soldiers in WWI screamed "Savoia!" before assaulting austrian lines.

M.E.T.H.O.D. September 7th, 2011 04:55 PM

Alexander's phalanxes battle cry was "alalalalai!"

irishcrusader95 September 7th, 2011 05:05 PM

URRAH!- shouted by soviet soldiers when charging towords german machine guns. it has since been adapted by the americans as 'hurrah' which is shouted whatever the ocasion 'the canteen has cheese burgers' 'HURRAH!'

Krystian September 7th, 2011 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irishcrusader95 (Post 749082)
URRAH!- shouted by soviet soldiers when charging towords german machine guns. it has since been adapted by the americans as 'hurrah' which is shouted whatever the ocasion 'the canteen has cheese burgers' 'HURRAH!'

It is actually an old bulgarian battlecry, used by bulgarian soldiers in every war since the liberation of 1878. Along with "На нож!/Na nozh!" (On knife) it became infamous among the enemy armies in the balkan wars (1912-1913) and first world war, so that sometimes enemy lines would break just by hearing it cause it meant the bulgarians were bayonet charging.

There's a famous painting in Bulgaria representing and bearing the name of the battlecry "On knife" when bayonet charging :

http://alfa.kachi-snimka.info/images/viu1315441291c.jpg

Frank81 September 7th, 2011 05:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by irishcrusader95 (Post 749082)
URRAH!- shouted by soviet soldiers when charging towords german machine guns. it has since been adapted by the americans as 'hurrah' which is shouted whatever the ocasion 'the canteen has cheese burgers' 'HURRAH!'


[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbjQeW8KRn0&feature=related]Russian Anthem,[/ame]

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In Spain as Salah ad-Din told "Santiago" is the war cry. The complete sentence is "Santiago y cierra Espaa!" which can be traslanted as "Santiago, charge Spain!". But Santiago along was commonly used.

In Aragon, the warcry was "Desperta Ferro!" = "Wake up Iron", iron in reference to the weapons.


In my island, the Berbers had a warcry that was "Aita, Aita, Datana" which seem to be not very warlike but actually that the transcription of castillians.

Krystian September 7th, 2011 06:24 PM

URAAAH in the Bulgarian army:

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5Yo8haGrDc"]Парада на Гергьовден 2 - Урааа / St Georges Day Parade - YouTube[/ame]

tjadams September 7th, 2011 09:08 PM

http://780x378-1.ikiwq.com/X2PRo1qpFq1CvOkKYSvLZa.jpg

"Remember the Alamo"! "Remember Goliad" !

Belgarion September 7th, 2011 09:15 PM

The Maori Haka would have to be the most impressive. Origially used as a challege before battle it's now used by the All Blacks before a match. This upsets some traditional Maori.

Earl_of_Rochester September 7th, 2011 09:47 PM

Ayo Gorkhali - Gurkhas, 'The Gurkhas are coming'


Wahoo Mohammed - British Parachute Reg Its use originates from World War II, 1942–1943, when men of the 1st Airborne Division were used for conventional combat for the first time in Tunisia, during the North African campaign.


'Have that you German/Bosch/Hun **** **** **** - A number of profane expletives yelled by most British infantry WW1/WW2


For a nautical version the Royal Navy has flown some famous signals such as 'England Expects', 'Engage The Enemy More Closely' and 'General Chase'.

http://www.talesofcuriosity.com/v/Ne...andExpects.jpg

http://www.secondworldwar.org.uk/kite/Kiteoillarge1.jpg
General Chase

http://www.heraldicneedlepoint.com/a...-enemy-500.jpg

EoR


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